Business

7:07am

Thu April 3, 2014
Politics

In Ann Arbor, Obama Gathers Support For Minimum Wage Hike

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:53 am

The Senate could vote on a minimum wage bill as soon as next week. But it is hard to imagine the Republican-controlled House will take it up.

6:11am

Thu April 3, 2014
Business

Odds Aren't Improving For Long-Term Unemployed Workers

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:53 am

There is still be a huge number of people who have been out of work for six months or more. Steve Inskeep talks to David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center at the Brookings Institution.

6:07am

Thu April 3, 2014
Business

Amazon Unveils Fire TV, Its Video Streaming Device

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:53 am

Amazon is making an aggressive move toward your living room TV with a new video-streaming device. Amazon Fire TV joins a crowded field of devices vying for the same spot.

5:13am

Thu April 3, 2014
Business

Chemical Spill In W. Va. Tests Tolerance For Big Coal

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 10:27 am

Linda Wertheimer talks to Evan Osnos about his New Yorker piece in which he explores how the coal industry has become a political player in the state, and what that could mean for future regulation.

Read more

3:38am

Thu April 3, 2014
Paying For College

First Test For College Hopefuls? Decoding Financial Aid Letters

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 10:43 am

Colleges send each prospective student a letter detailing a financial aid award package — but many families say the letters are difficult to understand.
iStockphoto

Around the country, millions of parents of prospective college freshmen are puzzling over one big question: How will we pay for college?

The first step for many families is reviewing the financial aid award letters they receive from each school. But often those letters can be confusing. Some are filled with acronyms and abbreviations, others lump scholarships and loans together. And because they're often very different, they're also difficult to compare.

Read more

6:24pm

Wed April 2, 2014
The Salt

Stop, Thief! When Colleagues Steal From The Office Fridge

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 9:54 pm

"Too darn funny what a co-worker put on top of her lunch. It was fake of course, but got the point across."
Courtesy of Toni Kinnard

As a wedding planner, Jeanne Hamilton saw her share of very bad manners — people who made her think, "There should be an etiquette hell for people like you."

And bingo! That was the beginning of her website, Etiquette Hell, a repository of more than 6,000 firsthand accounts of bad behavior people witness in their fellow peers.

And the most frequent complaint? Fridge theft. It's rampant, apparently, in offices all over the world.

Read more

6:24pm

Wed April 2, 2014
Business

Traders Defend High-Speed Systems Against Charges Of Rigging

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 9:54 pm

"The stock market is rigged," says Michael Lewis, and high-frequency traders are to blame. But defenders of high-speed trading say it plays a legitimate role.
Paul Giamou iStockphoto

The FBI and the Securities and Exchange Commission revealed this week that they're both investigating the world of high-frequency stock trading. They did so at a time when a new book on the subject, Flash Boys by Michael Lewis, is causing an uproar on Wall Street.

To read Lewis' book is to be reminded of how drastically the stock market has changed in a decade — and how opaque it remains. Lewis says this opacity serves to cover up some disturbing developments.

Read more

4:08pm

Wed April 2, 2014
Deep In The Heart Of (A Transforming) Texas

Cycling's Catching On In Texas, For A Very Texas Reason

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 9:54 pm

Bicycles and pedicabs along a dedicated bike lane in Austin, Texas.
Elise Hu NPR

For years, cyclists have faced long odds in Texas, where sprawling highways teem with trucks. Dallas was ranked the worst city for bicycling in the country, several years in a row. But in recent years, the two-wheeled form of transportation has begun to gain ground.

It's no surprise that progressive Austin — where the disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong still lives — has plenty of cyclists.

Read more

3:28pm

Wed April 2, 2014
The Salt

Should We Close Part Of The Ocean To Keep Fish On The Plate?

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 5:55 pm

A tuna fishing boat drags a cage of nets on the Mediterranean sea in 2010. (The Mediterranean is not considered to be part of the "high seas.")
Andreas Solaro AFP/Getty Images

For lovers of fatty tuna belly, canned albacore and swordfish kebabs, here's a question: Would you be willing to give them up for several years so that you could eat them perhaps for the rest of your life?

If a new proposal to ban fishing on the open ocean were to fly, that's essentially what we might be faced with. It's an idea that might help restore the populations of several rapidly disappearing fish – like tuna, swordfish and marlin — that we, and future generations, might like to continue to have as a food source.

Read more

1:14pm

Wed April 2, 2014
The Two-Way

GM Has 'Culture Of Cover-Up,' Key Senator Says

General Motors CEO Mary Barra as she testified Wednesday on Capitol Hill.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Day Two of General Motors CEO Mary Barra's time testifying before Congress about safety problems with her company's cars has been highlighted by a top senator saying the company "repeatedly lied" about its problems and has fostered a "culture of cover-up."

From The Detroit News:

Read more

Pages