Business

5:34pm

Tue August 4, 2015
The Salt

Judge Strikes Down Idaho 'Ag-Gag' Law, Raising Questions For Other States

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 8:25 pm

Laws in Montana, Utah, North Dakota, Missouri, Kansas, Iowa and North Carolina have also made it illegal for activists to smuggle cameras into industrial animal operations.
iStockphoto

Idaho's so-called "ag-gag" law, which outlawed undercover investigations of farming operations, is no more. A judge in the federal District Court for Idaho decided Monday that it was unconstitutional, citing First Amendment protections for free speech.

But what about the handful of other states with similar laws on the books?

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4:29pm

Tue August 4, 2015
Energy

When Relying On The Sun, Energy Storage Remains Out Of Reach

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 8:02 pm

Jim and Lyn Schneider installed solar panels and batteries because bringing grid power to their house in central Wyoming was going to cost around $80,000.
Leigh Paterson Wyoming Public Radio

The ability to store energy could revolutionize the way we make and use electricity. But for many utility companies and regular folks, energy storage is still way out of reach. It's expensive — sometimes more expensive than building out old-fashioned infrastructure like power lines and power plants.

For people like Jim and Lyn Schneider, their decision to invest in battery storage came four years ago when they moved to central Wyoming.

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11:57am

Tue August 4, 2015
The Two-Way

Your Pill Is Printing: FDA Approves First 3-D-Printed Drug

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 1:49 pm

A product image provided by Aprecia Pharmaceuticals shows Spritam 750 mg (foreground) and 1,000 mg tablets. The 3-D-printed pills have been approved by the FDA.
AP

In a first, the Food and Drug Administration has given approval to a drug that is produced on a 3-D printer. The pill, produced by Aprecia Pharmaceuticals, treats seizures. It's expected to hit the market in the first quarter of 2016.

NPR's Rob Stein reports for our Newscast unit:

"The drug is called Spritam and is designed to treat seizures in people suffering from epilepsy. It's a new version of a seizure medication that's been on the market for years.

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7:04am

Tue August 4, 2015
Technology

How Cellphone Use Can Help Determine A Person's Creditworthiness

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 8:19 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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5:49am

Tue August 4, 2015
Politics

New Power Plant Rules Likely To Start Slow-Burning Debate, Legal Action

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 11:56 am

A coal scraper machine works on a pile of coal at American Electric Power's Mountaineer coal power plant in 2009 in New Haven, W.Va. The state, in which coal mining is a major industry, is one party planning to sue the Environmental Protection Agency regarding new power plant regulations announced Monday.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

An epic legal battle is about to begin over President Obama's plan to address climate change, in which the Environmental Protection Agency is putting in place new limits on greenhouse gases from power plants. Critics argue the plan is on shaky legal ground, but the administration says it's prepared to defend the regulations in court.

In announcing the "Clean Power Plan" on Monday, Obama predicted some of the arguments his critics would make.

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5:49am

Tue August 4, 2015
The Salt

Here's The Buzz On America's Forgotten Native 'Tea' Plant

Originally published on Tue August 11, 2015 12:13 pm

Yaupon growing in the wild in east Texas. This evergreen holly was once valuable to Native American tribes in the Southeastern U.S., which made a brew from its caffeinated leaves.
Murray Carpenter for NPR

During a severe drought in 2011, JennaDee Detro noticed that many trees on the family cattle ranch in Cat Spring, Texas, withered, but a certain evergreen holly appeared vigorous. It's called a yaupon.

"The best we can tell is that they enjoy suffering," Detro says with a laugh. "So this kind of extreme weather in Texas — and the extreme soil conditions — are perfect for the yaupon."

Detro began researching yaupon — a tree abundant in its native range, from coastal North Carolina to East Texas — and discovered that the plant contains caffeine and has a remarkable history.

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5:49am

Tue August 4, 2015
The Salt

How New Jersey Tamed The Wild Blueberry For Global Production

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 1:48 pm

Final inspection of frozen blueberries at the Atlantic Blueberry Co.
Dan Charles NPR

Nearly every plant that we now depend on for food — from wheat to beans to tomatoes — comes from ancestors that once grew wild on hills and in forests.

In most cases, we don't know who, exactly, tamed those plants. We don't know which inventive farmer, thousands of years ago, first selected seeds and planted them for food.

The blueberry, though, is different. We know exactly who brought it in from the wild, and where.

It happened in the pine barrens of New Jersey.

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5:01pm

Mon August 3, 2015
Latin America

Puerto Rico Fails To Make Its Bond Payment

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 10:52 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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5:01pm

Mon August 3, 2015
Your Money

Alabama Drivers Are Filling Up On Cheap Gas

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 10:52 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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4:54pm

Mon August 3, 2015
The Salt

Wanted: More Bulls With No Horns

One of the hornless Holsteins at Steve Maddox's California dairy farm. Maddox is beginning to breed hornless cattle into his herd, but it's slow going.
Abbie Fentress Swanson for NPR

The next time you're in the dairy aisle at the supermarket, take a moment to imagine the animals that produced all that milk. Do these cows have horns? Chances are they do, or at least they did at birth.

About 85 percent of milk sold in the United States comes from Holstein cows born with horns. But it's standard practice for farms to remove horns from cattle to prevent injuries to workers, veterinarians and other cows in the herd.

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