Arts

7:03am

Mon January 7, 2013
PG-13: Risky Reads

A Literary Sex Education In Mumbai

Originally published on Mon January 7, 2013 9:14 am

iStockphoto.com

Manil Suri is the author of the forthcoming novel The City of Devi.

Through the 1960s and '70s and well into the present century, Harold Robbins' name has stood out in India as someone who has perhaps educated the entire repressed subcontinent (or at least its English-speaking population) about sex.

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4:57am

Mon January 7, 2013
Business

Starbucks Joins Designer Trend With Rodarte Collaboration

Originally published on Mon January 7, 2013 9:06 am

Designers and sisters Kate (left) and Laura Mulleavy acknowledge the audience after the Rodarte fall 2012 collection show during Fashion Week last February in New York.
Jason DeCrow AP

Starbucks netted a record $13.3 billion in 2012. But it isn't immune to competition, so the global coffee seller has updated interiors, offered more products and even tapped into couture fashion.

It recently sold several items designed by the small fashion house Rodarte, including a to-go tumbler for $12.95.

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3:40am

Mon January 7, 2013
Author Interviews

Mapping A History Of The World, And Our Place In It

Originally published on Mon January 7, 2013 7:56 am

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Author Simon Garfield loves maps. His home in London is full of them — that's where they're stocked, hanging on walls and piled on shelves. So when Garfield was looking for a new topic to write about, not surprisingly, maps won out.

His new book is called On the Map: A Mind-Expanding Exploration of the Way the World Works.

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4:26pm

Sun January 6, 2013
Author Interviews

Re-Creating The 'Lost Carving' Of An English Genius

Originally published on Sun January 6, 2013 7:06 pm

On one spring day in the early 1970s, writer David Esterly paused to admire a stunning wooden carving inside a London church.

"On the panel behind the altar, I saw these extraordinary cascades of leaves and flowers and fruits, carved to a fineness and fluent realism, which seemed to me breathtaking," Esterly recalled in an interview with Jacki Lyden, host of weekends on All Things Considered.

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7:03am

Sun January 6, 2013
You Must Read This

Adjust Your Vision: Tolstoy's Last And Darkest Novel

cover detail

George Saunders' latest book is called Tenth of December: Stories.

It's become commonplace to say that good fiction "wakes us up." The speaker usually means that he — a righteous, likable person, living in the correct way — becomes, post-reading, temporarily even more righteous and likable.

Resurrection, Tolstoy's last and darkest novel, works differently.

It's a shocking and impolite book, seemingly incapable of that last-minute epiphanic updraft or lyric reversal that lets us walk away from even the darkest novel fundamentally intact.

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7:03am

Sun January 6, 2013
Essays

At Home In Fantasy's Nerd-Built Worlds

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Once, in an age long past, "epic" was a dirty word.

Way back when I was a young nerd growing up in the Midwest in the 1980s — long before I became a professional writer — histories of magic rings and chronicles of ancient evils were not exactly mainstream fare. Indeed, to publicize one's knowledge of Elvish sword-names and Orcish myth was to contract a kind of voluntary leprosy.

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7:00am

Sun January 6, 2013
Strange News

It Would Take Way More Seagulls To Lift James' Peach

Originally published on Sun January 6, 2013 10:02 am

Host Rachel Martin delves into the physics behind Roald Dahl's childrens' classic, James and the Giant Peach. Physics students at the University of Leicester calculated that it would take 2,425,907 seagulls to lift James' Giant Peach, making Roald Dahl's number (501), entirely insufficient.

7:00am

Sun January 6, 2013
Movies

Film Flubs In 2012: A List Of Inconsistencies

Originally published on Sun January 6, 2013 10:02 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

2012 was a great year for U.S. movie ticket sales - nearly $11 billion. Some of the highest grossing films include "The Avengers."

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "THE AVENGERS")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: (as character) What have I to fear?

ROBERT DOWNEY JR.: (as Tony Sparks) The Avengers - that's what we call ourselves. Earth's mightiest heroes type thing.

MARTIN: "The Dark Knight Rises."

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "THE DARK KNIGHT RISES")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: (as character) I need to see Bruce Wayne.

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6:15am

Sun January 6, 2013
Sunday Puzzle

Scrambling To Ring In The New Year

Originally published on Sat January 12, 2013 5:19 pm

NPR Graphic

On-air challenge: This week's puzzle celebrates ringing in the new year. Take the letters Y-E-A-R. Add one letter and scramble to make a new word that answers the clue. For example, by adding the letter B to Y-E-A-R, with the clue "maker of aspirin," the answer would be "Bayer."

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6:15am

Sun January 6, 2013
Books

'The Great Agnostic': Giving Up Politics To Preach Against Religion

Originally published on Sun January 6, 2013 10:02 am

Attention American history buffs, here's a name you might not have heard before: Robert Ingersoll. According to author Susan Jacoby, he was "one of the most famous people in America in the last quarter of the 19th century."

"He went around the country," Jacoby tells NPR's Rachel Martin. "He spoke to more people than presidents. He was also an active mover and shaker behind the scenes of the Republican Party."

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