Arts

9:16am

Sat September 15, 2012
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!

'Thrones' Author George R.R. Martin Plays Not My Job

Charles Sykes AP

Twenty years ago, writer George R.R. Martin left the television industry because TV executives kept telling him his ideas were too expensive to shoot. So he went home and wrote A Game of Thrones. It was the first novel in an epic fantasy series that's now sold millions of copies and has been made into a hit TV series by HBO ... where executives keep telling him his ideas are too expensive to shoot.

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6:37am

Sat September 15, 2012
Books

'The Black Count,' A Hero On The Field, And The Page

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 11:35 am

General Thomas-Alexandre Dumas.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Gen. Thomas-Alexandre Dumas was one of the heroes of the French Revolution — but you won't find a statue of him in Paris today.

He led armies of thousands in triumph through treacherous territory, from the snows of the Alps to the sands of Egypt, and his true life stories inspired his son, Alexandre Dumas, to write The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers.

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6:06am

Sat September 15, 2012
Movie Interviews

Amy Adams: A Steely Wife Stands Behind 'The Master'

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 12:57 pm

In Paul Thomas Anderson's The Master, Amy Adams plays Peggy Dodd, the spouse of a charismatic spiritual leader, played by Philip Seymour Hoffman. Adams says her character is smart and educated but feels "more powerful behind a man than in front of a man."
The Weinstein Co.

Amy Adams has played a Disney princess, a puckish Amelia Earhart, an innocent young nun and a blogging Brooklynite who wants to follow the recipe for being Julia Child.

But she takes a more steely turn in her latest role in The Master, which has just opened in New York and Los Angeles. The film, written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, also stars Joaquin Phoenix and Philip Seymour Hoffman.

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6:06am

Sat September 15, 2012
Books News & Features

A Father's Decades-Old Bedtime Story Is Back In Print

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 2:13 pm

One night in 1947, an intensely curious 5-year-old boy named Michael McCleery asked his father for a story. So his father, William McCleery, produced a tale that revolved around a wolf named Waldo, a hen named Rainbow, and another little boy, the son of a farmer, named Jimmy Tractorwheel. Over weeks and weeks, William serialized the story, telling it in installments to Michael and his best friend during bedtimes and Sunday afternoon outings.

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6:05am

Sat September 15, 2012
The Salt

Rosh Hashana's Sacred Bread Offers Meaning In Many Shapes And Sizes

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:43 pm

The author's braided round challah.
Deena Prichep NPR

Challah is a rich, eggy bread baked every week for the Jewish sabbath, or shabbat. But for Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year that starts tomorrow at sundown, it gets a few tweaks. There's a little extra honey or sugar, for a sweet new year. And instead of the usual long braid, it's round.

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6:05am

Sat September 15, 2012
Author Interviews

'Skagboys': Heroin Highs In 'Trainspotting' Prequel

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 2:43 pm

The boys are back — Mark Renton, Sick Boy, Spud, Begbie and other memorable characters from Irvine Welsh's 1994 novel, Trainspotting, come back to life in Welsh's new book, Skagboys.

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6:45pm

Fri September 14, 2012
Monkey See

Pop Culture Happy Hour: O Canada!

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

We taped this week's show with half of us in D.C. and half of us — me and Trey, plus NPR's own Bob Mondello — in a studio in Toronto. Why? Because of the Toronto International Film Festival, which provides the front half of the show. Trey, Bob and I talk about a bunch of the films we saw, many of which you can see covered on the blog's TIFF '12 section.

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6:27pm

Fri September 14, 2012
Books

This Week's 5 Must-Read Stories From NPR Books

iStockphoto.com

Once A Cheater...

One of the most interesting books I've read so far this year has been This Is How You Lose Her, by Junot Diaz. And there's a reason it's such a well constructed read — as NPR's Steve Inskeep pointed out — it took Diaz 16 years to write.

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4:05pm

Fri September 14, 2012
Monkey See

Jackie Chan: Portrait Of The Action Star At 58

Actor Jackie Chan appears at the Toronto International Film Festival.
Jemal Countess Getty Images

Onstage at the Toronto International Film Festival, Jackie Chan describes his first visit to the United States. "I speak no English at that time — I do not even know how to order breakfast. Everyone know ... you know the story?"

"No," says the audience, almost in unison.

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1:22pm

Fri September 14, 2012
Movie Reviews

'The Master': Filling A Void By Finding A Family

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 1:45 pm

Joaquin Phoenix stars as Navy veteran Freddie Quell in The Master.
Phil Bray The Weinstein Company

Paul Thomas Anderson's The Master is both feverish and glacial. The vibe is chilly, but the central character is an unholy mess — and his rage saturates every frame. He's a World War II South Pacific vet named Freddie Quell, played by Joaquin Phoenix to the hilt — the hilt above the hilt. We meet him at war's end on a tropical beach where he and other soldiers seek sexual relief atop the figure of a woman made out of sand.

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