Business

6:21pm

Fri December 13, 2013
Around the Nation

States Settle Into Wooing War With Bids For Boeing Plane Plant

Originally published on Fri December 13, 2013 6:56 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Negotiations between Boeing and the machinists union in Washington State broke down again last night. The union rejected Boeing's latest contract offer. The deal would've guaranteed that production of the new 777X airplanes would stay in the Seattle area. Now, the aerospace giant may be taking those planes and thousands of jobs elsewhere.

Other states are eagerly courting them. But Michael Tomsic of member station WFAE in Charlotte reports that landing the aerospace company won't come cheap.

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5:31pm

Fri December 13, 2013
The Salt

Call the FBI! China Is Trying To Steal America's Seeds!

Originally published on Fri December 13, 2013 7:54 pm

Seed corn sits in the hopper of a planter.
Scott Olson Getty Images

If you think grains of rice or kernels of corn are free gifts of nature, think again. Seed companies — and the FBI — take a very different attitude, and walking off with the wrong seeds can land you in very serious trouble indeed.

In two apparently unrelated cases this week, federal prosecutors arrested citizens of China and charged them with stealing seeds that American companies consider valuable intellectual property.

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10:45am

Fri December 13, 2013
Technology

Tech Companies Take Step Toward The 'Internet Of Things'

Originally published on Fri December 13, 2013 1:45 pm

Tech companies want to make your smartphones, TVs, lights and other appliances all work together, regardless of brand.
iStockphoto

Several companies have made what some see as a small step toward TVs, locks and household appliances all talking to each other.

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9:01am

Fri December 13, 2013
Economy

Mel Watt: A New Captain For America's Housing Market

Originally published on Fri December 13, 2013 12:19 pm

Rep. Mel Watt, D-N.C., listens as President Obama announces his nomination to head the Federal Housing Finance Agency. Watt was nominated in May, but Republicans blocked his confirmation until this week.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Seven months after his was nominated, the U.S. Senate this week confirmed former Rep. Mel Watt, D-N.C., to head the agency that oversees Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the giant companies that control much of the mortgage market.

The vote occurred after Democrats changed the rules on filibusters — now the Senate can confirm presidential nominees with a simple majority.

For people who watch the U.S. housing market, Watt's confirmation is a very big deal that could mean easier credit.

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7:52am

Fri December 13, 2013
World

In A City With Terrible Traffic, A Gridlock Economy Emerges

Originally published on Fri December 13, 2013 12:08 pm

For a price, this Jakarta mother will get into your car so you can drive in the carpool lane.
Robert Smith NPR

Jakarta, Indonesia, has some of the worst traffic on the planet. For some local entrepreneurs, all those people stuck in their cars are potential customers.

In a middle of one Jakarta traffic jam, a guy pushes his chicken cart through the cars, clanging his pots. Men walk down the center lane selling nuts, crackers as big as your head and other treats. They're all trying to make eye contact with the drivers.

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7:52am

Fri December 13, 2013
Health Care

Health Insurance Seekers Find Networks Missing Key Providers

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Across the country, many consumers shopping for health insurance on government-run exchanges are discovering that some of the best known doctors and hospitals will not be part of their health plan.

This is because as insurance companies try to make their plans more affordable, they' re using more restrictive, so-called skinny networks of health care providers.

NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

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5:19am

Fri December 13, 2013
The Salt

USDA Steps Up The Fight To Save Florida's Oranges

Originally published on Fri December 13, 2013 7:52 am

Oranges ripen in a Plant City, Fla., grove on Wednesday. Growers in Florida, Texas and California are worried about citrus greening, a disease that makes the fruit bitter and unmarketable.
Chris O'Meara AP

The citrus industry is facing a crisis. It's called citrus greening — a disease that has devastated orange production in Florida since it first showed up eight years ago. Now the U.S. Department of Agriculture has announced a new effort to try to control the disease before it destroys the nation's citrus industry.

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9:11pm

Thu December 12, 2013
The Two-Way

Chinese Ag Scientists Charged With Stealing Patented Seeds

Two agricultural scientists from China have been accused of trying to steal patented seeds from a biopharmaceutical company in Kansas.

Separately, six men from China, including the CEO of a seed corn subsidiary of a Chinese conglomerate, were charged Thursday with conspiring to steal patented seed corn from two of the nation's leading seed developers, prosecutors said Thursday, according to The Associated Press.

It wasn't immediately clear if the arrests were related, but The AP wrote of the group of six charged:

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6:49pm

Thu December 12, 2013
The Two-Way

House Approves Budget Deal; Compromise Heads To Senate

Originally published on Fri December 13, 2013 6:05 am

House Speaker John Boehner leaves a news conference Thursday, after criticizing conservative groups that he said held too much sway in Republican politics, "pushing our members in places where they don't want to be."
J. Scott Applewhite AP

The House has approved a bipartisan budget deal to cut around $23 billion from the federal deficit over 10 years while removing the threat of a possible government shutdown until 2015. A shutdown deadline had loomed for Jan. 15.

The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 also sets spending levels for the 2014 and 2015 fiscal years, which its backers say will add more stability to both the U.S. economy and the government's operations.

Update at 6:35 p.m. ET: The Vote Tally

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5:48pm

Thu December 12, 2013
Media

Photojournalists Push White House For Better Access To Obama

Originally published on Thu December 12, 2013 6:44 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Reporters today gave White House press secretary Jay Carney a tough time over the way the administration controls President Obama's image, in this case literally by limiting the situations in which professional photojournalists get to take pictures of the president. News organizations have formally protested and NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik joins us now to explain

Hey there, David.

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