Business

5:28am

Wed December 18, 2013
Business

Law Schools See Drop In First-Year Students

Originally published on Tue December 24, 2013 1:18 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Could we be facing a shortage of lawyers? It hardly seems possible. But according to the American Bar Association, law schools are seeing their lowest number of first-year students since the 1970's.

NPR's Ina Jaffe has more.

INA JAFFE, BYLINE: This year, there were fewer than 40,000 first-year law students, which still seems like a lot. But it's an 11 percent drop from last year, and about a 24 percent drop from 2010, when new enrollments hit an all-time high.

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5:28am

Wed December 18, 2013
Economy

Fed's Final 2013 Meeting Could Indicate Course For Early 2014

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 8:02 am

Federal Reserve officials end a two-day meeting on Wednesday amid signs that the U.S. economy is slowly mending. David Greene talks to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, about the Fed's last meeting of the year.

5:28am

Wed December 18, 2013
Business

Retail Workers Forced To Deal With Holiday Tunes

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 8:02 am

Morning Edition reports on retail workers who are subject to holiday music for hours on end.

3:05am

Wed December 18, 2013
The Salt

Is A 500-Year-Old German Beer Law Heritage Worth Honoring?

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 8:56 am

Germans are serious about their beer. Serious enough for the European country's main brewers association to urge the United Nations to recognize that fact.

The brewers association wants a five-century-old law governing how German beer is made to become part of the UNESCO World Heritage list. It would join the Argentinian tango, Iranian carpet weaving and French gastronomy, among other famous traditions, that are considered unique and worth protecting.

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3:04am

Wed December 18, 2013
All Tech Considered

What It's Like To Live On Low Pay In A Land Of Plenty

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 1:11 pm

Manny Cardenas, seen here with his 5-year-old daughter Zoe, has earned $16 an hour as a part-time security guard at Google.
Laura Sydell NPR

This week, we're exploring the San Francisco Bay Area and the way income inequality is affecting the region. Check out the other pieces of the week, aggregated on this page.

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3:03am

Wed December 18, 2013
Around the Nation

A 'Tale Of Two Cities' As Detroit Looks To 2014

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 8:13 am

Detroit's Midtown neighborhood is reviving in the midst of the larger city's decline.
Carlos Osorio AP

The streets outside Avalon Bakery in Detroit's Midtown are a snowy, slushy, mostly unplowed mess, and all these customers want to do is pay for their loaf of Motown Multigrain or Poletown Rye.

But Detroiters are a gracious, if weary, bunch. So when they see yet another reporter sticking a microphone in their faces, asking what they think of all this media attention, they answer politely.

And even if they're not always crazy about the way their city is portrayed, no one argues with the fact that Detroit had a newsworthy year.

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6:44pm

Tue December 17, 2013
Number Of The Year

Prices Are Low, And That Could Be Bad

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 9:34 pm

Superlow inflation means workers often don't see big raises and consumers may delay buying, thinking prices will drop some more.
Kevork Djansezian Reuters/Landov

2.

That's the number the Federal Reserve Board's policymakers wanted to see this year. Having an annual inflation rate of 2 percent would confirm that the U.S. economy is strengthening — workers are getting raises and companies are seeing enough customer demand to mark up prices.

But the 2 percent target turned out to be too high.

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5:40pm

Tue December 17, 2013
Shots - Health News

Why Glaxo Won't Pay Doctors To Sell Its Drugs Anymore

British pharmaceuticals giant GlaxoSmithKline is pledging to revamp its relationships with doctors.
Sang Tan AP

Doctors talking up drugs to other doctors has been quite lucrative for pharmaceutical companies — and the physicians who moonlight as their salesmen.

Drugmakers learned long ago that deputized doctors were effective pitchmen. A doctor paid by a company to give a dinner speech or to chat over lunch with colleagues can go a long way toward changing their prescribing habits.

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5:38pm

Tue December 17, 2013
All Tech Considered

How This Bay Area Tech Boom's Different From The Last One

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 9:22 pm

San Francisco's median home price hit $1 million this year.
Patrick Shyu Flickr

This week, we're exploring the San Francisco Bay Area and the way income inequality is affecting the region. Check out the other pieces of the week, aggregated on this page.

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4:59pm

Tue December 17, 2013
20 Years Of NAFTA

What Has NAFTA Meant For Workers? That Debate's Still Raging

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 12:31 am

An auto worker tightens bolts on a Focus at a Ford plant in Michigan in October. Labor unions predicted in 1993 that NAFTA would send many U.S. manufacturing jobs to Mexico, and they continue to argue that the pact prompted a race to the bottom for workers.
Mira Oberman AFP/Getty Images

Two decades ago, the strongest critics of the North American Free Trade Agreement were members of labor unions. They warned that the trade deal would mean the loss of manufacturing jobs to Mexico and lower wages for U.S. workers.

Today, 20 years since NAFTA's passage, unions feel as strongly as ever that the deal was a bad idea.

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