Arts

7:03am

Wed January 9, 2013
Book Reviews

Harrison's New Novellas Present Men In Full

Courtesy of Grove/Atlantic

Two years have gone by since I first suggested to President Obama that he create a new Cabinet post, and appoint distinguished fiction writer Jim Harrison as secretary for quality of life. The president still has not responded to my suggestion, and meanwhile Harrison has gone on to publish his latest book of novellas, which deepens and broadens his already openhearted and smart-minded sense of the way we live now, and what we might do to improve it.

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6:26am

Wed January 9, 2013
Poetry

Richard Blanco Will Be First Latino Inaugural Poet

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 3:44 pm

Poet Richard Blanco is the author of City of a Hundred Fires, Directions to the Beach of the Dead and Looking for the Gulf Motel.
Nico Tucci Courtesy Richard Blanco

In 1961, Robert Frost became the first poet to read at a U.S. inauguration when he recited "The Gift Outright" at President John F. Kennedy's swearing in. Since then, only three other poets have taken part in subsequent inaugural ceremonies: Maya Angelou, Miller Williams and Elizabeth Alexander. Now, there's a fifth.

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3:16am

Wed January 9, 2013
Kitchen Window

Post-Holiday Detox Dining Can Be A Tasty Surprise

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 3:24 pm

Eve Turow for NPR

OK, I'll admit it: I've thought about doing a liquid cleanse. Detoxing, renewing myself, clearing out my system all sounds appealing, especially post-holiday binging. As baked brie, gingerbread cookies and rich stews settle onto my hips, a detox becomes ever more alluring. I've never taken the leap, though, for one simple reason: I like eating solids.

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4:54pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Remembrances

Architecture Critic Huxtable Remembered For Clever, Biting Commentary

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 6:37 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable had a pillow stitched with the words: Ada Louise Huxtable already doesn't like it. That was the zingy caption of a New Yorker cartoon from 1968. The cartoon showed a rough construction site with only a single column erected. A construction worker in a hardhat is holding a newspaper reading Huxtable's scathing critique to the architect. Ada Louise Huxtable, who pioneered architecture criticism, died yesterday in Manhattan. She was 91.

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1:50pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Author Interviews

'The Fall Of The House Of Dixie' Built A New U.S.

Random House

This month marks the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, which President Lincoln issued on Jan. 1, 1863, in the midst of the Civil War. The document declares that all those held as slaves within any state, or part of a state, in rebellion "shall be then, thenceforward and forever free."

Historian Bruce Levine explores the destruction of the old South and the reunified country that emerged from the Civil War in his new book, The Fall of the House of Dixie. He says one result of the document was a flood of black men from the South into the Union Army.

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7:03am

Tue January 8, 2013
Book Reviews

From George Saunders, A Dark 'December'

Flickr user Anja Jonsson

Since the publication of George Saunders' 1996 debut story collection, Civilwarland in Bad Decline, journalists and scholars have been trying to figure out how to describe his writing. Nobody has come very close. The short story writer and novelist has been repeatedly called "original," which is true as far as it goes — but it doesn't go nearly far enough. Saunders blends elements of science fiction, horror and humor writing into his trademark brand of literary fiction.

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7:03am

Tue January 8, 2013
New In Paperback

Jan. 7-13: Haiti, Watergate, The Universe And 'Religion For Atheists'

Fiction and nonfiction releases from Charlotte Rogan, Thomas Mallon, Laurent Dubois, Lawrence Krauss and Alain de Botton.

Copyright 2013 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:47am

Tue January 8, 2013
Theater

A Vet's Haunted Homecoming In 'Water By The Spoonful'

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 6:06 am

Liza Colon-Zayas plays a troubled character named Odessa Ortiz, who finds her better self online. She's pictured above with Bill Heck, as Fountainhead.
Richard Termine

The cliche about writers is they should write what they know, and that old saw has certainly worked for Quiara Alegria Hudes. The 35-year-old playwright has mined her Puerto Rican family's stories into a series of plays, a musical and even a children's book. Now, her Pulitzer Prize-winning drama, Water by the Spoonful, is being brought to life in the first New York production of the play, opening off-Broadway on Tuesday evening.

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7:08pm

Mon January 7, 2013
Ask Me Another

Name That Candy Bar

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 10:10 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Let's bring up our first two contestants, and let's welcome Mike Cisneros and Sarah Sheppard.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Sarah, I understand you're a big pop culture fan, and just moved to New York from North Carolina. Welcome, nice to have you.

SARAH SHEPPARD: Thank you.

EISENBERG: And Mike, you're a trivia buff too, since, what, grade five? Is that right?

MIKE CISNEROS: Yeah, roughly.

EISENBERG: You discovered Games magazine and it was all over, right?

CISNEROS: Absolutely.

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7:08pm

Mon January 7, 2013
Ask Me Another

It's All Squeak To Me

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 10:10 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Let's welcome our next two contestants, in front of me right now, Tina Kendall and Stephen Kendall. Wait a second.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: So you both have the same last name, huh?

TINA KENDALL: Yes.

STEPHEN KENDALL: Yeah, coincidence.

EISENBERG: How do you know each other?

KENDALL: Oh, I found him in a hospital many years ago.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: This is a mother/son competition.

KENDALL: Yeah.

KENDALL: Yes.

EISENBERG: Are you guys competitive with each other?

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