Phil Chess, co-founder of the iconic Chicago blues and rock 'n' roll label Chess Records, died Wednesday in Tucson, Ariz. He was 95.

Phil and his brother, Leonard Chess, emigrated to the U.S. from Poland in 1928. Chess Records biographer Nadine Cohodas told their story to NPR in 2000.

"It was a scrappy kind of existence," Cohodas said of the Chess brothers' early years in Chicago. "Their father was very determined and he opened a junk shop, as did many other immigrants from Eastern Europe."

Peter Wolf On World Cafe

Oct 17, 2016

In this session, Peter Wolf, the former frontman of Boston's The J. Geils Band, performs songs from his new solo album, A Cure For Loneliness, released this past April. Wolf is a wise man and a music lifer. Originally from New York, he moved to Boston to study painting on a fine arts scholarship and ended up playing in a number of blues and R&B bands. He also worked as the overnight DJ at WBCN.

Luther Dickinson On World Cafe

Aug 10, 2016

Luther Dickinson of the North Mississippi Allstars had an unusual childhood: He and his brother, drummer Cody Dickinson, are the sons of legendary Memphis producer and pianist Jim Dickinson, who notably played piano on The Rolling Stones' "Wild Horses." The family lived south of Memphis in the Mississippi hill country, a cultural pocket whose distinctive blues style is exemplified by the playing of Fred McDowell,

World Cafe Next: The Marcus King Band

Aug 1, 2016

From the first note of The Marcus King Band's self-titled Fantasy Records debut, you can hear that this guy is an old soul. It might be a surprise, then, to learn that the singer and guitarist is only 22 years old. King grew up in South Carolina, where he played sideman to blues musicians and honed his formidable talent.

Moreland & Arbuckle On World Cafe

Jul 29, 2016

When harmonica ace Dustin Arbuckle met guitarist Aaron Moreland at an open mic in their hometown of Wichita, Kan., the two immediately decided that they'd better combine talents. That was in 2001, and they've been playing roadhouse blues together ever since.

Bonnie Raitt On World Cafe

Jul 27, 2016

Right from the beginning, Bonnie Raitt has had an ear for great songs. Over the years. she's mined the work of John Prine, Jackson Browne, John Hiatt, Paul Brady and others. When she couldn't find the right songs, she'd write them herself, and she's sung them all with a soulful delivery.

C.W. Stoneking On World Cafe

Jun 23, 2016

Blues singer-songwriter C.W. Stoneking is touring the U.S. for the first time this summer, but he's been well known in Australia for over 20 years. His last record, Gon' Boogaloo, even earned him a ARIA Award (the Australian equivalent of a Grammy) for Best Blues and Roots Album.

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify playlist at the bottom of the page.

Songhoy Blues On World Cafe

May 25, 2016

Songhoy Blues started when, displaced from their homes in the north of Mali, members Garba Touré, Oumar Touré and Aliou Touré fled Timbuktu in 2012 and traveled to Bamako, where they decided to form a band to play for fellow refugees. Songhoy Blues' instrumentation — two guitars, bass and drums —represents a younger person's take on more traditional desert-blues bands.

On Saturday night, Beyoncé shook the music world with an hourlong feature on HBO, and then a surprise album — Lemonade.

Beyoncé couldn't have produced a body of work this defiant, or blunt, two years ago. Lemonade has been made possible by the cultural, social and political upheaval we're in the midst of, triggered by the deaths of boys and fathers and women, who will never be forgotten.