Arts

5:20pm

Tue October 2, 2012
Author Interviews

In 'House,' Erdrich Sets Revenge On A Reservation

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 6:14 pm

iStockphoto.com

In 1988, 13-year-old Joe Coutts is thrust into adulthood after his mother, Geraldine Coutts, is sexually assaulted. His story is at the center of Louise Erdrich's latest novel, The Round House.

Read more

1:23pm

Tue October 2, 2012
The Fresh Air Interview

Paul Thomas Anderson, The Man Behind 'The Master'

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 10:38 am

Paul Thomas Anderson (left) works with actor Joaquin Phoenix on the set of The Master.
Phil Bray The Weinstein Co.

For Paul Thomas Anderson, moviemaking is not just an art; it's also about time management.

"At its best, a film set is when everybody knows what's going on and everybody's working together," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "At its worst, [it's] when something's been lost in communication and an actor's not sure how many shots are left or what's going on, and the makeup department's confused."

Read more

11:40am

Tue October 2, 2012
Author Interviews

Stacy London: Dangerous To Call Style Superficial

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 9:55 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now, we turn to the clothing industry, where finding the right style doesn't necessarily mean spending big bucks. So says Stacy London, at least. She's known for co-hosting TLC's hit TV show "What Not to Wear." We've watched her transform the looks and lives of hundreds of guests.

Read more

9:24am

Tue October 2, 2012
Monkey See

When It Comes To Character Detail, 'Pitch Perfect' Nails It

Anna Kendrick in Pitch Perfect.
Peter Iovino Universal Pictures

Pitch Perfect, the new comedy that opened in some cities last Friday and goes wider this Friday, is set in a world very close to my own heart: college a cappella.

I know, I know — it's dorky, it's silly, you hated those people at your school — I get it. But I loved it when I did it, and even now, I carry around a few of these compilations on my phone.

But as much as I enjoyed all the singing (and I did), it's not how the film won me over. What won me over was Beca's raggedy manicure.

Read more

7:03am

Tue October 2, 2012
Book Reviews

Details Weigh Down The Drama In 'Live By Night'

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 11:28 am

William Morrow

A short list of mishaps that befall characters in Live by Night, Dennis Lehane's new novel: stabbed with a potato peeler ("It sounded like fish parts sucked into a drain"); stabbed in the Adam's apple; shot in the face ("the exit hole splattered pink all over the ferns"); tied to the hood of a car; devoured by alligators. A woman commits suicide by cutting off her genitals and slashing her own windpipe. How can a book packed with macabre acts of violence possibly be dull? Live by Night offers an excellent opportunity to contemplate this question.

Read more

4:48am

Tue October 2, 2012
The Picture Show

Like 007 Himself, James Bond Movie Posters Live To See Another Day

James Bond: 50 Years Of Movie Posters

There is something deliciously enticing about the advance poster for the 1962 movie Dr. No. It featured a bright yellow Technicolor background, lipstick, a gun and the numeral 007 — all teasing the audience about what was to come. "The First James Bond Film!" (Their exclamation point, not mine.) It was part of a campaign that launched the celluloid franchise that today, half a century later, is still one of the biggest draws of the big screen.

Read more

3:21am

Tue October 2, 2012
Books

Boozy Birth Of The American Mafia In Lehane's Latest

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 1:08 pm

iStockphoto.com

Here's how the new novel from crime writer Dennis Lehane begins: "Some years later, on a tugboat in the Gulf of Mexico, Joe Coughlin's feet were placed in a tub of cement."

Pretty hard to stop reading after an opening line like that — at least you'd think. "It was funny, a guy came up to me the other night, and he said, 'I really loved this book once it got going,' " Lehane tells NPR's Steve Inskeep. "I thought, 'Jesus Christ, read the first sentence! How much more "getting going" is it going to get?' "

Read more

3:21am

Tue October 2, 2012
Movie Interviews

Shaking, Stirring Up The James Bond Franchise

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 1:08 pm

Siblings Barbara Broccoli and Michael G. Wilson have been working on James Bond films since the 1970s. They are the producers of the latest installment, Skyfall.
Stuart Wilson Getty Images

This Friday marks 50 years since the release of the first James Bond film, Dr. No. Ian Fleming's Cold War-era MI6 agent has endured through 22 movies, evolving all the while to stay relevant to new audiences. The next installment is Skyfall, due out Nov. 9.

Barbara Broccoli and Michael Wilson are the franchise's current producers and children of the original producer, Albert "Cubby" Broccoli. NPR's David Greene spoke to them about the family business.

Read more

5:11pm

Mon October 1, 2012
Author Interviews

Housekeeping Tips From One Mercurial 'Mommy'

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 6:20 pm

Farrar, Straus and Giroux

The cursing mommy likes her scotch. She also likes a martini — or four — and a full bottle of Kahlua consumed in the afternoon while soaking in a steaming bathtub and ignoring the knocks of her children locked outside. Along with her dubious parenting skills, the cursing mommy has no shame, and she swears an extremely blue streak.

Read more

4:59pm

Mon October 1, 2012
Art & Design

In 'Music Of Trees,' A Symphony In The Key Of Cedar

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 7:38 pm

Composer Abby Aresty recorded the sounds of a Seattle arboretum and mixed them into seven compositions that are now playing throughout the park.
Courtesy of Abby Aresty

There's a symphony of sound playing this month at the Washington Park Arboretum in Seattle. Composer and sound artist Abby Aresty recorded the natural sounds of the park over the course of a year — including a gurgling pond, a bicycle rolling by on a gravel path, bird song — and then mixed the recordings into seven compositions.

The pieces are played through speakers that have been installed at seven sites around the arboretum. The project is called Paths II: The Music Of Trees.

Read more

Pages