Arts

6:13pm

Mon April 15, 2013
The Two-Way

Granta's 'Best Of Young British Novelists' Shows A 'Disunited Kingdom'

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 7:36 pm

Once every decade, the literary magazine Granta publishes an issue called "Best of Young British Novelists," with short excerpts from the novels of 20 emerging authors. In the past, the list of names has proved unusually prescient, with authors such as Salman Rushdie, Martin Amis and Zadie Smith featured before they were widely read.

Read more

4:24pm

Mon April 15, 2013
Movies

On The Big Screen, The Tax Guy Can Be Your Buddy

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 10:02 pm

The paying and collecting of taxes might not be the sexiest plot point in an industry that depends on sizzle. But that doesn't mean revenuers haven't made their mark on screen.
Airyelf iStockphoto.com

It's fair to say that the bakery employees who hooted and jeered "tax maaaaaan" when mild-mannered auditor Will Ferrell showed up in Stranger than Fiction were no fans of the Internal Revenue Service. In that, they're like a lot of us, no?

So it's intriguing that Hollywood generally treats tax inspectors as nice guys. On the big screen, it's typically their IRS bosses who are the bad ones.

Read more

4:19pm

Mon April 15, 2013
The Two-Way

2013 Pulitzers Honor Sharon Olds, Adam Johnson, New York Times

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 9:37 am

The new batch of Pulitzer Prize winners has just been announced, with novelist Adam Johnson winning the fiction prize with The Orphan Master's Son. The winners of the prizes for Americans' best work in journalism, drama, music, and writing also receive a $10,000 cash award.

Read more

2:05pm

Mon April 15, 2013
Author Interviews

Pretending To Be A 'Good Nurse,' Serial Killer Targeted Patients

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 3:55 pm

In a new book, Charles Graeber tells the story of Charlie Cullen, a registered nurse who was was dubbed "The Angel of Death" by the media after he was implicated in the deaths of as many as 300 patients.
Twelve Books

In 2003, police in Somerset County, N.J., arrested a hospital nurse named Charlie Cullen who was suspected of injecting patients with lethal doses of a variety of medications. Cullen would turn out to be one of the nation's most prolific serial killers, murdering dozens, perhaps hundreds of people in nine hospitals over a 16-year period.

Journalist Charles Graeber spent six years investigating the Cullen case, and is the only reporter to have spoken with Cullen in prison. In his new book, The Good Nurse, Graeber pieces together the elements of Cullen's story.

Read more

1:03pm

Mon April 15, 2013
Monkey See

Real TV Listings: In Which People Play Musical Chairs On Television

Participants on Oh Sit! do whatever Oh Sit! requires them to do.
Greg Gayne The CW

Oh Sit! (The CW, 8:00 p.m.): When the CW first announced that it was going to have a show called Oh Sit!, which would basically be a game of musical chairs with a punny scatological name, it seemed like it would be exciting in its sheer stupidity. But as it turns out, having seen the previews, it seems like it's really just ABC's Wipeout in disguise. I feel defrauded somehow, as if I was promised a wretchedness diamond and received a cubic zirconia.

Read more

11:53am

Mon April 15, 2013
NPR Story

Poet Elizabeth Alexander Muses About Spring

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 1:27 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Next, the latest in our series Muses and Metaphor. That's how we're celebrating National Poetry Month. We're hearing your Twitter poems of 140 characters or less. Today, we hear from renowned poet Elizabeth Alexander. You might remember her from President Obama's first Inauguration in 2009. She composed and read the poem, "Praise Song for the Day" for that occasion. Not only that, she's published six volumes of poetry. She's chair of the African-American Studies Department at Yale University.

Read more

11:15am

Mon April 15, 2013
Monkey See

Superheroines, Fighters, And Why Isn't There A Wonder Woman Movie?

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 2:41 pm

Katie, who's nine years old, explains her love of Wonder Woman in a new documentary.
Vaquera Productions

Any comics fan of any seriousness can rattle off female superheroes who have either had their own books or appeared in other or ensemble books.

But what about ordinary absorbers of culture?

The same people who don't actually read comics but can tell you that Superman is the idealized, square-jawed fighter for good, while Batman is the darker, more conflicted survivor of tragedy and Spider-Man is the scrapper barely concealing an ordinary kid — how many women can they name who have worn capes, particularly ones that aren't superhero derivatives like Supergirl or Batgirl?

Read more

8:47am

Mon April 15, 2013
Monkey See

Let's Rush To Judgment: 'Catching Fire'

Screenshot

After the huge success of The Hunger Games, both movie and book, it seems like a foregone conclusion that there's enormous pent-up demand for the next chapter of the film adaptation, Catching Fire. This is the book where Katniss' story becomes much more explicitly political, and her status as a revolutionary and a warrior is more fully realized.

Read more

7:10am

Mon April 15, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Yoko Ono Is Writing A Book Of 'Instructional Poetry'

Yoko Ono poses during the opening of her exhibition "half-a-wind show" in Frankfurt, Germany.
Daniel Roland AFP/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more

7:03am

Mon April 15, 2013
Books

Tall Glass Of Rock Star-Ness: A Q&A With Questlove

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 9:38 am

Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson also teaches a class at New York University called "Topics in Recorded Music: Classic Albums."
Ben Watts Courtesy of the artist

Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson is the drummer and co-founder of the Grammy-Award winning band The Roots, which now serves as the house band for the talk show Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. Questlove is coming out with a memoir in June called Mo' Meta Blues, co-written with Ben Greenman. After reading it, you'll feel like you know Questlove. The book is intimate and funny. Plus, you'll come away with a crash course in hip-hop history.

Read more

Pages