Arts

12:24pm

Mon November 26, 2012
Author Interviews

Jonathan Kozol On Kids That Survive Inner Cities

Originally published on Tue November 27, 2012 10:36 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we'll meet the star of the new film "Life of Pi," based on the best-selling novel by Yann Martel. The film is getting rave reviews for its amazing special effects, as well as the performance of the young man we are going to meet in a few minutes for whom this was his first professional acting job. That's coming up.

Read more

7:03am

Mon November 26, 2012
You Must Read This

Strange Fruit And Stranger Dreams In The Deep South

Steve Stern's most recent book is called The Book of Mischief.

I'm about to make insane claims for a book, so the skeptics among you can stop reading now. It's called The Battlefield Where the Moon Says I Love You — an outrageous title, I know. Plus, it's an epic poem, over 500 almost entirely unpunctuated pages in its original edition. Are you still with me? Then trust me, it's like no other book in our literature.

Read more

7:02am

Mon November 26, 2012
Book Reviews

Short Stories To Savor On A Winter Weekend

Originally published on Sat December 29, 2012 5:38 pm

Nishant Choksi

Hortense Calisher, a virtuoso of the form, once called the short story "an apocalypse in a teacup." It's a definition that suits the remarkable stories published this year by three literary superstars, and two dazzling newcomers with voices so distinctive we're likely to be hearing from them again. These stories are intense, evocative delights to be devoured singly when you have only a sliver of time, or savored in batches, at leisure, on a winter weekend.

Read more

4:50am

Mon November 26, 2012
Author Interviews

Memoir Traces How Cartoonist Lost Her 'Marbles'

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 9:45 am

iStockphoto.com

When you think of mental illness, you don't often think of comics; but for cartoonist Ellen Forney, the two came crashing together just before her 30th birthday. That's when she found out she has bipolar disorder, a diagnosis that finally explained her super-charged highs and debilitating lows.

Read more

4:49am

Mon November 26, 2012
The Salt

No Innocent Spice: The Secret Story Of Nutmeg, Life And Death

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 2:42 pm

This copper engraving from approximately 1700 depicts the condition of the English prisoners at the hands of the Dutch. In the 1660s, Cornell University's Eric Tagliacozzo says, the conflict and competition for the spice trade came to a head. "The Dutch decapitated a number of English merchants who were also in the Spice Islands trying to profit from the trade."
WikiCommons

Ah, nutmeg! Whether it's sprinkled on eggnog, baked into spice cake or blended into a latte, this pungent spice can evoke memories of holidays past. We tend to link it to celebratory times.

Read more

4:08pm

Sun November 25, 2012
Author Interviews

Uncovered Letters Reveal A New Side Of William Styron

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 5:00 pm

William Styron was one of the flamboyant literary figures of the 20th Century. He was a Southerner whose novel Lie Down in Darkness received immense acclaim when he was just 26 years old. He would go on to write the Confessions of Nat Turner, for which he received the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1968.

But for the last 27 years of his life, Styron did not write a novel. He battled depression, and wrote a seminal work about it, Darkness Visible, in 1990.

Read more

7:33am

Sun November 25, 2012
Author Interviews

'The Missing Ink' And The Intimacy Of Writing

When Philip Hensher realized he didn't know what his best friend's handwriting looked like, he decided to write a book. Host Rachel Martin speaks with Hensher about that book, The Missing Ink: The Lost Art of Handwriting.

6:31am

Sun November 25, 2012
The Salt

Real Chefs Grind It With A Mortar And Pestle

Originally published on Thu November 29, 2012 8:44 am

The mortar and pestle can be found in kitchens around the world, including Thailand. In the United States, chef Tanasapamon Rohman uses the tool to grind up chili paste and pulverize rice at her Thai restaurant.
Jessical Spengler Flickr

Chefs these days stock all sorts of high-tech tools, from liquid nitrogen to $500 blenders. But in kitchens throughout the world, there's one piece of technology that's been the same since the Stone Age: the mortar and pestle.

Read more

6:11am

Sun November 25, 2012
Author Interviews

Old Newspapers, New Perspectives On The American Revolution

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 7:33 am

Courtesy of Sourcebooks

Time has a way of condensing major historical events into a few key moments, with one-dimensional, legendary figures at the forefront. In his new book, author and archivist Todd Andrlik gives life and depth to one such event — the American Revolution. He uses newspaper reporting from that era to provide a sense of the Revolution as it actually unfolded.

Read more

12:03am

Sun November 25, 2012
Sunday Puzzle

A Puzzle More Delicious Than A Chard Shard

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 7:33 am

NPR Graphic

On-air challenge: Every answer consists of a made-up two-word phrase in which the first word starts with CH, and the second word is pronounced the same as the first except with an SH sound. (The spelling may or may not change.) For example, given the clue "some Central African fish," the answer would be "Chad shad."

Read more

Pages