Arts

11:50am

Mon April 29, 2013
Arts & Life

Listeners Muse About Flowers And Tacos

Tell Me More is celebrating National Poetry Month by hearing poetic tweets from listeners for the 'Muses and Metaphor' series. Today's poems cover Texas, Tennessee and tacos.

11:50am

Mon April 29, 2013
Theater

Behind The Curtain Of 'Disgraced'

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, the story of one of the world's biggest and most destructive industries, tourism. Author Elizabeth Becker talks about the explosion in travel since the Cold War.

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8:31am

Mon April 29, 2013
Monkey See

Everywhere But Here, 'Iron Man 3' Is Already Huge

Iron Man 3 doesn't open in North America until this Friday (May 3), but this weekend, it's already up and whomping The Avengers at the international box office. The new adventures of Tony Stark, directed and co-written by Lethal Weapon screenwriter Shane Black, brought in $195.3 million. That beat a mere $185.1 million when The Avengers opened internationally to make it the biggest opening weekend ever in a bunch of countries, including Argentina and Indonesia.

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7:27am

Mon April 29, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Feminist Icon Mary Thom Dies In Motorcycle Crash

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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7:03am

Mon April 29, 2013
Poetry

From Dissections To Depositions, Poets' Second Jobs

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 2:00 pm

Monica Youn, who joined NPR as a NewsPoet last year, works as a lawyer. She says that poetry appears in law more often than you might think — but nobody calls it poetry.
Doriane Raiman NPR

"No man but a blockhead," Samuel Johnson famously observed, "ever wrote, except for money." This is tough news for poets, since the writing they do is often less immediately profitable than a second-grader's math homework (the kid gets a cookie or a hug; the poet gets a rejection letter from The Kenyon Review). Poetry itself is tremendously valuable, of course, but that value is often realized many years after a poem's composition, and sometimes long after the end of its author's life.

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7:03am

Mon April 29, 2013
New In Paperback

April 22-May 5: Julia Child, Jonathan Franzen And Herta Muller

* Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:28am

Mon April 29, 2013
Author Interviews

A Grieving Brother Finds Solace In His Sister's 'Small Town'

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 12:21 pm

Brother and sister Rod Dreher and Ruthie Leming grew up in a small town in rural Louisiana. Dreher left the tightknit community to pursue a journalism career but returned home after Leming died of lung cancer in 2010.
Courtesy Rod Dreher

When he was a teenager, journalist Rod Dreher couldn't wait to escape Louisiana. Now he has found his way home again in grief — after his sister's death from lung cancer. It was "in light" of that tragedy, Dreher says, that he discovered the value of community. It's the subject of his new book, The Little Way of Ruthie Leming: A Southern Girl, a Small Town, and the Secret of a Good Life.

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3:24am

Mon April 29, 2013
Architecture

How One Family Built America's Public Palaces

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 11:52 am

The elaborately tiled City Hall subway station in New York City — still extant but now closed to the public, alas — used the Guastavino touch to convince wary city dwellers to head underground for a train trip.
Michael Freeman National Buildling Museum

A Washington, D.C., museum wants you to spend some time looking up — to see soaring, vaulted tile ceilings built by a father-son team who left their mark on some of America's most important public spaces.

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4:56pm

Sun April 28, 2013
Author Interviews

Iran's Political Scene Is Sketchy For Cartoonists

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 12:32 pm

"War" by Touka Neyestani: Neyestani received a degree in architecture from Tehran's Science and Industry University, and has been a cartoonist for more than 30 years.
International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran

Iranian newspapers are rife with cartoons. They are a tradition, and play a big role voicing criticism of the country's authoritarian regime.

Increasingly, though, Iranian cartoonists have been imprisoned, received death threats, or gone into exile because of their work.

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7:09am

Sun April 28, 2013
Poetry

Dilruba Ahmed: An Outsider Turns To Poetry

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 6:40 pm

promo image

April is National Poetry Month, and to celebrate, Weekend Edition is talking with younger poets about why they chose to write poetry and why it's still important in our everyday lives. This week, we spoke to Bangladeshi-American poet Dilruba Ahmed.

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