Arts

5:52am

Sun March 17, 2013
Around the Nation

Erin Go Bragh, Shalom: St. Patrick's Day The Jewish Way

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 11:33 pm

St. Patrick's Day in New York now means parades and green beer. But 50 years ago, it also meant green matzo balls at the annual banquet of the Loyal League of Yiddish Sons of Erin. The league was a fraternal organization of Irish-born Jews.

The major migration of Jews to Ireland started in the 1880s and '90s, says Hasia Diner, who teaches history and Judaic studies at New York University. Thousands moved, primarily from Lithuania.

Diner says the first generation of Irish Jews mostly worked as peddlers. But by the 20th century, peddlers became business owners.

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5:52am

Sun March 17, 2013
It's All Politics

Documentaries Help Amplify Conservative Voice

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 2:11 pm

Phelim McAleer directed the film FrackNation, one of more than 20 documentaries screened at this year's CPAC.
Mike Groll AP

A decade ago, there were only one or two documentary films screening at CPAC, the annual meeting of conservative activists. This year, there were more than 20.

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5:52am

Sun March 17, 2013
Author Interviews

Tsunami Delivers A Young Diarist's 'Tale' Of Bullying And Depression

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 11:32 am

A Tale for the Time Being presents the diary of a friendly, funny and strong-willed 16-year-old girl named Nao. Nao spent her formative years in California, but her family has returned to Japan, and when the book begins, she's living in Tokyo.

Nao tells readers right up front that her diary will be a log of her last few days on Earth: She plans to take her own life, and as the story goes on, readers learn why.

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5:52am

Sun March 17, 2013
Author Interviews

Reminder: Our Memories Are Less Reliable Than We Think

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 11:32 am

Cover of Pieces of Light

What's your first memory? You're a baby or a toddler. Maybe it's a specific experience, maybe an impression. Maybe someone's face, or just a kind of feeling or sense. Or maybe it's a compilation of stories over years. And maybe it's less true than you think it is.

In his new book, Pieces of Light, Charles Fernyhough digs deep into the recesses of memory to figure out what shapes it, how it works and why some things stick with us forever. Fernyhough talks with NPR's Rachel Martin about his own first memory and his exploration of the science of remembering.

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3:29am

Sun March 17, 2013
Sunday Puzzle

Take Your Pics

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 11:32 am

NPR Graphic

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name in which the first word starts with the letters P-I and the second word starts with C. For example, given "One of 27 compositions by Mozart" you would say "(Pi)ano (C)oncerto."

Last week's challenge: Think of two familiar three-word sayings in which all three words are the same length. The middle word in both sayings is the same. In each saying, the first and last words rhyme with each other. What two sayings are these?

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5:03pm

Sat March 16, 2013
Author Interviews

Hatmaker Philip Treacy's Favorite Hat, And Many More

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 10:32 am

In the studio, Feb. 10, 1999
Kevin Davies Phaidon

In 2011, Irish milliner Philip Treacy made waves across the world when he designed 36 different hats for the royal wedding. Remember Princess Beatrice's unforgettable hat? Treacy made that.

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5:14am

Sat March 16, 2013
The Salt

Wine Revolution: As Drinkers And Growers, U.S. Declares Independence

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 12:46 pm

The vineyard at Round Pond Estate in Rutherford, Calif. Napa Valley is just one of wine-growing regions across the country.
Eric Risberg AP

A curious shift has happened in global wine-drinking trends: Americans have overtaken the French and Italians, Europe's traditional lovers of the fruits of the vine, as the world's top wine market.

And it's not just wine drinking that's taken off stateside: U.S. wine production is also on the rise.

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5:14am

Sat March 16, 2013
Author Interviews

Lack Of Conscience Gets A Comeuppance In 'The Accursed'

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 7:46 am

Courtesy Ecco

Something suspicious is going on in Princeton, N.J., in the otherwise sleepy year of 1905. Children turn into stone. Spouses disappear into horse-drawn carriages. Snakes squirm up and down walls. Is it some kind of curse? What could the good people of Princeton have possibly done to bring a curse on themselves?

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5:14am

Sat March 16, 2013
Author Interviews

A Little Blue Alien Helped Hemon Bear Witness To His 'Lives'

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 7:46 am

Since his 2000 literary debut, Aleksandar Hemon has been hailed as "a maestro, a conjurer, a channeler of universes." In books including The Question of Bruno and Love and Obstacles, he's written about archdukes and exiles; a Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina of memories; and a Chicago that's in your face.

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4:03am

Sat March 16, 2013
Movie Interviews

'Leviathan': The Fishing Life, From 360 Degrees

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 7:46 am

The noisy film is mostly wordless, with animals and nature filling in the blanks between its strangely stark images.
The Cinema Guild

Leviathan is a documentary — and yet not a documentary. It's a near-wordless, almost abstract depiction of an 80-foot groundfishing boat heading out of New Bedford, Mass. The film's unusual structure and point of view has gotten rave reviews at festivals and from many critics.

Sometimes you don't know quite what you're seeing and listening to in Leviathan. You hear metal groaning and rasping, see fish, gloves and tools tossed about on a boat that's pitching and rolling in a roaring wind.

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