Business

9:49am

Fri April 24, 2015
TED Radio Hour

What Happens When You Run a Company With (Almost) No Rules?

"Why does everyone have to be here at the same time? Why do we need to know how many hours a week people work?" — Ricardo Semler
James Duncan Davidson TED

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Getting Organized

About Ricardo Semler's TED Talk

When Ricardo Semler became the CEO of his father's company, he reorganized it with the belief that less management and more flexibility meant a better workplace and bigger profits.

About Ricardo Semler

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9:41am

Fri April 24, 2015
The Two-Way

Comcast Cuts The Cord On Deal With Time Warner Cable

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 3:04 pm

Updated at 9:40 a.m. ET

Comcast Corp. announced Friday that it's ending its merger agreement with Time Warner Cable — after the Justice Department raised concerns over a deal.

"Today, we move on," Comcast Chairman and CEO Brian L. Roberts said in a statement. "Of course, we would have liked to bring our great products to new cities, but we structured this deal so that if the government didn't agree, we could walk away."

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7:05am

Fri April 24, 2015
Business

2 Years After Garment Factory Collapse, Are Workers Any Safer?

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 3:25 pm

Two years after the collapse of the factory at Rana Plaza, families of victims gather, holding photos of their lost loved ones.
Amy Yee for NPR

Beneath a gray sky, rainwater had collected in a hole in the ground where Rana Plaza once stood, creating a small, murky pond. Rubble and pieces of steel bars surrounded the edge of the water. It was hard to believe that this small lot, steps away from a busy main road, was once home to an eight-story building with thousands of garment workers.

The nondescript place did not look like the site of the world's worst garment factory disaster. Two years ago on April 24, Rana Plaza collapsed, killing more than 1,100 people and injuring 2,500.

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6:09am

Fri April 24, 2015
Code Switch

A Look At 'Blackbird,' The First Film On The New 'Black Netflix'

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 12:27 pm

Blackbird is about a gay interracial romance set in the deep South.
courtesy of blackbirdthemovie.com

A tiny independent movie has been picked by one of Hollywood's biggest moguls to promote his latest venture. Robert L. Johnson created BET and now, the Urban Movie Channel — an online channel that's being called the black Netflix.

The first original film it has acquired is a gay interracial romance set in the Deep South. In Blackbird, the main character Randy is in high school. Everyone thinks he's gay, and they're totally fine with it.

Randy, 18, is fervently religious. Even though his best friend is gay, Randy's in denial about his own sexuality.

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4:34am

Fri April 24, 2015
All Tech Considered

Will Apple's Newest Gadget Ignite A Smart Watch Movement?

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 9:11 pm

As the Apple Watch goes on sale Friday, it's unclear if the gadget and others like it can attain the utility and prominence smartphones have in the past eight years.
Ryan Emberley AP

The Apple Watch is making quite a splash with its launch Friday, but most of us have never thought about this new gadget, the "smart watch." Is it a luxury item, or is the smart watch destined to be the next great essential, something we don't know we'll need but will.

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3:23am

Fri April 24, 2015
Art & Design

Slow Fashion Shows Consumers What It's Made Of

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 1:15 pm

The Zady clothing line sources cotton from the Texas Organic Cotton Cooperative in Lubbock, Texas.
Zady

If you're into "slow food" — the ethical response to "fast food" — you probably want to know how the animals were treated or whether pesticides were used on your vegetables. Now, the "slow fashion" movement is in the same spirit.

"It's about understanding the process or the origins of how things are made," says Soraya Darabi, co-founder of the clothing line Zady. "Where our products come from, how they're constructed and by whom. Slow fashion is really indicative of a movement of people who want to literally slow down."

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7:54pm

Thu April 23, 2015
The Two-Way

SkyWest Now Says Several Passengers Were Ill On Diverted Flight

SkyWest Airlines says three passengers lost consciousness on a plane, operating as United Express, that made an emergency landing in Buffalo on Wednesday.
Gary Wiepert AP

Officials at SkyWest Airlines and federal authorities say they still don't know what caused three passengers to lose consciousness on a flight that then made an emergency landing in Buffalo Wednesday. Earlier, the airline said one passenger was affected.

The SkyWest plane, operating as United Express flight #5622, was flying from Chicago's O'Hare airport to Hartford, Connecticut with 75 passengers on board.

Some passengers say part way into the flight, they started having trouble breathing, and felt dizzy and nauseous.

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6:55pm

Thu April 23, 2015
The Two-Way

Delinquent Mines: Congress Revives Bill To Hold Mine Owners Accountable

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 7:01 am

Federal lawmakers have revived a mine safety reform bill that addresses a regulatory failure detailed in a joint investigation by NPR and Mine Safety and Health News.

The Robert C. Byrd Mine Safety Protection Act includes a provision that directly addresses the Mine Safety and Health Administration's (MSHA) failure to fully enforce penalties for safety violations at the nation's mines.

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6:09pm

Thu April 23, 2015
All Tech Considered

Biometrics May Ditch The Password, But Not The Hackers

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:03 pm

Biometrics are increasingly replacing the password for user identification.
iStockphoto

Passwords get hacked — a lot. In an effort to move beyond passwords, big companies are embracing biometric technology: the use of fingerprints, iris scans or voice recognition for user identification.

To heighten security, smartphones are being outfitted with biometric features. But, ditching passwords for biometrics may not make the hackers go away.

Selfie Security

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5:21pm

Thu April 23, 2015
Animals

Return Of Horses A Sign Of Spring On Michigan Island

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 11:00 am

Every spring, hundreds of horses are ferried from their winter hiatus in the Upper Peninsula for a good grooming and harness fitting, before beginning their summer jobs pulling carriages.
Amy Robinson WCMU

Spring has a lot of faces around the country, like the cherry blossoms in Washington, D.C., and the sap run in Vermont. On one Michigan island, it's horses that are the harbinger of the season.

Mackinac Island draws a million visitors a year for its scenery, fudge and horses. Cars aren't allowed on the island, and every spring, hundreds of horses are ferried from their winter hiatus in the Upper Peninsula for a good grooming and harness fitting, before beginning their summer jobs pulling carriages.

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