Arts

4:58pm

Tue January 22, 2013
Movies

Female Directors Make Strong Showing At Sundance

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 5:28 pm

A scene from director Ryan Coogler's Fruitvale, an entry in this year's U.S. Dramatic Competition at the Sundance Film Festival. It dramatizes the 2009 shooting of an unarmed man by a Bay Area transit police officer.
Rachel Morrison Sundance Film Festival

Sundance, the biggest American film festival, has been known for its off-kilter picks. Steven Zeitchik, arts and entertainment writer for the Los Angeles Times, tells NPR's Melissa Block that this year's gathering in Park City, Utah, is no different.

Sex Sells At Sundance

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4:57pm

Tue January 22, 2013
Author Interviews

A Historic Arrival: New York's Grand Central Turns 100

Originally published on Sat February 2, 2013 1:44 pm

Beams of sunlight stream through the windows of Grand Central Terminal, circa 1930.
Hal Morey Getty Images

Where's the Apple store? Where's the bathroom? How do I get out of here?

Those are some of the most commonly asked questions from people visiting New York's Grand Central Terminal, according to information booth officer Audrey Johnson-Gordon. And it's no wonder: The terminal boasts passages, ramps, restaurants, stores, subway connections and more passages. It is, after all, a temple of transit, full of people going somewhere else in a hurry.

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3:56pm

Tue January 22, 2013
Movies

Sundance Subsidy Stirs Conservative Pushback

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 8:48 pm

Robert Redford's annual Sundance Film Festival draws thousands of filmgoers and millions of dollars to snowy Park City, Utah. But a state subsidy contributing to the event is drawing controversy from some conservatives, who say films screened at the festival don't reflect the values of the state.
Jemal Countess Getty Images

A disagreement between supporters of the Sundance Film Festival and a conservative think tank in Utah is raising questions about whether tax dollars should support the arts. The Sutherland Institute says some films screened at Sundance do not reflect Utah values.

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2:36pm

Tue January 22, 2013
The Salt

The Inaugural Food Scene In 12 Bites

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 9:32 am

The restaurant Equinox served a Sunday brunch on Jan. 20 featuring courses inspired by President Obama and Martin Luther King, Jr.'s favorite foods, including this salad of citrus cured arctic char with watermelon radish, mache leaves and lobster vinaigrette.
Daniel M.N. Turner Daniel M.N. Turner / NPR

Uptown and downtown in D.C. this weekend, some 600,000 people or so celebrated President Obama's second inauguration. And they were hungry.

Reflecting the president's message of diversity, city chefs and caterers turned out everything from highbrow brunches featuring smoked salmon and eggs Benedict to a luau, complete with leis and a spit-roasted pig. And there were plenty of hot dogs and chicken and waffles to be found between the balls.

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12:03pm

Tue January 22, 2013
Book Reviews

Missing Out: On The Uses Of Dissatisfaction

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 11:11 am

Farrar, Straus and Giroux

From Malcolm Gladwell to the Freakonomics guys to (discredited) science writer Jonah Lehrer, writers these past few years have flooded bookstores with popular nonfiction titles that purport to tell us how we think. But something has been lost amid the recent vogue for cognitive science and behavioral economics. What about the human part of human behavior — the dreams and desires that set us apart from animals and computers? Are we just assemblages of neurons and chemicals?

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11:54am

Tue January 22, 2013
NPR Story

Comedian Margaret Cho As 'Mother To The World'

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 12:09 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms in your corner. Every week, we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice.

Today, though, we're going to go in a different direction for some observations about parenthood and, unusually for us, she is actually not a parent herself, but her observations about her own mom have been a cornerstone of her career. Here she is.

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3:39am

Tue January 22, 2013
Tina Brown's Must-Reads

Tina Brown's Must-Reads: Hidden Lives

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 10:06 am

Longtime CIA agent and counterintelligence agent Jeanne Vertefeuille, pictured at center, was instrumental in uncovering undercover agents, or moles, within the organization in the 1980s and '90s.
Central Intelligence Agency

Tina Brown, editor-in-chief of Newsweek and The Daily Beast, occasionally joins Morning Edition to talk about what she's been reading for a feature we call "Word of Mouth." This month, she recommends a trio of stories on people who've led hidden and often extraordinary lives — a businesswoman and technological giant who started life in Chinese re-education camps, a billionaire investor and education reformer whose personal experiences are too big for a series of ghostwriters, and a CIA agent whose job was to find a story among piles of forgotten documents.

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5:13pm

Mon January 21, 2013
Arts & Life

Hundreds Of Thousands Gather On National Mall For Inauguration Ceremony

President Obama was ceremonially sworn in for a second term on the steps of the U.S. Capitol on Monday. Melissa Block has highlights of the ceremony and the president's speech.

1:19pm

Mon January 21, 2013
Television

Kevin Bacon, Seeking A TV 'Following'

Originally published on Mon January 21, 2013 1:46 pm

Jeannane Goossen and Kevin Bacon star as FBI special agents tracing a network of serial killers in Fox's new crime drama The Following.
Fox

In the new Fox TV series The Following, Kevin Bacon plays a former FBI agent asked to help apprehend an escaped serial killer he once put behind bars. The show is from Kevin Williamson, who also created the Scream horror-movie franchise.

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1:19pm

Mon January 21, 2013
Author Interviews

'Double V': The Fight For Civil Rights In The U.S. Military

The fight to integrate the U.S. military began with the Revolutionary War, says author Rawn James, Jr.
Bloomsbury Press

In his new book, The Double V: How Wars, Protest and Harry Truman Desegregated America's Military, author Rawn James Jr. argues that if one wants to understand the story of race in the United States, one must understand the history of African-Americans in the country's military. Since the country was founded, he tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies, the military "has continually been forced to confront what it means to segregate individuals according to race."

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