Business

6:47pm

Wed July 9, 2014
The Two-Way

An Actor, A University And A Famous Name Lead To A Lawsuit

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 6:58 pm

John Wayne went by "Duke" nearly all his life, but that's not the name that appeared on his driver's license.
AP

What do you think of when you hear the name Duke? That question is at the heart of a legal dispute between Duke University and the estate of John Wayne.

Fans of the late film star will recall that he went by the nickname "Duke," which his biographers have pointed out he picked up in childhood from a dog. (He preferred it to his real first name, which was Marion).

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6:38pm

Wed July 9, 2014
All Tech Considered

What Burritos And Sandwiches Can Teach Us About Innovation

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 10:08 am

When there's no bun involved, is it a sandwich? The KFC Double Down is bacon and cheese sandwiched between two pieces of chicken.
Sandra Mu Getty Images

When you slap some meat inside two slices of bread, you have a sandwich, at least according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which enforces the safety and labeling of meat and poultry.

"We're talking about a traditional closed-face sandwich," says Mark Wheeler, who works in food safety at the USDA. "A sandwich is a meat or poultry filling between two slices of bread, a bun or a biscuit."

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5:35pm

Wed July 9, 2014
The Salt

Is Foster Farms A Food Safety Pioneer Or A Persistent Offender?

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 7:19 pm

Foster Farms set up new procedures to deal with salmonella contamination after the USDA threatened to shut down its plants last fall.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Foster Farms, a chicken producer in California, just can't seem to stop bleeding bad news.

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4:11pm

Wed July 9, 2014
Asia

The Ballad Of The 13-Year-Old North Korean Capitalist

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 10:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In North Korea, private businesses are illegal - or at least they're technically illegal. People aren't supposed to buy and sell stuff to each other, but they do it anyway. NPR's Zoe Chace, of our Planet Money team, has this story of a young North Korean woman who knew a business opportunity when she saw it, and had no qualms about pursuing it. One word - socks.

ZOE CHACE, BYLINE: She's just 23 years old. Easily excited, she wears makeup, a bright pink dress, likes to speak a little bit of English.

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7:58am

Wed July 9, 2014
War On Poverty, 50 Years Later

Class Helps Unwed Dads Navigate Ohio's Mom-Friendly Systems

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:43 am

About a quarter of U.S. families are now headed by a single mother.

That means a lot of children without a father in the home, and in some cases, fathers not having much contact with their children.

Research shows a long list of possible problems linked to fathers not being involved in their kid's lives — including poor performance in school, behavioral issues, drug and alcohol abuse and poverty.

To tackle these, Richland County, Ohio, is trying to get fathers more involved.

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7:58am

Wed July 9, 2014
Business

Kickstarter Tater Salad Fund Is No Small Potatoes

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:01 am

Within days of asking for a total of $10 to crowdsource his first potato salad, Ohioan Zack Brown raised tens of thousands of dollars. Apparently he'll be making a lot of potato salad.

6:20am

Wed July 9, 2014
Business

Global Boom In Asset Prices Leads To Worries About Market Bubbles

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:38 am

Renee Montagne talks to David Wessel of the Brookings Institution about the debate over whether the Federal Reserve should raise interest rates to avoid a potential asset bubble.

6:18am

Wed July 9, 2014
Business

Record Recalls May Not Necessarily Hurt Auto Industry

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:01 am

Automakers recalled 37.5 million vehicles in the first six months of 2014. That's more cars and trucks recalled than in any prior year. GM led the way but other companies also picked up the pace.

4:13pm

Tue July 8, 2014
Business

For A Business Built 'On Bended Knee,' Hobby Lobby Ruling Is A Boon

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 6:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

To the politics of religion and the Supreme Court now, and last week's decision in the Hobby Lobby case. The court cleared the way for closely held businesses, whose owners have religious objections to contraceptives, to cut coverage from their employee health plans. And since the court ruled, businesses have been doing just that. NPR's Wade Goodwyn spoke with a couple of company leaders about their decisions.

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3:45pm

Tue July 8, 2014
Shots - Health News

Will This Tech Tool Help Manage Older People's Health? Ask Dad

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 11:39 am

Lively is a sensor that can be attached to a pill box, keys or doors. It lets people know whether aging parents are taking their medicines or sticking to their routines.
Courtesy of Lively

Aging 2.0 may not sound like the hippest start-up in San Francisco, but it's part of an industry worth $2 billion and growing fast — technology to help older adults.

Katy Fike, 35, is the company's co-founder. She's devoted to making sure that older adults who are supposed to use the products are involved in their development.

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