Arts

4:43pm

Sun September 16, 2012
Arts & Life

A Reminder, Three-Minute Fiction Round 9 Is Open

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 9:50 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Just a reminder now that Round 9 of our Three-Minute Fiction Contest is open. It's where we ask you to write an original short story that can be read in about three minutes, so no more than 600 words. In each round, we have a judge with a new challenge. And this time, it's novelist Brad Meltzer, and he's come up with this.

BRAD MELTZER: Your story must revolve around a U.S. president who can be fictional or real.

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4:43pm

Sun September 16, 2012
The Salt

Nordic Cuisine: Moving Beyond The Meatballs And Pickled Fish

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:42 pm

The Nordic Food Lab experiments with garum, a form of fish sauce familiar to the ancient Romans.
courtesy Nordic Food Lab

For many people, the phrase "Scandinavian food" probably doesn't bring much to mind beyond the Ikea food court. For those who do have a connection with these Northern European countries, the mental image is probably smothered in gravy with a side of potatoes. But if you're coming to Copenhagen's noma restaurant expecting the same old meatballs and pickled fish, think again.

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6:24am

Sun September 16, 2012
Books

In 'Victory Lab,' A Concoction Crafted To Move Voters

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 2:24 pm

iStockphoto.com

Campaigns today are collecting information that goes way beyond demographics. Data points as disparate as the catalogs you peruse or the car you drive all make up a picture that campaigns use to find common ground with their candidates — and get you to the voting booth.

Journalist Sasha Issenberg describes this data-driven world in his new book, The Victory Lab. There were two "major innovations" that spurred the modern approach to voter outreach, he tells Weekend Edition guest host Linda Wertheimer.

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6:24am

Sun September 16, 2012
Author Interviews

Doomed Love And Psychic Powers In 'Raven Boys'

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 9:20 am

Courtesy of Scholastic

Maggie Stiefvater is a young-adult author with a passionate fan base — she describes her subject matter as everything from "homicidal faeries" to "werewolf nookie."

She wrote the best-selling Shiver trilogy and the novel The Scorpio Races. Her most-recent book, The Raven Boys, is the first in a series of four that will follow Blue Sargent, daughter of the Henrietta, Va., town psychic, as she becomes involved with the lives of four students at the local private school who call themselves the Raven Boys.

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6:23am

Sun September 16, 2012
The Salt

To Find Truly Wild Rice, Head North To Minnesota

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:43 pm

Joe Hoagland, left, pushes a canoe through a wild rice bed as 14-year-old Chris Salazar learns how to harvest the rice.
Jim Mone AP

Harvest season is upon us, but in the U.S.'s northern lakes, it's not just the last tomatoes and first pumpkins. Through the end of this month, canoes will glide into lakes and rivers for the annual gathering of wild rice, kick started with the popular Wild Rice Festival in Roseville, Minn., on Saturday.

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6:22am

Sun September 16, 2012
Arts & Life

Beverly Hills' Refuge For The Stars Turns 100

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 5:26 pm

The Beverly Hills Hotel as it looked when it opened in 1912. The bleak landscape would eventually be replaced by lush tropical foliage, and after the depression, the white Spanish Mission-style hotel would be painted its now-famous pink.
Courtesy of Robert S. Anderson

The Beverly Hills Hotel, a place fondly known as the Pink Palace, has preserved guests' privacy and indulged their every whim for 100 years, and the entire year will be filled with celebrations of its centennial.

There have been parties for the neighbors, parties for the staff, and a celebration this week as the hotel becomes the first historic landmark in the city of Beverly Hills, Calif.

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12:03am

Sun September 16, 2012
Sunday Puzzle

Missing In Action

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 8:36 am

NPR Graphic

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar phrase in the form of "___ and ___." You'll be given the two missing words, each with a letter removed, and you give the phrases. For example, given "lot and fund," the answer would be "lost and found."

Last week's challenge from listener Erica Avery of Wisconsin: Name a world capital whose letters can be rearranged to spell a popular and much-advertised drug. What's the capital, and what's the drug?

Answer: Tripoli, Lipitor

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4:58pm

Sat September 15, 2012
Pop Culture

Meet 'The Most Interesting Man In The World'

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 3:50 am

Jonathan Goldsmith plays "The Most Interesting Man in the World" in beer company Dos Equis' ad campaign. The audition, he says, "was a cattle call."
Courtesy of Anderson Group Public Relations

4:58pm

Sat September 15, 2012
Author Interviews

Embracing Diversity In A 'Multi-Faith World'

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 5:48 pm

Adam Gryko iStockphoto.com

Time magazine named author and pastor Brian McLaren one of the 25 most influential evangelicals in America.

McLaren has written more than 20 books, and he is a principal figure in the Emerging Church, a Christian movement that rejects the organized and institutional church in favor of a more modern, accepting community.

McLaren's new book is called Why Did Jesus, Moses, the Buddha and Mohammed Cross the Road?: Christian Identity in a Multi-Faith World.

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4:58pm

Sat September 15, 2012
Arts & Life

Three-Minute Fiction Round 9 Continues

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 5:50 pm

A reminder from weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz that Round 9 of our Three-Minute Fiction, our writing contest where our listeners write an original short story, is now open. The story must be based on the following challenge from our judge Brad Meltzer: The story must revolve around a U.S. president, who can be fictional or real and that the short story has to be 600 words or less. Listeners can submit their story online at www.npr.org/threeminutefiction.

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