Arts

1:23pm

Mon January 7, 2013
Television

Julian Fellowes On The Rules Of 'Downton'

Jim Carter as Mr. Carson in Downton Abbey. The third season premiered on PBS Sunday.
WGBH/PBS

Julian Fellowes may be the Baron Fellowes of West Stafford, but the English screenwriter, director and novelist says his background "was much more ordinary than the newspapers have made it." What he means is that he did not grow up with servants waiting on him hand and foot, as people have seen done for the Crawley family on Downton Abbey, the hit television series Fellowes created. The third season premiered Sunday.

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11:24am

Mon January 7, 2013
Arts & Life

Russell Peters, 'Notorious' And Unapologetic

The Indian-Canadian comedian is known for mimicking accents and poking fun at race, culture and class. He's performed for audiences worldwide. All that after being bullied as the brown kid in a mostly white neighborhood. Peters talks to guest host Celeste Headlee about his personal life and his new world tour called 'Notorious.'

11:24am

Mon January 7, 2013
Theater

You're Invited: Verdi's 200th Birthday Celebration

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 2:17 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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11:08am

Mon January 7, 2013
Monkey See

Why 'Amour' Is Sad, But Not Depressing

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 3:29 pm

Emmanuelle Riva in Michael Haneke's Amour.
Sony Pictures Classics

The first voices I heard about Michael Haneke's Amour were essentially in complete agreement: beautiful, brilliant, almost unbearably depressing. Having seen it, I'm not sure I agree with that last part.

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7:03am

Mon January 7, 2013
Poetry

Guns, God And A Reggae Beat: A 2013 Poetry Preview

Originally published on Mon January 7, 2013 11:11 am

Now that we're done with all that fiscal cliff wrangling (sort of), it's time to move on to priority No. 2: the next year in poetry. Just kidding. But, with the whole year stretching out before us, it is a good time to get excited about what literature has in store.

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7:03am

Mon January 7, 2013
PG-13: Risky Reads

A Literary Sex Education In Mumbai

Originally published on Mon January 7, 2013 9:14 am

iStockphoto.com

Manil Suri is the author of the forthcoming novel The City of Devi.

Through the 1960s and '70s and well into the present century, Harold Robbins' name has stood out in India as someone who has perhaps educated the entire repressed subcontinent (or at least its English-speaking population) about sex.

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4:57am

Mon January 7, 2013
Business

Starbucks Joins Designer Trend With Rodarte Collaboration

Originally published on Mon January 7, 2013 9:06 am

Designers and sisters Kate (left) and Laura Mulleavy acknowledge the audience after the Rodarte fall 2012 collection show during Fashion Week last February in New York.
Jason DeCrow AP

Starbucks netted a record $13.3 billion in 2012. But it isn't immune to competition, so the global coffee seller has updated interiors, offered more products and even tapped into couture fashion.

It recently sold several items designed by the small fashion house Rodarte, including a to-go tumbler for $12.95.

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3:40am

Mon January 7, 2013
Author Interviews

Mapping A History Of The World, And Our Place In It

Originally published on Mon January 7, 2013 7:56 am

iStockphoto.com

Author Simon Garfield loves maps. His home in London is full of them — that's where they're stocked, hanging on walls and piled on shelves. So when Garfield was looking for a new topic to write about, not surprisingly, maps won out.

His new book is called On the Map: A Mind-Expanding Exploration of the Way the World Works.

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4:26pm

Sun January 6, 2013
Author Interviews

Re-Creating The 'Lost Carving' Of An English Genius

Originally published on Sun January 6, 2013 7:06 pm

On one spring day in the early 1970s, writer David Esterly paused to admire a stunning wooden carving inside a London church.

"On the panel behind the altar, I saw these extraordinary cascades of leaves and flowers and fruits, carved to a fineness and fluent realism, which seemed to me breathtaking," Esterly recalled in an interview with Jacki Lyden, host of weekends on All Things Considered.

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7:03am

Sun January 6, 2013
You Must Read This

Adjust Your Vision: Tolstoy's Last And Darkest Novel

cover detail

George Saunders' latest book is called Tenth of December: Stories.

It's become commonplace to say that good fiction "wakes us up." The speaker usually means that he — a righteous, likable person, living in the correct way — becomes, post-reading, temporarily even more righteous and likable.

Resurrection, Tolstoy's last and darkest novel, works differently.

It's a shocking and impolite book, seemingly incapable of that last-minute epiphanic updraft or lyric reversal that lets us walk away from even the darkest novel fundamentally intact.

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