Arts

12:05pm

Thu October 25, 2012
Wisdom Watch

Covering The Arts In Tumultuous Times

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And next, the Wisdom Watch conversation. That's the part of the program where we speak with those who've made a difference through their work. Today, we will meet a longtime observer of the Washington scene, former Washington Post reporter Jacqueline Trescott.

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12:04pm

Thu October 25, 2012
History

Jacqueline Kennedy's Style Legacy

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, for two decades she covered theater, museums, gallery openings and movie premiers. Now arts reporter Jacqueline Trescott sits down with us to share some of what she's learned along the way. It's our Wisdom Watch conversation and it's coming up in a few minutes.

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8:54am

Thu October 25, 2012
Monkey See

Morning Shots: The Books You Like Are Probably Bad, And World Series News

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 12:13 pm

iStockphoto.com

I feel very much like the radio lady at the beginning of Singin' In The Rain when I say "rumor has it," but rumor has it that Bradley Cooper and Emma Stone might be starring in something written and directed by Cameron Crowe, and that's actually good enough news if true to make me want to put aside those worries. (Dignity, always dignity.) [Deadline]

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7:05am

Thu October 25, 2012
Business

Pacino To Earn $125,000 Per Week In 'Glengarry'

Actor Al Pacino is returning to Broadway in November to star in David Mamet's classic play, Glengarry Glen Ross. He's playing a different character from the one he playd in the movie version 20 years ago. According to Bloomberg News, he's making $125,000 per week, plus a cut of the show's profits — one of the biggest pay packages ever for a Broadway performer.

7:03am

Thu October 25, 2012
Book Reviews

BBC Arts Editor Allays Your Art Fears In 'Looking'

Courtesy of Dutton Adult

Before his 2010 installation for the Tate Modern's Unilever Series, in which the former London power station-turned-art museum annually commissions a work for its cavernous Turbine Hall, Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei said, "I try not to see art as a secret code." He then filled the hall with 100 million handmade porcelain sunflower seeds.

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4:37am

Thu October 25, 2012
Author Interviews

From Ship To Sherlock: Doyle's 'Arctic' Diary

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 7:05 am

On Thursday, July 29, 1880, Doyle wrote, "Came across a most extraordinary natural snow house, about 12 feet high, shaped like a beehive with a door and a fine room inside in which I sat. Traveled a considerable distance, and would have gone to the Pole, but my matches ran short and I couldn't get a smoke."
Courtesy of University of Chicago Press

On June 15, 1880, Arthur Conan Doyle wrote a vivid sentence in his diary. It read, "The only difference in the weather is that the fog is thicker and the wind more utterly odious and depraved."

Knowing that he was the creator of Sherlock Holmes, you might think Doyle is referring to the thick London fog drifting outside the windows of 221B Baker Street. But this sentence was written years before the first Holmes novel and it describes a considerably harsher environment — the thick fog and depraved wind of the Arctic, where Doyle traveled when he was 20.

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4:26pm

Wed October 24, 2012
Book Reviews

'Middlesteins' Digs Into The Dark Side Of Food

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 5:53 pm

Food appears so often and takes on so much importance in Jami Attenberg's novel The Middlesteins, that while reading it I sometimes felt like I was on a kind of literary cruise ship. But excess isn't presented here wantonly; instead, it's laid out and explored with sympathy, thought and depth. Early on, the parents of the main character think, "Food was made of love, and was what made love, and they could never deny themselves a bite of anything they desired." And so the novel takes off from the evocative starting point known as appetite.

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2:59pm

Wed October 24, 2012
Author Interviews

Tom Wolfe Takes Miami's Pulse In 'Back To Blood'

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 9:37 am

Author and journalist Tom Wolfe's books include The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The Bonfire of the Vanities and I Am Charlotte Simmons, among others.
Jim Cooper AP

Tom Wolfe wrote his new novel, Back to Blood, entirely by hand. But the author of The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and The Bonfire of the Vanities also says that wasn't entirely by choice — he'd rather have used a typewriter.

"Unfortunately, you can't keep typewriters going today — you have to take the ribbons back to be re-inked," Wolfe tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies. "There's a horrible search to try to find missing parts."

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12:03pm

Wed October 24, 2012
Food

Fine Dining Turns To Familiar Favorites

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, it's time to open up the pages of the Washington Post Magazine. That's something we do just about every week for interesting stories about the way we live now. The Post's Fall Dining Guide is out this week and that means food critic Tom Sietsema has been going all over town, eating and drinking up a storm, trying to narrow down his list of favorite restaurants.

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11:58am

Wed October 24, 2012
The Picture Show

What Does "Power" Look Like?

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 1:04 pm

his series Congo Democratic "trace some aspects of the individuals and institutions that have been in power in the Congo," writes photographer Guy Tillim. Here, presidential candidate Jean-Pierre Bemba enters a stadium in central Kinshasa flanked by his bodyguards during an election rally." href="/post/what-does-power-look" class="noexit lightbox">
The photos in his series Congo Democratic "trace some aspects of the individuals and institutions that have been in power in the Congo," writes photographer Guy Tillim. Here, presidential candidate Jean-Pierre Bemba enters a stadium in central Kinshasa flanked by his bodyguards during an election rally.
Guy Tillim Courtesy of Prix Pictet

"Power" is a concept that conjures up different ideas for different people. There's the power of nature or the power of money; or the drive for power at the root of the human psyche — and how it can cause war and discrimination. Or, more literally, how we humans power our existence on the planet.

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