Business

3:23am

Fri April 24, 2015
Art & Design

Slow Fashion Shows Consumers What It's Made Of

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 1:15 pm

The Zady clothing line sources cotton from the Texas Organic Cotton Cooperative in Lubbock, Texas.
Zady

If you're into "slow food" — the ethical response to "fast food" — you probably want to know how the animals were treated or whether pesticides were used on your vegetables. Now, the "slow fashion" movement is in the same spirit.

"It's about understanding the process or the origins of how things are made," says Soraya Darabi, co-founder of the clothing line Zady. "Where our products come from, how they're constructed and by whom. Slow fashion is really indicative of a movement of people who want to literally slow down."

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7:54pm

Thu April 23, 2015
The Two-Way

SkyWest Now Says Several Passengers Were Ill On Diverted Flight

SkyWest Airlines says three passengers lost consciousness on a plane, operating as United Express, that made an emergency landing in Buffalo on Wednesday.
Gary Wiepert AP

Officials at SkyWest Airlines and federal authorities say they still don't know what caused three passengers to lose consciousness on a flight that then made an emergency landing in Buffalo Wednesday. Earlier, the airline said one passenger was affected.

The SkyWest plane, operating as United Express flight #5622, was flying from Chicago's O'Hare airport to Hartford, Connecticut with 75 passengers on board.

Some passengers say part way into the flight, they started having trouble breathing, and felt dizzy and nauseous.

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6:55pm

Thu April 23, 2015
The Two-Way

Delinquent Mines: Congress Revives Bill To Hold Mine Owners Accountable

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 7:01 am

Federal lawmakers have revived a mine safety reform bill that addresses a regulatory failure detailed in a joint investigation by NPR and Mine Safety and Health News.

The Robert C. Byrd Mine Safety Protection Act includes a provision that directly addresses the Mine Safety and Health Administration's (MSHA) failure to fully enforce penalties for safety violations at the nation's mines.

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6:09pm

Thu April 23, 2015
All Tech Considered

Biometrics May Ditch The Password, But Not The Hackers

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:03 pm

Biometrics are increasingly replacing the password for user identification.
iStockphoto

Passwords get hacked — a lot. In an effort to move beyond passwords, big companies are embracing biometric technology: the use of fingerprints, iris scans or voice recognition for user identification.

To heighten security, smartphones are being outfitted with biometric features. But, ditching passwords for biometrics may not make the hackers go away.

Selfie Security

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5:21pm

Thu April 23, 2015
Animals

Return Of Horses A Sign Of Spring On Michigan Island

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 11:00 am

Every spring, hundreds of horses are ferried from their winter hiatus in the Upper Peninsula for a good grooming and harness fitting, before beginning their summer jobs pulling carriages.
Amy Robinson WCMU

Spring has a lot of faces around the country, like the cherry blossoms in Washington, D.C., and the sap run in Vermont. On one Michigan island, it's horses that are the harbinger of the season.

Mackinac Island draws a million visitors a year for its scenery, fudge and horses. Cars aren't allowed on the island, and every spring, hundreds of horses are ferried from their winter hiatus in the Upper Peninsula for a good grooming and harness fitting, before beginning their summer jobs pulling carriages.

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4:22pm

Thu April 23, 2015
The Two-Way

15 Years After The Dot-Com Bust, A Nasdaq Record

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:03 pm

As the Nasdaq closes above the record set 15 years ago, stock analysts are debating whether the market is approaching another bubble.
Bryan Thomas Getty Images

When it closed at 5,056.06 on Thursday, the Nasdaq Composite Index hit a new high — surpassing the old record close of 5,048.62, reached March 10, 2000, during the dot-com craze.

That also makes it 15 years since that infamous tech bubble burst, sending the index down more than 75 percent by the time it hit bottom.

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3:16pm

Thu April 23, 2015
The Salt

How Texas Ranchers Try To Clinch The Perfect Rib-Eye

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:03 pm

Donnell Brown and another cowboy move a grouping of bulls from one pen to another on rib-eye ultrasound day in March at the R.A Brown Ranch.
David Gilkey NPR

We're heading into grilling season, which means breaking out the burgers and brats. But if you're a true meat lover, the slab you'll want to be searing is the rib-eye.

The rib-eye is the bestselling cut of beef in America both at the supermarket and the steakhouse, according to the National Cattlemen's Beef Association.

Beef lovers go crazy for it because of its marbling — the network of fat within muscles that melts on the grill and makes the steak juicy and tender.

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2:56pm

Thu April 23, 2015
Shots - Health News

Couples Counseling Catches On With Tech Co-Founders

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:03 pm

Work partners Jon Chintanaroad (left) and Mike Prestano are all smiles now, but founding a tech startup together threatened their friendship — and their business.
April Dembosky KQED

Startups fail for a lot of reasons: bad product, wrong timing. But sometimes, it's just you.

Relationship problems between co-founders are among the biggest reasons companies don't make it. Increasingly in Silicon Valley, business partners are looking for help before things go downhill — they're signing up for couples counseling.

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2:12pm

Thu April 23, 2015
It's All Politics

Rubio Takes Up Koch Brothers Charge On Export-Import Bank

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 2:25 pm

Sen. Marco Rubio speaks at the First in the Nation Republican Leadership Summit in New Hampshire earlier this month.
Getty Images

There's a growing battle in Washington, especially among Republicans, over the Export-Import Bank, an 80-year-old federal agency that helps to finance American companies in foreign trade. Congress must reauthorize the bank by June 30 or it will shut down.

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11:10am

Thu April 23, 2015
The Two-Way

Germany's Largest Bank Fined $2.5 Billion In Rate-Fixing Scandal

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 3:35 pm

The headquarters of Deutsche Bank in Frankfurt. Germany's largest bank has been hit with a $2.5 billion fine for manipulating a key interest rate. Seven other banks in various countries have also been fined in the far-reaching scandal.
Michael Probst AP

Deutsche Bank, Germany's largest bank, has been fined $2.5 billion by U.S. and U.K. regulators for trying to manipulate the so-called LIBOR rate, a benchmark for interbank loans, which in turn is used to set interest rates on everything from credit card debt to mortgages.

The German bank is one of eight financial institutions, including Swiss-based UBS and the Royal Bank of Scotland, that were caught up in the scandal, which involved dozens of traders and managers and spanned a four-year period from 2005-2009.

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