Business news

Ellen Kullman, the CEO of the chemical company DuPont, said Monday that she will retire on Oct. 16. The announcement follows falling stock prices as the company struggles in the global economy.

Edward Breen, a DuPont board member, will serve as Kullman's interim replacement.

NPR's Chris Arnold reports on the leadership change.

American Apparel, the trendy clothing company perhaps best known for its racy, sexually charged ads, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Monday.

The made-in-the-U.S.A. clothing chain announced it had reached an agreement with 95 percent of its secured lenders to put in place what it is calling "a comprehensive transformation strategy to revitalize the business and brand." The company says it will keep production and operations in the U.S.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Updated 5:30 p.m. ET

Extinguishing hope that the cargo ship that went missing near the Bahamas could have survived a Thursday encounter with Hurricane Joaquin, the Coast Guard announced Monday that the ship, El Faro, sank, according to the Associated Press. The Coast Guard also found an unidentified body of one crew member.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



"We, the trade ministers ... are pleased to announce that we have successfully concluded the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiation," U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman announced Monday morning, to a loud round of applause.

Federal and state claims against BP for the April 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill have been resolved, the Justice Department says, with the oil and gas company agreeing to pay more than $20 billion in penalties.

Our friends over at Planet Money built this interactive graphic that illuminates yet another aspect of the Education Department's new College Scorecard. It shows the average annual price that families actually pay at 1,550 four-year colleges, by income.

Women concerned about their fertility can use a test to help decide whether they should freeze their eggs now or whether they still have time to have a baby.

When Virginia farmer Charles Martin first got into the pumpkin game a decade ago, he started small, with a half-acre plot of traditional round, orange jack-o-lanterns. Today he grows 55 varieties of gourds, squash and pumpkins, and he's always looking for something new.