Arts

10:14am

Tue August 21, 2012
Monkey See

Let's Rush To Judgment: 'Liberal Arts'

Josh Radnor has been playing the much-maligned — and I would perhaps say overly maligned — Ted Mosby on How I Met Your Mother since 2005. We've known for a while that he's ultimately interested in being a filmmaker — his 2010 film Happythankyoumoreplease got mixed reviews, but won an Audience Award at the Sundance Film Festival.

Read more

7:03am

Tue August 21, 2012
Book Reviews

'Winter Journal': Paul Auster On Aging, Mortality

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 3:13 pm

Paul Auster is the author of fiction including The New York Trilogy and In the Country of Last Things.
Lotte Hansen Picador

"You think it will never happen to you," Paul Auster writes about aging and mortality in Winter Journal, penned during the winter of 2011, when he turned 64. Thirty years ago, Auster followed several volumes of poetry with The Invention of Solitude, an unconventional, profoundly literary meditation on life, death and memory triggered in part by the sudden death of his remote father and in part by the breakup of his first marriage to the short story writer Lydia Davis.

Read more

5:31pm

Mon August 20, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Dr. Seuss On Malaria: 'This is Ann ... She Drinks Blood'

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 10:34 am

During World War II, Capt. Theodor Geisel — better known as Dr. Seuss — created a small booklet explaining how to prevent mosquito bites.
Theodor Geisel Courtesy of USDA

Before he cooked up green eggs or taught us to count colorful fish, Dr. Seuss was a captain in the U.S. Army. And during World War II, the author and illustrator, whose given name was Theodor Geisel, spent a few years creating training films and pamphlets for the troops.

One of Geisel's Army cartoons was a booklet aimed at preventing malaria outbreaks among GIs by urging them to use nets and keep covered up.

Read more

4:20pm

Mon August 20, 2012
Destination Art

North Adams, Mass.: A Manufacturing Town For Art

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 3:06 pm

MASS MoCA is a complex of 26 renovated 19th-century factory buildings. The site was formerly the home of Arnold Print Works (1860-1942) and Sprague Electric Company (1942-1985).
MASS MoCA

If you ever decide to visit one of the largest museums of contemporary art in the world, prepare yourself: It's a little intimidating. First, you have to drive to upper Massachusetts, just south of the Vermont border, where you'll behold 26 hulking brick buildings: We're talking 600,000 square feet of raw, sunlit space, roughly equivalent to a mid-sized airport.

Read more

4:13pm

Mon August 20, 2012
NewsPoet: Writing The Day In Verse

NewsPoet: Tess Taylor Writes The Day In Verse

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 6:38 pm

Tess Taylor visits NPR headquarters in Washington on Monday.
Emily Bogle NPR

Today at All Things Considered, we continue a project we're calling NewsPoet. Each month, we bring in a poet to spend time in the newsroom — and at the end of the day, to compose a poem reflecting on the day's stories.

Read more

3:29pm

Mon August 20, 2012
Remembrances

Comedy's Self-Deprecating Pioneer Phyllis Diller Dies

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 6:02 pm

Diller poses with a photo at her Los Angeles home in 2005.
Chris Pizzello AP

A queen of comedy has died. Phyllis Diller had audiences in stitches for more than five decades with her outlandish get-ups and rapid-fire one-liners. She died at her home, where she had been in hospice care after a fall. She was 95.

Diller was glamorously outrageous — or at least the character she created was glamorously outrageous, the one who wore wigs that made her look like she had her finger in an electrical outlet, who wore gaudy sequined outfits. She was known for her laugh and those nasty jokes about her dimwitted husband, "Fang."

Read more

2:42pm

Mon August 20, 2012
Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me!

Sandwich Monday: The Energy Bar Sandwich

The components.
NPR

A few of us are doing a 5K tonight (burger-themed, of course), and rather than doing any training whatsoever, we're getting ready with our very own Energy Bar Sandwich. Luna Bar bread, a Clif Bar patty, topped with a Powerbar, carbohydrate goo and something called Clif Shot Bloks. It adds up to 1,200 calories, more than twice that of a Big Mac.

Ian: This sandwich tastes like exercise feels.

Read more

1:58pm

Mon August 20, 2012
Movie Interviews

Mike Birbiglia, 'Sleepwalk'-ing On The Big Screen

Comedian Mike Birbiglia co-wrote the script for the new film about himself: Sleepwalk With Me.
Brian Friedman

When comedian Mike Birbiglia opened his one-man show Sleepwalk With Me in 2008 at the Bleecker Street Theatre in New York, he didn't anticipate that it would become material for a popular piece on This American Life and a New York Times best-seller. He especially didn't think it would turn into a feature film.

Birbigilia had never made a film before. And he was initially hesitant to make one about his dangerous sleepwalking condition, because he wanted to distance himself from the topic he had been immersed in for more than four years.

Read more

1:50pm

Mon August 20, 2012
Remembrances

The Adrenalized Action And Cult Films Of Tony Scott

Tony Scott's breakout hit was Top Gun, a drama about fighter pilots in training, starring Tom Cruise.
AP

When people talk about Tony Scott's movies, the same words often come up: stylish, exuberant and kinetic. Three years ago, in a video interview with The Guardian, Scott explained why watching his movies could sometimes be exhausting.

"I have this natural energy that I want to inject into what I do," he said. "The worlds that I touch, I sort of embrace those worlds, and I always look for that energetic side of the worlds that I'm touching."

Read more

7:03am

Mon August 20, 2012
PG-13: Risky Reads

Slaughter In The Subway: A Tale Of New York Terror

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 4:12 pm

Victor LaValle's latest novel is called The Devil in Silver.

"I have seen the future of horror ... and it is named Clive Barker."

It was the mid '80s. I was in my local comic book store. I remember seeing those words on the paperback cover of a book. The image of a cheap, rubber-looking mask with its mouth hanging open and its eyes empty was on the front. A purple light glowed behind the mask. It wasn't frightening. The cover looked crappy. And the name, Clive Barker, meant nothing to me. I might've passed it by if not for the name under the blurb: Stephen King.

Read more

Pages