Arts

7:03am

Thu January 10, 2013
Book Reviews

'Umbrella' Is A Twisted Modernist Masterpiece

Will Self's latest novel, the Booker-shortlisted Umbrella, is a strange and sprawling modernist experiment that takes the human mind as its subject and, like the human mind, is infinitely capacious, wretchedly petty and ultimately magnificent, even in its defects.

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3:28am

Thu January 10, 2013
Digital Life

In Video-Streaming Rat Race, Fast Is Never Fast Enough

Originally published on Fri January 11, 2013 1:55 pm

Tommy Ingberg iStockphoto.com

On average, YouTube streams 4 billion hours of video per month. That's a lot of video, but it's only a fraction of the larger online-streaming ecosystem. For video-streaming services, making sure clips always load properly is extremely challenging, and a new study reveals that it's important to video providers, too.

Maybe this has happened to you: You're showing a friend some hilarious video that you found online. And right before you get to the punch line, a little loading dial pops up in the middle of the screen.

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4:31pm

Wed January 9, 2013
Book Reviews

'A Life In Friendships' Is A Life Well Lived

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 6:31 pm

She Matters cover detail

You know how sometimes in life you make a friend, and at first you want to talk to her all the time, feverishly telling her details that, by their very personal nature, will bind you to this other person forever, or so you hope? But inevitably, of course, friendships shift and change and become something different from what they initially seemed.

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2:37pm

Wed January 9, 2013
Monkey See

In 'Django' And 'Lincoln,' Two Very Different Takes On America's Racial Past

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 12:50 pm

Christoph Waltz and Jamie Foxx in Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained.
The Weinstein Company

There hasn't been a major Hollywood movie in recent memory with more confounding racial politics than Django Unchained. And there probably isn't a film more representative of Hollywood's take on race than Lincoln.

(This post is full of potential spoilers. Consider yourself warned.)

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12:25pm

Wed January 9, 2013
Theater

Bobby Cannavale, At Home On Broadway

Bobby Cannavale (right) stars in Glengarry Glen Ross on Broadway. Cannavale has also starred in television shows such as HBO's Boardwalk Empire and in films such as The Station Agent.
Scott Landis JRA Broadway

Bobby Cannavale may have acted in film and on television, but at heart, he's a theater guy. Always has been, always will be.

Last season he starred as Gyp Rosetti on the HBO series Boardwalk Empire. He's currently on Broadway opposite Al Pacino in David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross -- but the stage has been his calling since he was a kid growing up in Union City, N.J.

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7:03am

Wed January 9, 2013
Book Reviews

Harrison's New Novellas Present Men In Full

Courtesy of Grove/Atlantic

Two years have gone by since I first suggested to President Obama that he create a new Cabinet post, and appoint distinguished fiction writer Jim Harrison as secretary for quality of life. The president still has not responded to my suggestion, and meanwhile Harrison has gone on to publish his latest book of novellas, which deepens and broadens his already openhearted and smart-minded sense of the way we live now, and what we might do to improve it.

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6:26am

Wed January 9, 2013
Poetry

Richard Blanco Will Be First Latino Inaugural Poet

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 3:44 pm

Poet Richard Blanco is the author of City of a Hundred Fires, Directions to the Beach of the Dead and Looking for the Gulf Motel.
Nico Tucci Courtesy Richard Blanco

In 1961, Robert Frost became the first poet to read at a U.S. inauguration when he recited "The Gift Outright" at President John F. Kennedy's swearing in. Since then, only three other poets have taken part in subsequent inaugural ceremonies: Maya Angelou, Miller Williams and Elizabeth Alexander. Now, there's a fifth.

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3:16am

Wed January 9, 2013
Kitchen Window

Post-Holiday Detox Dining Can Be A Tasty Surprise

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 3:24 pm

Eve Turow for NPR

OK, I'll admit it: I've thought about doing a liquid cleanse. Detoxing, renewing myself, clearing out my system all sounds appealing, especially post-holiday binging. As baked brie, gingerbread cookies and rich stews settle onto my hips, a detox becomes ever more alluring. I've never taken the leap, though, for one simple reason: I like eating solids.

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4:54pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Remembrances

Architecture Critic Huxtable Remembered For Clever, Biting Commentary

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 6:37 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable had a pillow stitched with the words: Ada Louise Huxtable already doesn't like it. That was the zingy caption of a New Yorker cartoon from 1968. The cartoon showed a rough construction site with only a single column erected. A construction worker in a hardhat is holding a newspaper reading Huxtable's scathing critique to the architect. Ada Louise Huxtable, who pioneered architecture criticism, died yesterday in Manhattan. She was 91.

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1:50pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Author Interviews

'The Fall Of The House Of Dixie' Built A New U.S.

Random House

This month marks the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, which President Lincoln issued on Jan. 1, 1863, in the midst of the Civil War. The document declares that all those held as slaves within any state, or part of a state, in rebellion "shall be then, thenceforward and forever free."

Historian Bruce Levine explores the destruction of the old South and the reunified country that emerged from the Civil War in his new book, The Fall of the House of Dixie. He says one result of the document was a flood of black men from the South into the Union Army.

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