Arts

11:38am

Wed March 13, 2013
NPR Story

Write A Little Everyday, You'll Have A Book

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 11:51 am

Samantha Loomis Paterson

Katherine Paterson is the beloved author of many young adult novels, including Jacob Have I Loved, The Great Gilly Hopkins and Bridge to Terabithia.

The American Library Association recently honored her with the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for her "substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children."

Paterson, who has been writing for a half-century, tells NPR's Michel Martin that despite all the awards she has received throughout the years, this one means a lot.

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8:31am

Wed March 13, 2013
Book Reviews

Rewriting The Self In Gass' Dense, Difficult 'Middle C'

Piano keys
iStockphoto.com

William H. Gass is a glutton of language. Like a chef who can't cook without nibbling, he lards his own writing with similes and metaphors in the spirit of the books he loves, savoring them through imitation. In his essays on literature, this gusto is contagious. You want to taste his taste, to read what he has read. Gass' exuberant, bursting sentences convey the pleasure of reading and thinking better than just about any written since the New Critics took over criticism in the 1950s.

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7:17am

Wed March 13, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Michael Vick Cancels Book Tour Because Of Threats

Michael Vick of the Philadelphia Eagles on the sidelines during a game against the Arizona Cardinals.
Christian Petersen Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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2:32am

Wed March 13, 2013
Kitchen Window

Outside The Pizza Box: Chicago's New Pie Scene

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 9:57 am

Emily Hilliard for NPR

As we prepare to celebrate Pi(e) Day on Thursday (Congress established March 14 as a day to honor both the mathematical constant, 3.14, and our nation's favorite dessert), we find a burgeoning pie scene in Chicago. And it's not of the deep-dish variety.

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4:03pm

Tue March 12, 2013
Arts & Life

Muses And Metaphor 2013: Tweet Us Your Poetry!

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 11:50 am

Melanie Taube NPR

Poetry and social media join forces once again in April. Tell Me More celebrates National Poetry Month with its 3rd annual Muses and Metaphor series. We'll feature poems exchanged via Twitter by NPR fans — always in 140 characters or fewer. Tweet your poem using the hashtag: #TMMPoetry.

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2:19pm

Tue March 12, 2013
Book Reviews

'Lean In': Not Much Of A Manifesto, But Still A Win For Women

AP

Sheryl Sandberg tells an anecdote in her new book, Lean In, about sitting down with her boss, Mark Zuckerberg, for her first performance review as chief operating officer at Facebook. Zuckerberg told her that her "desire to be liked by everybody would hold [her] back." I hope she's worked on that problem because over the past few weeks, there sure have been a lot of people hating on Sheryl Sandberg.

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2:05pm

Tue March 12, 2013
Arts & Life

Backstage At The Bolshoi Ballet

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 4:29 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan.

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11:43am

Tue March 12, 2013
History

First African-American Poet Still Showing New Work

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 4:42 pm

Newly found poem by Jupiter Hammon.
Courtesy of Yale University Libraries

It's the handwriting that stands out to Cedrick May.

As an associate professor of English at the University of Texas, Arlington, he assigned his doctoral students to find some of the known works by Jupiter Hammon, the first published African-American poet. Hammon's works date back to 1760.

What one student ended up finding was a previously unpublished piece by the poet that shows how deeply he thought about slavery and religion.

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7:38am

Tue March 12, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Hippies Were Dirty And Liked Music By Satanists, Louisiana Textbook Claims

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 10:00 am

Paintings adorn the "Magic Bus" on display at a museum built on the site of the 1969 Woodstock music festival.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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7:03am

Tue March 12, 2013
Book Reviews

The Mundane World Illuminated In 'Hand-Drying In America'

Ben Katchor's syndicated comic strips vary in subject — his Julius Knipl: Real Estate Photographer, for example, explores the surreal underside of our urban environment by documenting the inner lives of the spaces and storefronts we walk past every day, while The Cardboard Valise reads like a Fodor's guide to a country that exists only in Franz Kafka's dream journal.

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