Arts

5:22pm

Thu September 13, 2012
Monkey See

When TV Shows Go To College, They Fail To Make The Grade

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 12:57 pm

Many lead characters in Fox's Glee will head to college this season. But will higher education lead to lower ratings?
Fox

I was packing up my recording equipment after interviewing TV executive Susanne Daniels — for a different story — when she said, casually, "Have you ever noticed how there's never been a really great TV show about college?"

I looked at her. Then I started unpacking my equipment again. She had just offered me a story.

Read more

5:20pm

Thu September 13, 2012
The Salt

A Little Patience, A Lot Of Salt Are Keys To A Lost Pickle Recipe

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:45 pm

There's more than one way to make a pickle.
iStockphoto.com

Here's a new mantra you might consider adding to your list of daily kitchen chants: "It takes patience to perpetuate pickles."

Read more

2:58pm

Thu September 13, 2012
Television

New Shows Hit Average In Fall TV Lineup

Mamie Gummer stars as the title character in Emily Owens, M.D., the best new show on broadcast television this fall.
Jack Rowand The CW

Last year, the broadcast networks didn't do well at all when it came to new series development. We got ABC's clever Once Upon a Time, which was about it for the fall crop, until midseason perked things up with NBC's Smash. Otherwise, a year ago, all the exciting new fall series were on cable, thanks to Showtime's brilliant Homeland and FX's audacious American Horror Story.

Read more

2:04pm

Thu September 13, 2012
Television

'Totally Biased' Comic On Race, Politics And Audience

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 5:03 pm

W. Kamau Bell's new FX weekly series Totally Biased mixes standup, sketches and interviews.
Matthias Clamer

10:03am

Thu September 13, 2012
Book Reviews

Does The Success Of Women Mean 'The End Of Men'?

Double X blog. She is also a senior editor at The Atlantic." href="/post/does-success-women-mean-end-men" class="noexit lightbox">
Hanna Rosin is the co-founder of Slate's Double X blog. She is also a senior editor at The Atlantic.
Nina Subin Riverhead Books

Hanna Rosin's pop sociology work The End of Men, based on her cover story in The Atlantic magazine, is a frustrating blend of genuine insight and breezy, unconvincing anecdotalism. She begins with a much-discussed statistic: three-quarters of the 7.5 million jobs lost in our current recession were once held by men.

Read more

7:03am

Thu September 13, 2012
Books

New In Paperback Sept. 10-16

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 11:34 am

Fiction and nonfiction releases from Mat Johnson, Hector Tobar, Ayad Akhtar, Mike Birbiglia and Steven Brill.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

7:03am

Thu September 13, 2012
Book Reviews

'Lose Her' Finds Power In Resonant Voices

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 11:49 am

Great fiction is built around characters that follow the fruitless and wrongheaded paths they're offered, which is how readers savor safe passage into someone else's impetuosity. Yunior, who first appeared in Junot Diaz's debut collection, Drown, is the narrator in several of the stories in the Pulitzer Prize–winning author's third book, This Is How You Lose Her. Yunior is now middle-aged, middle-class, a self-described sucio struggling to mature into adulthood and not succeeding particularly well.

Read more

3:44pm

Wed September 12, 2012
The Two-Way

Syrian Documentary Producer Orwa Nyrabia Is Freed; Was Arrested Two Weeks Ago

A Syrian documentary film producer whose disappearance two weeks ago prompted concerns for his safety and a letter of support from the Toronto International Film Festival is now free, according to reports.

Read more

2:02pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Book Reviews

'The Scientists': A Father's Lie And A Family's Legacy

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 3:20 pm

Every New York story ever written or filmed falls into one of two categories. The first — like Betty Smith's A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, or the musical On the Town — regards New York as the representative American city, a jam-packed distillation of the country's dreams and nightmares. The second group views New York as a foreign place — a city off the coast of the U.S. mainland that somehow drifted away from Paris or Mars. Think every Manhattan movie ever made by Woody Allen.

Read more

2:00pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Politics

Michael Lewis Studies 'Obama's Way'

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 4:05 pm

Contributing editor Michael Lewis played basketball with President Obama while working on a piece for Vanity Fair.
Pete Souza The White House

Author Michael Lewis made a radical request to the White House that he says he was almost certain would be denied: He wanted to write a piece about President Obama that would put the reader in the president's shoes.

To do this, the Vanity Fair contributing editor would need inside access. So what did he propose?

Read more

Pages