Arts

11:38am

Wed March 27, 2013
The Salt

The Wonderful World Of Whisky Art

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 11:44 am

courtesy of Ernie Button

Ernie Button was putting a Scotch glass left out overnight into the dishwasher when he noticed something — a white, chalky film on the bottom of the glass. He held it up to the light and, upon closer inspection, could see a series of fine, lacy lines running along the inside of the glass.

As a hobbyist photographer whose work often focuses on showcasing the beauty of everyday objects, Button was intrigued by this discovery. "Wow, there's something to that," he recalls thinking.

Read more

11:25am

Wed March 27, 2013
Books

Debut Novel Tackles African Immigrant Stereotypes

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 3:34 pm

Ghana Must Go author Taiye Selasi.
Nancy Crampton Penguin Press

Taiye Selasi brings the African immigrant experience to readers in her debut novel, Ghana Must Go.

The novel begins with the Sai children preparing to travel from the United States to Ghana for the funeral of the family patriarch, Kweku Sai. Before they leave, Selasi gives readers a glimpse into the events that unfolded while they were growing up in the Boston suburb of Brookline, Mass.

Read more

7:13am

Wed March 27, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Fifty Shades Of Greenbacks: Random House Profits Jump

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 10:18 am

cover of Fifty Shades Freed

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more

7:03am

Wed March 27, 2013
Books

Learning 'Life' Lessons With McCorkle's Seniors

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 1:18 pm

promo image
iStockphoto.com

Amid a literary landscape increasingly rife with metafictional and postmodern high jinks, Jill McCorkle's sixth novel, Life After Life, is as resolutely down to earth and unpretentious as the hot-dog franchise owned by one of her characters. For her first novel in 17 years, McCorkle has dared to write a heartwarmer that takes place largely in a retirement home and stresses the importance of good old-fashioned kindness.

Read more

1:43am

Wed March 27, 2013
Kitchen Window

Lamb For Four Sundays, Four Ways

Whitney Pipkin for NPR

It's 9 a.m. on a Sunday, and my bathrobe and hair already reek of garam masala — burnt garam masala, to be exact. Who'd have known that the key to this Indian-Pakistani recipe for lamb biryani would be the French cooking mantra of mise-en-place? Or that the minute it takes for the pile of spices to get "aromatic" in hot oil is not nearly long enough to both measure and photograph them before they turn to ashes?

Read more

3:59pm

Tue March 26, 2013
Author Interviews

You're So Dumb, You Probably Think This Book Is About Getting Slapped

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 5:58 pm

Oxford University Press

William Irvine is a philosophy professor by day, but he has an unusual sideline: He's also a collector of insults. Irvine has gathered some of his favorite jibes into a new book called A Slap in the Face: Why Insults Hurt — And Why They Shouldn't.

Irvine tells NPR's Audie Cornish that one of his favorite masters of insult is Winston Churchill. "Nancy Astor [said] to Winston Churchill, 'if you were my husband, I would put poison in your coffee,' " Irvine says, to which Churchill replied, " 'If you were my wife, I would drink it.' "

Read more

1:33pm

Tue March 26, 2013
Author Interviews

'Angry Days' Shows An America Torn Over Entering World War II

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 3:30 pm

Before Pearl Harbor, aviator Charles Lindbergh was so vocal about his opposition to U.S. involvement in World War II that he became an unofficial leader of America's isolationist movement.
AP

During the debate over whether to invade Iraq, or whether to stay in Afghanistan, many people looked back to World War II, describing it as a good and just war — a war the U.S. knew it had to fight. In reality, it wasn't that simple. When Britain and France went to war with Germany in 1939, Americans were divided about offering military aid, and the debate over the U.S. joining the war was even more heated. It wasn't until two years later, when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor and Germany declared war against the U.S., that Americans officially entered the conflict.

Read more

12:39pm

Tue March 26, 2013
The Salt

An Oral History Of New York Food: Dining Out Wasn't Always 'In'

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 11:42 am

A pushcart fruit vendor at the Fulton fish market in New York City in 1943
Gordon Parks Library of Congress

As Marcel Proust so famously documented, it's often the simplest of foods that can carry us back to remembrances of things past.

And so perhaps it's not so surprising that, when freelance food writer Anne Noyes Saini began asking New York's elderly residents about their memories of the foods of the city during the early- to mid-20th century, it was humble meals like baked beans and the fruits sold by old-timey wagons that most often came to mind.

Read more

12:37pm

Tue March 26, 2013
Monkey See

Tweaks, Retooling, And When To Give Up: A Tale Of Two Singing Shows

Adam Levine, Shakira, Usher, and Blake Shelton make up the adjusted judging panel on NBC's The Voice.
Adam Taylor NBC

As The Voice returns to NBC this week for its fourth season, viewers are seeing two new, if quite familiar, faces as Shakira and Usher occupy the coaches' seats vacated by Christina Aguilera and Cee Lo Green. Its talent-show rival over on Fox, The X Factor, will also see two new judges when (if? no, "when," surely) it comes back in the fall.

So why does The Voice seem so healthy and The X Factor so wobbly?

Read more

7:13am

Tue March 26, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Wis. Governor Takes Heat Over His Choice Of Ghostwriter

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speaks during the Republican National Convention on Aug. 28, 2012.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more

Pages