Arts

5:03pm

Tue August 21, 2012
Movies

A Put-Upon Hardbody, But A 'Teddy Bear' At Heart

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 8:33 pm

Bodybuilder Dennis (Kim Kold) and gym owner Toi (Lamaiporn Sangmanee Hougaard) share a tender moment.
Film Movement

Set in contemporary Denmark and in Thailand, Mads Matthiesen's Teddy Bear is a sweetly muted domestic drama struggling to contain a fierce and ancient folk tale.

The hero, Dennis — a 300-pound bodybuilder with a lovable touch of Shrek — has an absent father and a tiny witch of a mother whose parenting is a twisted cocktail of dominatrix and coquette. (If your mother conducted bathroom business with you alongside at age 38, you'd have issues too.)

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4:31pm

Tue August 21, 2012
Participation Nation

Painting The Town In Arkadelphia, Ark.

Tonkawa Tribal members add paint to the mural in Oklahoma.
Courtesy of MAMP

Through the traveling Mid-America Murals Project, "artists are working with small communities to translate their stories into dynamic visual poems on the walls of downtown buildings," says the project's lead artist Dave Loewenstein.

The group has already created colorful murals in Joplin, Mo., Newton, Kan. and Tonkawa, Okla.

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2:12pm

Tue August 21, 2012
Monkey See

'Persona 4 Arena' Digs Deep Into The Teenage Heart Of Battle

Persona 4 Arena
Atlus
PlayStation 3, Xbox 360
Reviewed on PlayStation 3

The quirky, the odd and the eerie. As a videogame publisher, Atlus has become the expert in making the strange into the popular. It released Demon's Souls, a horror-filled role playing game that was so unrepentantly unforgiving, even hard core gamers complained (even as they continued playing). Last year, Atlus' Catherine was a long meditation upon the nightmarish angst and fear that can emerge when trust fails a young relationship.

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2:10pm

Tue August 21, 2012
Author Interviews

Student 'Subversives' And The FBI's 'Dirty Tricks'

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 1:21 pm

Mario Savio, shown here at a victory rally in UC Berkeley's Sproul Plaza on Dec. 9, 1964, was the face of the free speech movement.
AP

In 1964, students at the University of California, Berkeley, formed a protest movement to repeal a campus rule banning students from engaging in political activities.

Then-FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover suspected the free speech movement to be evidence of a Communist plot to disrupt U.S. campuses. He "had long been concerned about alleged subversion within the education field," journalist Seth Rosenfeld tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

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1:52pm

Tue August 21, 2012
Remembrances

Fresh Air Remembers Comedian Phyllis Diller

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 2:35 pm

Phyllis Diller plays peekaboo with the cameraman before the start of her television show Bonkers in 1979.
Central Press/Getty Images

Phyllis Diller, one of the first and one of the few female comic headliners of her generation, died Monday at the age of 95.

Diller performed in the persona of a crazed housewife. She usually dressed in outlandish, bad-fitting clothes with her hair teased into a disheveled mop. Then she'd fire off long strings of self-deprecating gags. She was so unattractive, she used to tell her audiences, that Peeping Toms asked her to pull her window shades down. Onstage, she called her husband Fang. Diller told Fang jokes like her male counterparts told wife jokes.

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12:13pm

Tue August 21, 2012
Monkey See

Michael J. Fox Gets A New Comedy: Has NBC Found A Way To Make Some Progress?

Michael J. Fox, seen here in April, will have a new NBC comedy in the fall of 2013.
Andrew H. Walker Getty Images

NBC is in need of a stroke of luck. They need something to work. The Olympics are over; it hasn't appreciably changed anything yet, and there's certainly no swell of excitement about Animal Practice and Go On that leads me to believe previewing them during the Olympics will make them hits any more than that strategy usually does.

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10:50am

Tue August 21, 2012
The Picture Show

Photos From The Sets Of Latin American Soap Operas

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 4:13 pm

Yadhira Carrillo as Leonora "Nora" Guzman Madrigal de Orta de Palacios-Garcia in Amarte Es Mi Pecado (Loving You Is My Sin)
Stefan Ruiz

If you've spent even a few minutes watching a telenovela, or Latin American soap opera, you're familiar with some of the archetypes: the swarthy, good-looking country man; the maid; the poor peasant woman (generally devoid of indigenous features); the evil rich girl, etc. For better or worse, it's a huge part of Latino culture, and photographer Stefan Ruiz wanted to document it.

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10:14am

Tue August 21, 2012
Monkey See

Let's Rush To Judgment: 'Liberal Arts'

Josh Radnor has been playing the much-maligned — and I would perhaps say overly maligned — Ted Mosby on How I Met Your Mother since 2005. We've known for a while that he's ultimately interested in being a filmmaker — his 2010 film Happythankyoumoreplease got mixed reviews, but won an Audience Award at the Sundance Film Festival.

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7:03am

Tue August 21, 2012
Book Reviews

'Winter Journal': Paul Auster On Aging, Mortality

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 3:13 pm

Paul Auster is the author of fiction including The New York Trilogy and In the Country of Last Things.
Lotte Hansen Picador

"You think it will never happen to you," Paul Auster writes about aging and mortality in Winter Journal, penned during the winter of 2011, when he turned 64. Thirty years ago, Auster followed several volumes of poetry with The Invention of Solitude, an unconventional, profoundly literary meditation on life, death and memory triggered in part by the sudden death of his remote father and in part by the breakup of his first marriage to the short story writer Lydia Davis.

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5:31pm

Mon August 20, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Dr. Seuss On Malaria: 'This is Ann ... She Drinks Blood'

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 10:34 am

During World War II, Capt. Theodor Geisel — better known as Dr. Seuss — created a small booklet explaining how to prevent mosquito bites.
Theodor Geisel Courtesy of USDA

Before he cooked up green eggs or taught us to count colorful fish, Dr. Seuss was a captain in the U.S. Army. And during World War II, the author and illustrator, whose given name was Theodor Geisel, spent a few years creating training films and pamphlets for the troops.

One of Geisel's Army cartoons was a booklet aimed at preventing malaria outbreaks among GIs by urging them to use nets and keep covered up.

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