Business

5:19pm

Thu May 7, 2015
Parallels

'Haqqathon' Takes Anti-ISIS Fight To Cyberspace

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 9:24 am

Haqqathon-ers from the winning team, which developed the social media site Champions of Islam, at the event in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
Courtesy of Rim-Sarah Alouane

In Arabic, haqq is the word for truth.

Last week in the United Arab Emirates, group of Muslim scholars held what they called a "haqqathon" – a hackathon meant to create new ways for Islamic scholars to connect with young Muslims and, by doing so, defuse violent extremists like the self-proclaimed Islamic State.

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3:52pm

Thu May 7, 2015
The Two-Way

Crowdfunding Sought To Release Orson Welles' Unfinished Final Film

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 5:32 pm

Orson Welles' last film, The Other Side of the Wind, may finally be nearing release after decades as one of cinema's most storied unfinished creations.
Jacques Langevin AP

Orson Welles' The Other Side of the Wind has been the subject of books, legal battles and controversy — all for a movie that was never completed. But, if a group of producers have their way, the movie that was supposed to be Welles' comeback film might still see the light of day.

As NPR's Andrew Limbong reports, they have started a $2 million crowdfunding campaign on the website Indiegogo to finish putting the movie together. Andrew says:

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2:39pm

Thu May 7, 2015
The Salt

From Cartoon Chubster To Handsome Hipster: McDonald's Revamps Hamburglar

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 9:02 pm

The Hamburglar is all grown up, slimmed down — and with a family.
McDonald's AP

We usually hate it when media speculate about whether a celebrity has had a nip or tuck, but it must be said: The Hamburglar has definitely had some work done.

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1:14pm

Thu May 7, 2015
The Two-Way

Whole Foods Launching Lower-Cost Stores Geared Toward Millennials

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 4:00 pm

A man carries a surfboard past a Whole Foods store in Santa Monica, Calif. Whole Foods Market Inc. reported underwhelming second-quarter earnings on Wednesday.
Reed Saxon AP

Whole Foods, the upscale grocery store chain famous for its bright displays of produce and emphasis on organic foods, plans to launch a new chain of lower-priced stores aimed at millennial shoppers.

The yet-to-be-named stores will "feature a modern streamlined design, innovative technology and a curated selection," the company says in a statement.

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11:08am

Thu May 7, 2015
NPR Ed

Confusing Financial Aid Letters Leave Students, Parents Adrift

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 4:34 pm

"Knowing exactly how much college is going to cost should be as simple as knowing how many calories there are in a slice of bread," said Sen. Al Franken of Minnesota.
LA Johnson/NPR

Raised in foster care from the time he was 14, Marquell Moorer was determined to go to college, keeping up his grades and working part time at Dairy Queen to save up money for it.

By the end of his senior year at a high school in Milwaukee, he'd done so well that letters of acceptance started pouring in from not one or two, but 12 colleges and universities.

Moorer was still riding high when another wave of letters started to arrive: the ones outlining how much financial aid he would or would not be offered by each school.

And those proved a lot less clear cut.

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9:57am

Thu May 7, 2015
The Record

Songwriters And Streaming Services Battle Over Decades-Old Decree

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 2:16 pm

Neil Portnow (left), president and CEO of The Recording Academy, talks with Lee Thomas Miller, head of the Nashville Songwriters Association International, at a music licensing hearing in 2014.
Paul Morigi WireImage for NARAS

Music streaming services like Spotify and Pandora continue to grow more popular with music fans — but not with musicians, who complain they used to earn more in royalties from CD sales and music downloads. Songwriters say they've been hit even harder, and the Department of Justice appears to be taking their complaints seriously: It's exploring big changes to the music publishing business for the first time since World War II.

If you look at the top songs on the Billboard charts, most of them were written by at least one professional songwriter. It's a real job.

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6:30am

Thu May 7, 2015
Education

AltSchool Promises To Reimagine Education For the 2030s

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 1:48 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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5:53am

Thu May 7, 2015
Around the Nation

Unrest In West Baltimore Puts Elderly And Sick At Additional Risk

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 7:58 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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3:54am

Thu May 7, 2015
All Tech Considered

A Startup Scene That's Not So Hot: Japan's Entrepreneur Shortage

Originally published on Wed May 13, 2015 9:07 am

At Slush Asia, a new tech festival held in Tokyo in late April, the scene and the energy resembled a small-scale South by Southwest Interactive.
Elise Hu NPR

Toshiba. Sony. Sharp. You know those brand names because they dominated the Japanese economy's global rise in the '80s. But that was 30 years ago. As the Japanese economy stagnates, it's unclear which new companies will replace them.

Doga Makiura is Japanese, and a startup founder. But he's not a startup founder in Japan. He created businesses in other Asian countries instead.

Why not be an entrepreneur in his native country?

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3:50am

Thu May 7, 2015
Energy

Power Problems: Puerto Rico's Electric Utility Faces Crippling Debt

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 11:07 am

PREPA's Central Palo Seco power station in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The utility's bondholders want to raise rates. That's a challenge when the median income is about half that of Mississippi, yet the U.S. territory's energy costs are among the highest in the nation.
Alvin Baez-Hernandez Reuters/Landov

As a U.S. territory with tropical weather and beautiful beaches, Puerto Rico has a lot going for it. But there are downsides to living on an island. A big one is the cost of energy.

All the electricity on the island is distributed by the government-owned Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, also known as PREPA. Power on the island costs more than in any U.S. state, except Hawaii.

And that's not the biggest problem.

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