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Sure, he can chop open a coconut with a bare hand, carry a piglet through a cramped alleyway, dive into a well to retrieve a lost soccer ball — but has he won the lifetime achievement award, twice?

Does his blood smell like cologne? Is there a sandwich named after him on every continent

Does he bowl overhand?

Dos Equis has revealed the new face of its wildly popular "Most Interesting Man in the World" ad campaign.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In North Dakota, work has stopped on one section of the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline. Still, over the weekend protesters continued to stream into camps set up near the construction site.

One protest camp is about an hour's drive south of Bismarck. A prairie there is covered with tepees, tents and RVs. Flags from tribes around the country line the dirt road into the camp.

If you ever saw a Crazy Eddie commercial, then you know the electronics retail giant's prices were "insane!"

At its height, the chain had 43 stores in four states. Eddie Antar started the chain in 1969 with a store in Brooklyn, N.Y. The chain's growth was helped by the introduction of the VCR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RAY SUAREZ, HOST:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Marijuana Pays For Schools In Colorado — Kind Of — But How Will It Help Maine?

Sep 10, 2016

Voters in Maine and a handful of other states are deciding whether to legalize recreational marijuana this November. One thing that could swing the vote is the possibility of millions of dollars in tax revenue from retail marijuana sales. Colorado was the first state in the country to roll out a tax scheme for legal marijuana in 2013, after recreational marijuana was legalized in 2012. So how are voters in Colorado spending the cash, and what should Maine voters expect?

Louisiana Flooding Swamps Agriculture

Sep 10, 2016

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

As Louisiana continues the clean-up of flood-damaged buildings and homes, farmers face another set of problems. Many corn, soybean, sugar and rice fields were flooded with several feet of water. As Tegan Wendland at member station WWNO reports, farmers are trying to figure out what comes next.

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