Arts

3:06pm

Mon December 3, 2012
The Salt

Sandwich Monday: The CBO

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 10:05 am

Cheddar*, Bacon, Onion.
NPR

Joining the McDLT in the great history of abbreviated McDonald's sandwiches is the CBO burger. "CBO" stands for Cheddar, Bacon, Onion, but as you can see below, they had to put an asterisk after "cheddar."

Peter: The asterisk should lead you to the bottom of the box where there's a little message saying TOO LATE, YOU'RE DEAD.

Mike: The asterisk really changes the menu. Not sure I want a Filet-O-F*** or a Sham**ck Shake.

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12:15pm

Mon December 3, 2012
The Two-Way

'Three Cups Of Tea' Co-Author Took Own Life, Medical Examiner Says

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 3:51 pm

Viking Press

David Oliver Relin, a journalist who had reported from around the world before gaining fame — and getting mired in controversy — as co-author of the best-selling Three Cups of Tea, took his own life when he died on Nov. 15 in Oregon, The New York Times reports.

It got that word from Relin's family.

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7:54am

Mon December 3, 2012
You Must Read This

A Gruesome "Sabbath": Roth's Vile, Brilliant Masterpiece

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 10:03 am

Matthew Specktor is the author of the forthcoming novel American Dream Machine.

Some books love to be loved. They make their moves on us softly, they butter us up. Who doesn't love Atticus Finch or Franny Glass? These people resemble our better selves, and it's easy, from there, to love the books that contain them. So why is it that whenever someone asks me what they should be reading, I steer them instead toward one of the most loathsome characters in contemporary fiction, Philip Roth's Mickey Sabbath?

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7:03am

Mon December 3, 2012
Best Books Of 2012

Finder's Keepers: 2012's Stories To Hang On To

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 12:05 pm

Nishant Choksi

Part of a book critic's challenge is to sift through piles of new publications, panning for literary gold. In a way that makes us what one of my favorite children's book heroines, Astrid Lindgren's Pippi Longstocking, called a "turnupstuffer" — "Somebody who finds the stuff that turns up if only you look." Or like Dickens' optimistic Mr. Micawber, who was always sure something good would turn up.

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3:23am

Mon December 3, 2012
Monkey See

Neil deGrasse Tyson Helps His New 'Bud' Superman Get A Glimpse Of Home

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 8:29 am

From Action Comics 14, Neil deGrasse Tyson greets Superman to help him with a problem.
DC Comics

On Monday's Morning Edition, Hayden Planetarium director and pop-culture go-to science guy Neil deGrasse Tyson tells NPR's David Greene the story of how he came to lend a hand to Superman.

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3:12pm

Sun December 2, 2012
Author Interviews

'Bartholomew Biddle': A Writer's 15-Year Adventure

Originally published on Sun December 2, 2012 5:06 pm

Candlewick

Gary Ross has penned and directed some big Hollywood hits like Big, Pleasantville and The Hunger Games. But for the past 15 years, his obsession has been something much more personal: a Dr. Seuss-ian children's book called Bartholomew Biddle and the Very Big Wind.

It started when Ross got a call in 1996 from fellow screenwriter David Koepp. Koepp was up against a tight budget and approaching deadline with his debut directorial effort, The Trigger Effect. Its heroine had to read an as-yet-unwritten bedtime story to her child.

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12:08pm

Sun December 2, 2012
The Picture Show

Remembering A Rock Star: Photographer Ken Regan

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 4:21 pm

Photographer Ken Regan with the Rolling Stones, 1977
Courtesy of Ken Regan/Camera 5

If you've been around longer than me, perhaps you were already familiar with Ken Regan's photography.

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5:58am

Sun December 2, 2012
Music Interviews

Dozens Of Covers Later, 'Hallelujah' Endures

Originally published on Sun December 2, 2012 11:55 am

In 1994, a cover by the late Jeff Buckley helped save "Hallelujah" from musical obscurity.

There are songs, and then there are anthems.

One of those anthems is the subject of music journalist Alan Light's new book, The Holy Or The Broken.

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5:58am

Sun December 2, 2012
Monkey See

The High And The Low In Holiday Movies

Originally published on Sun December 2, 2012 5:59 am

Matchmaker Santa is only one of many cornball films in which Santa (Donovan Scott) helps a woman (Lacey Chabert) find a boyfriend (Adam Mayfield). This is the one where the vanilla extract was key.
Carin Baer Hallmark Channel

My well-documented weird affection for Hallmark movies brings me — along with NPR.org movies editor Trey Graham — to Weekend Edition on Sunday to talk to NPR's Rachel Martin about the high-profile theatrical holiday film as well as the corny basic-cable incarnations that are appropriate to this season.

Trey was in charge of the high parts.

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2:53am

Sun December 2, 2012
Sunday Puzzle

Untangle An 'Act Of God'

Originally published on Sun December 2, 2012 9:42 am

NPR Graphic

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar three-word phrase in the form "____ of ____." The letters in the first and last words of each phrase are rearranged. You give the phrases. For example, "Cat of Dog" becomes "Act of God."

Last week's challenge from listener Henry Hook of Brooklyn, N.Y.: In a few weeks something will happen that hasn't happened since 1987. What is it?

Answer: A year with no repeat digits (1987, 2013)

Winner: Darren Dunham of Santa Clara, Calif.

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