Business

6:11pm

Mon December 8, 2014
The Two-Way

FBI Wanted Little To Do With James Bond, Memo Reveals

Originally published on Tue December 9, 2014 9:36 am

Sean Connery sits beside his co-star, English actress Shirley Eaton, covered in gold, during the filming of a scene from Goldfinger in 1964.
Keystone Getty Images

Auric Goldfinger might have expected James Bond to die, but the FBI wanted nothing to do with 007. That's according to FBI records released today from the agency's vault.

At issue was a request from Harry Saltzman, who with Albert Broccoli produced the Bond films, seeking to use a military aircraft for Goldfinger. In the film, Bond thwarts the title character from stealing the precious metal from Fort Knox. (It was the 1960s, folks.)

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5:06pm

Mon December 8, 2014
Economy

Some Liberals And Tea Partiers Unite To Oppose Trade Deals

Originally published on Mon December 8, 2014 6:15 pm

Protesters of varied stripes and political affiliations gathered outside the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative where negotiators from 12 nations were meeting to discuss the Trans-Pacific Partnership.
James Clark NPR

When it comes to environmental regulations, taxes and the minimum wage, business groups generally object to President Obama's positions, while liberals support him.

But one issue blurs the usual political lines: trade.

Just last week, Obama told the Business Roundtable he would push to complete massive trade deals with both Asian and European nations. "If we can get that done, that's good for American businesses," he said.

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4:58pm

Mon December 8, 2014
Media

'New Republic' Owner Defends Strategy Shift That Led Many To Quit

Originally published on Tue December 9, 2014 10:49 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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4:58pm

Mon December 8, 2014
Business

Big Mac Whacked: McDonald's U.S. Sales Continue To Slide

Originally published on Tue December 9, 2014 1:34 pm

McDonald's says that same-store sales in its U.S. locations dropped nearly 5 percent in November, continuing a downward trend.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

McDonald's is not loving its financial numbers these days. The fast-food chain reported that same-store sales in the U.S. tumbled 4.6 percent in November compared with a year ago, as the company continues to struggle to find solid footing.

"McDonald's news this morning was jarring," says John Gordon, a consultant with Pacific Management Consulting. He has either worked in or tracked the fast-food industry for four decades. Monday's announcement, he says, had his colleagues abuzz.

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4:58pm

Mon December 8, 2014
Food

Olive Oil Producers In 'Crisis' From Weather, Pests And Disease

Originally published on Thu December 18, 2014 6:15 pm

Damaged olives hang in the grove belonging to Augusto Spagnoli, an oil producer from Nerola, near Rome. Producers and experts declared Italy's 2014 olive harvest the worst in history, due to adverse climatic conditions that helped the olive fly proliferate, thus destroying the olives before they could be harvested.
Alessandra Tarantino AP

There's been a dramatic drop in oil production, but it's not barrels of light sweet crude. It's olive oil.

Curtis Cord, publisher of the Olive Oil Times, tells Audie Cornish on All Things Considered there are many reasons why production has fallen so much in Italy and Spain this year.

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4:31pm

Mon December 8, 2014
Business

GOP Leaders: Gas Tax Hike Could Fuel Fixes To Bad Roads And Bridges

Originally published on Tue December 9, 2014 1:57 pm

Thomas Harden of Chicago pumps gas into his truck. He says he wouldn't support a gas tax increase.
David Schaper NPR

Gasoline prices are at their lowest level in four years. The price at the pump in many states is almost a full dollar cheaper than it was last spring.

So some politicians think this is a good time to raise gasoline taxes. Several states are tired of waiting for Congress to fix the federal highway trust fund, so they're considering raising gas taxes themselves to address their crumbling roads.

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3:07pm

Mon December 8, 2014
The Salt

How Afghanistan Vets Are Trying To Cultivate Peace Through Saffron

Originally published on Mon December 8, 2014 6:02 pm

At about $15 a gram, saffron is the world's most expensive spice. Rumi Spice has a unique model of employing Afghan farmers who are growing it that aims to double or even triple their annual income.
Cristina Hirschkorn Courtesy of Rumi Spice

When you think of saffron, dark red strands from Spain or Iran may come to mind. But the delicate spice, one of the most expensive and labor-intensive in the world, grows well in another country long plagued by conflict: Afghanistan.

Rumi Spice, a small, enterprising company in Brighton, Mass., is trying to build an Afghan saffron connection for lovers of the spice in the U.S., and cultivate peace through trade.

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1:05pm

Mon December 8, 2014
The Salt

Fringe No More: 'Ancient Grains' Will Soon Be A Cheerios Variety

Originally published on Wed December 10, 2014 10:26 am

The new box of Cheerios + Ancient grains cereal.
General Mills

So-called "ancient grains" have moved with breathtaking momentum from America's culinary dissident fringe toward the mainstream — and now they've arrived. After all, what's more mainstream than Cheerios? In January, General Mills will introduce a new version of its flagship breakfast cereal, called Cheerios + Ancient Grains.

The new version of Cheerios will contain small amounts of quinoa, Kamut wheat and spelt along with the traditional oats.

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12:51pm

Mon December 8, 2014
The Two-Way

Supreme Court Rejects BP's Challenge To Gulf Oil Spill Settlement

Originally published on Mon December 8, 2014 3:13 pm

The Deepwater Horizon oil rig burned on April 21, 2010.
U.S. Coast Guard Getty Images

Oil giant BP has suffered a legal setback in its effort to limit how much the company will pay under a 2012 settlement with thousands of individuals and businesses along the Gulf Coast. Without comment, the U.S. Supreme Court rejected BP's request that it review previous lower court decisions that favored plaintiffs.

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11:31am

Mon December 8, 2014
The Two-Way

IOC Unveils Changes Including Lower Bidding Costs, More Sports At Olympics

A reduced cost of bidding, a new Olympic channel and a more flexible program that could see the inclusion of new sports — those are among the recommendation approved unanimously today by the International Olympic Committee at its meeting in Monaco.

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