Business

3:36pm

Tue March 11, 2014
The Two-Way

Bitcoin Exchange Mt. Gox Files For Bankruptcy In U.S.

Weeks after its financial troubles forced it to file for bankruptcy protection in Japan, Mt. Gox has obtained similar protection in the U.S. The Tokyo-based bitcoin exchange suffered a collapse after a reported theft of hundreds of millions of dollars.

Mt. Gox had been the most active bitcoin exchange before it announced the loss of hundreds of thousands of units of the cryptocurrency in an attack by hackers. The company said its own bitcoins were stolen along with those of customers.

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3:08pm

Tue March 11, 2014
Parallels

Norway Takes The Lead In Electric Cars (With Generous Subsidies)

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 6:51 pm

Jonette Øyen with her Nissan Leaf outside the National Archives in Norway, where she works. Next month Norway is expected to become the first country where one in every 100 cars is purely electric.
Sidsel Overgaard NPR

When Jonette Øyen bought her first electric car, it turned heads. "Now nobody turns around!" she says with a laugh.

Sometime in April, Norway is expected to become the first country where one in every 100 cars is purely electric. One percent may not sound like a huge figure, but in the U.S., the equivalent number would be something close to .07 percent.

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2:25pm

Tue March 11, 2014
The Salt

For A Faster-Aged Bourbon, You Need The Motion Of The Ocean

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 10:48 am

Jefferson's Ocean bourbon is aged on the high seas, a technique that takes advantage of basic physical chemistry. The bottles sell for $200 a piece.
Courtesy of OCEARCH

From its earliest days as America's homegrown whiskey elixir, Kentucky bourbon has been traveling on boats.

In fact, boats were a key reason why Kentucky became the king of bourbon. In the late 1700s, trade depended on waterways, and distillers in the state had a big advantage: the Ohio River. They'd load their barrels onto flatboats on the Ohio, which flowed into the Mississippi, taking their golden liquor as far down as New Orleans.

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12:22pm

Tue March 11, 2014
The Two-Way

Reporter For Swedish Radio Shot Dead In Afghanistan

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 1:08 pm

A photo from last year of Swedish Radio journalist Nils Horner, who was killed Tuesday in Kabul, Afghanistan.
Mattias Ahlm AP

A Swedish journalist was gunned down in a heavily guarded section of the Afghan capital that is home to Westerners working for aid agencies, embassies and news organizations.

Nils Horner, 51, who has dual British-Swedish nationality, worked for Swedish Radio and had been in Afghanistan for only a few days prior to Tuesday's attack in Kabul.

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11:39am

Tue March 11, 2014
#NPRWIT: Women In Tech

Investing In Women Entrepreneurs

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 12:50 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We're going to start the program today by returning to our series of conversations about and with women in tech. All this month, which happens to be Women's History Month, we're hearing from innovators from around the world as they tweet a day in their lives using the hashtag #NPRWIT. We're also speaking with trailblazers about new ideas they're bringing to tech and how they're encouraging more women and girls to enter the field.

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7:24am

Tue March 11, 2014
Business

Dropcam Lets Owners Keep Tabs On Their Pets

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 10:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: Doggie Cam.

There has been a lot in the news lately about the Internet and privacy. And now it seems that even pets are under surveillance by owners.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

That's right. Thanks to a newly-improved smartphone app and device called the Dropcam, pet owners can check in on their furry friends while they're at work or out of town. Through the app, you can not only see your dog, but talk to them through a speaker as well.

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7:19am

Tue March 11, 2014
Business

Congress To Investigate General Motors Recall

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 10:28 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with Congress investigating a GM recall.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: General Motors last month recalled 1.6 million older-model compact cars. The concern was that faulty ignition switches could cause the cars engines to turn off - a problem that's been linked to 13 deaths. GM employees knew of the issue as early as 2004, according to the company's own chronology.

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6:17am

Tue March 11, 2014
Business

Ice And Snow Forced Airlines To Cancel Thousands Of Flights

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 10:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

So far this winter, lots of snow and ice has forced major U.S. airlines to cancel more than 74,000 flights. At an aviation conference in New York yesterday, top executives of some of the nation's biggest airlines spoke about how those cancellations are affecting business.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

JIM ZARROLI, BYLINE: American Airlines said it cancelled 28,000 flights in January and February. Almost as many flights were grounded by United Continental. At Southwest 6,500 flights were cancelled.

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6:11am

Tue March 11, 2014
Business

Will Stocks' 5-Year Trajectory Keep Going Higher?

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 10:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

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5:04am

Tue March 11, 2014
Around the Nation

2013 Flooding Still Dampens Colorado's Tourist Trade

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 9:40 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Now for an update on a more recent disaster here in the U.S. In September of last year, heavy rain flooded large areas of Colorado, killing 10 people, damaging businesses, homes, and roads. Many towns are still struggling to recover.

Grace Hood from member station KUNC traveled to two communities in northern Colorado that were among the hardest hit to see how they are coping today.

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