Arts

6:33am

Sat January 26, 2013
Author Interviews

Dave Barry's 'Insane' Miami Mixes Refugees, Gangsters, Escorts And A Burmese Python

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 5:36 pm

Putnam

It wouldn't do to call Insane City "a typical Dave Barry novel." What kind of thing is that to say about a book? The story begins with a bachelor dinner that goes off the rails, then brings in Russian mobsters, the fourth-place finisher in the Miss Hot Amateur Bod contest, a goodhearted escort and her "sales representative," if you please, an albino Burmese python — or is that a Burmese albino python?

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2:23pm

Fri January 25, 2013
The Salt

Haul Out the Haggis, It's Time to Celebrate Burns Night

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 2:32 pm

Haggis is traditionally served with mashed neeps and tatties, or turnips and potatoes.
Bernt Rostad via Flickr

Don't fear the haggis. Just think of it as a big, round sausage. That's what it is anyway.

Haggis is Scotland's national dish and every year on (or near) Jan. 25, it plays the starring role in Burns Suppers held around the world in celebration of the Scottish poet Robert Burns on his birthday.

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2:10pm

Fri January 25, 2013
Movie Reviews

'Parker': An Icy Thriller With A Satisfying Sheen

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 3:26 pm

Career-criminal Parker (Jason Statham) plays by his own set of rules, his icy demeanor masking a man who ultimately knows exactly what he wants.
Jack English Film District

In the strictest terms, Jason Statham isn't the perfect candidate to play Parker, the single-minded career criminal created by the late Donald E. Westlake (working under the pseudonym Richard Stark). Statham, despite having built a career playing rough-and-tumble skull-busters, is just too much of a big pussycat.

As Westlake himself explained, Parker is angry: "Not hot angry — cold angry." Statham, with those inquisitive, cautious eyes and that slow-burning purr of a voice, can act cold, but he can never be cold. Even at his coolest, he's all heat.

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12:05pm

Fri January 25, 2013
Television

Tina Fey: '30 Rock' Star And Creator Moves On

"I was worried about being the mouthpiece for anyone and being politicized personally," Tina Fey says about playing Sarah Palin on Saturday Night Live. "It ended up being a lot of fun, but it did permanently politicize me in a way."
Platon HGB USA

This interview was originally broadcast on April 13, 2011.

Tina Fey grew up in a household with parents she has described as "Goldwater Republicans with pre-Norman Lear racial attitudes."

But, she says, her parents were always supportive of her career, even when she told them she was moving to Chicago to start a career in improv.

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11:48am

Fri January 25, 2013
Remembrances

Former 'Ebony' Editor Was Proud German

Tell Me More remembers Ebony Magazine's former managing editor, Hans Massaquoi. He arrived in America as an outsider, after growing up black in Nazi Germany. Host Michel Martin speaks with his former colleague, Lynn Norment about his career and legacy.

11:48am

Fri January 25, 2013
Barbershop

Did President Obama Misuse MLK's Bible?

The fact that President Obama's second inauguration took place on the same day as the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday felt right to many people, but some critics say the comparison is all wrong. Host Michel Martin and the Barbershop guys weigh in on that and other news.

11:27am

Fri January 25, 2013
The Salt

Still Life With Cheeseburger: Art That Looks Good Enough To Eat

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 1:22 pm

Courtesy of the artist

Back in the day – the 17th century – Vermeer, Rembrandt and the rest of the Dutch Golden Age crew blazed a trail for realism in art. Their work wasn't just technically dazzling; it was also distinctive. Instead of fat baby cherubs and saints, they painted the stuff of every day life. Often, that meant food.

In their hands, grapes popped with juiciness. Lobsters steamed, ready for cracking. Milk practically splashed the viewer as it poured from the jug.

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10:41am

Fri January 25, 2013
Monkey See

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Nerd Culture And The Return Of Regrettable TV

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

We were all struck last week by Noel Murray's A.V. Club piece "The changing face of 'nerds' (and autism) in popular culture," so we spent this week's first segment talking about the separate but related matters it raises of how popular culture deals with nerds and how it deals with autism, not to mention how it deals with the messy and imprecise crossover between the two.

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2:46am

Fri January 25, 2013
Television

Lives Of Praise, Lives In Progress On 'The Sisterhood'

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 9:14 am

The new TLC show The Sisterhood follows the lives of five preachers' wives in Atlanta.
TLC

5:57pm

Thu January 24, 2013
Movie Reviews

'Yossi': Out In Israel, And That's Just Fine

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 9:18 am

After his lover dies in a military exercise, a devastated Yosssi (Ohad Knoller) must move from grief and shame into acceptance of his homosexuality.
Strand Releasing

In the decade since Israeli director Eytan Fox made Yossi & Jagger, the precursor to his sublimely tender new drama Yossi, Israel has undergone two significant changes. A tacit and active homophobia has given way, at least in the open cultural climate of Tel Aviv, to a matter-of-fact acceptance of gay rights. At the same time, Israeli cinema has bloomed, becoming a thriving international presence in just about every genre.

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