Arts

11:53am

Tue April 2, 2013
The Picture Show

How A Female Photographer Sees Her Afghanistan

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 5:44 pm

A photograph taken from behind a burqa, Kabul, 2007.
Farzana Wahidy AP

Born in Kandahar, Afghanistan, in 1984, photographer Farzana Wahidy was only a teenager when the Taliban took over the country in 1996. At age 13 she was beaten in the street for not wearing a burqa, she recalls, and she describes those years as a "very closed, very dark time." To carry a camera would have been unthinkable.

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7:19am

Tue April 2, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: American Library Association, Barnes & Noble Called 'Facilitators Of Porn'

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 9:21 am

A Barnes & Noble bookstore in Washington, D.C.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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7:03am

Tue April 2, 2013
First Reads

Exclusive First Read: 'Julio's Day,' By Gilbert Hernandez

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 8:16 am

Julio's Day introduction by Brian Evenson, author of Windeye.


"...one day we were born, one day we shall die, the same day, the same second, is that not enough for you?" — Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot

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7:03am

Tue April 2, 2013
Book Reviews

In 'Life After Life,' Caught In The Dangerous Machinery of History

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 9:56 pm

iStockphotos.com

Flannery O'Connor said short stories need to have a beginning, a middle and an end, though not necessarily in that order. But what about novels? Kate Atkinson seems to believe there can be a beginning, a middle and an end, and then another beginning, plus several more middles ... and why not have a beginning again?

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7:03am

Tue April 2, 2013
Book Reviews

Minks, Perfume And Beastly Beauty In 'Shocked'

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 11:14 am

Peter North Getty Images

Beauty can be a beast. That's one message from Shocked, Patricia Volk's smart, fascinating book about her complex relationship with her beautiful, elegantly attired, hypercritical mother.

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5:17pm

Mon April 1, 2013
Theater

Nora Ephron's 'Lucky Guy' And Tom Hanks Make Their Broadway Debuts

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 8:57 pm

Nora Ephron's final play, Lucky Guy, tells the story of controversial New York columnist Mike McAlary, played by Tom Hanks. (Also pictured: Peter Gerety as John Cotter).
Boneau / Bryan-Brown

Several years ago, when Nora Ephron handed Tom Hanks an early draft of Lucky Guy, her play about tabloid journalist Mike McAlary, he had a pretty strong reaction.

"I said, 'Well, that guy's sure a jerk!' I used another word besides jerk — I know what you can say on NPR," he says. "And she laughed and she said, 'Well, he kinda was. But he was kinda great, too.'"

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5:17pm

Mon April 1, 2013
All Tech Considered

'Bioshock Infinite': A First-Person Shooter, A Tragic Play

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 9:19 pm

BioShock Infinite revolves around an Aristotelian tragedy with tragic heroes, grounded in a floating city set in 1912.
Courtesy of Irrational Games/2K Games

In a first-person shooter video game, your targets range from zombies to soldiers, aliens or any other variation of "enemy." Most people wouldn't call that art. But BioShock Infinite creator Ken Levine says he's aiming to transform the genre.

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3:41pm

Mon April 1, 2013
Shots - Health News

Mining Books To Map Emotions Through A Century

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 10:18 am

When anthropologists tallied the use of emotional words through a century of literature, they included many books without clear emotional content — technical manuals, for example, and automotive repair guides.
Steve Debenport iStockphotography

Were people happier in the 1950s than they are today? Or were they more frustrated, repressed and sad?

To find out, you'd have to compare the emotions of one generation to another. British anthropologists think they may have found the answer — embedded in literature.

Several years ago, more or less on a lark, a group of researchers from England used a computer program to analyze the emotional content of books from every year of the 20th century — close to a billion words in millions of books.

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2:34pm

Mon April 1, 2013
The Salt

Sandwich Monday: The Chili Bomb

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 2:43 pm

Chili Bombs with a side of Totally Unnecessary Cheese Sauce.
NPR

The problem with chili has always been this: When you try to eat it with your hands, you get terrible burns and weird looks from the snooty side of your family at the 2007 Chillag Family Reunion. Speaking of which — why don't you guys just go back to your solid gold houses and your Harvard "utensils" and leave me alone? I am who I am.

Anyway, the great Wiener and Still Champion in Evanston, Ill., has solved this problem with the Chili Bomb. It's chili, mixed with melted cheese, wrapped in cornbread and fried.

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1:54pm

Mon April 1, 2013
Remembrances

Listening Back To An Interview With Phil Ramone

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 10:15 am

Phil Ramone in New York in 1997.
Ken Weingart Getty Images

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. We're going to remember the record producer and engineer Phil Ramone who died Saturday at the age of 79. He won 14 Grammys. He started his career as an engineer, recording singers like Lesley Gore, Dusty Springfield and Dionne Warwick. He went on to produce recordings by Paul Simon, Billy Joel, Barbara Streisand, Ray Charles and Tony Bennett as well as the original cast recording of Stephen Sondheim's "Passion."

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