Arts

1:32pm

Thu August 2, 2012
Book Reviews

A Moody Tale Of Murder In A 'Broken' Dublin Suburb

Originally published on Thu August 2, 2012 4:18 pm

Broken window.
iStockphoto.com

Mid-20th-century mystery master Ross MacDonald is credited with moving hard-boiled crime off the mean streets of American cities and smack into the suburbs. In MacDonald's mythical California town of Santa Teresa, modeled on Santa Barbara, evil noses its way into gated communities, schools and shopping centers that have been built expressly to escape the dirt and danger of the city.

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1:20pm

Thu August 2, 2012
Author Interviews

Not A Feminist? Caitlin Moran Asks, Why Not?

Originally published on Thu August 2, 2012 9:03 pm

iStockphoto.com

Writer Caitlin Moran believes most women who don't want to be called feminists don't really understand what feminism is. In her book How to Be a Woman, Moran poses these questions to women who are hesitant to identify as feminists:

What part of liberation for women is not for you? Is it the freedom to vote? The right not to be owned by the man that you marry? The campaign for equal pay? Vogue by Madonna? Jeans? Did all that stuff just get on your nerves?

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11:01am

Thu August 2, 2012
Book Reviews

Jaime Hernandez Bridges The Indie-Vs.-Cape Divide

Originally published on Thu August 2, 2012 12:56 pm

If only Nixon could go to China, only indie-comics master Jaime Hernandez could produce God and Science: Return of the Ti-Girls, the brightest, purest, most quintessentially superheroic superhero yarn in years.

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7:13am

Thu August 2, 2012
Pop Culture

R Grammar Gaffes Ruining The Language? Maybe Not

Originally published on Thu August 2, 2012 12:32 pm

Sharon Dominick iStockphoto.com

Good grammar may have came and went.

Maybe you've winced at the decline of the past participle. Or folks writing and saying "he had sank" and "she would have went." Perhaps it was the singer Gotye going on about "Somebody That I Used to Know" instead of "Somebody Whom I Used to Know." Or any of a number of other tramplings of traditional grammar — rules that have been force-fed to American schoolchildren for decades — in popular parlance and prose.

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7:03am

Thu August 2, 2012
New In Paperback

New In Paperback July 30-Aug. 5

Originally published on Thu August 2, 2012 11:32 am

Nonfiction releases from Scott Wallace, Joshua S. Goldstein, Catherine Salmon, Katrin Schumann and Julie Salamon.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

5:32am

Thu August 2, 2012
Food

Name That (New) Grape

Researchers at Cornell University will be releasing two new wine grape varieties next year from the university's agricultural breeding program. And they're asking the public to create names for them.

5:13am

Thu August 2, 2012
Destination Art

Marfa, Texas: An Unlikely Art Oasis In A Desert Town

Originally published on Thu August 2, 2012 6:36 pm

In the 1970s, minimalist artist Donald Judd moved to Marfa, Texas, where he created giant works of art that bask beneath vast desert skies. In the years since, Marfa has emerged as a hot spot for art tourism.
Art (c) Judd Foundation Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

This tiny town perched on the high plains of the Chihuahua desert is nothing less than an arts world station of the cross, like Art Basel in Miami, or Documenta in Germany. It's a blue-chip arts destination for the sort of glamorous scenesters who visit Amsterdam for the Rijksmuseum and the drugs.

"They speak about Marfa with the same kind of reverent tones generally reserved for the pilgrimage of the Virgin of Lourdes," notes Carolina Miranda, a writer who covers the art world.

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5:18pm

Wed August 1, 2012
Poetry Games

'The Wrestler' Grapples With Myth, Power And Love

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 10:15 am

Ron Tanovitz

A Muslim-American poet and novelist of Indian descent, Kazim Ali's work has been featured in Best American Poetry and the American Poetry Review. He teaches at Oberlin College.

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3:01pm

Wed August 1, 2012
The Salt

'Sweet Child O' Mine,' Julia Child Mash-Up Honors America's First Top Chef

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 11:31 am

Julia Child prepares a French delicacy in her cooking studio on Nov. 24, 1970.
AP

Julia Child, the woman credited with singlehandedly teaching America how to cook, would have turned 100 years old on August 15 this year.

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2:59pm

Wed August 1, 2012
Destination Art

What's Your Favorite Arts Town?

Originally published on Thu August 2, 2012 3:29 pm

Brian Santa Maria iStockphoto.com

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