Arts

11:25am

Fri May 10, 2013
Barbershop

Does It Matter 'Hero' Charles Ramsey Has A Criminal Past?

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 12:09 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds. Sitting in the chairs for a shape-up this week are writer and culture critic Jimi Izrael, with us in Washington, D.C.

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10:22am

Fri May 10, 2013
Ask Me Another

'Plus One' With Wesley Morris

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 10:07 am

Film critic Wesley Morris (right) faces off against a fellow movie buff in front of a crowd at the Wilbur Theatre in Boston.
Mettie Ostrowski

New movies — especially sequels — hit theaters so quickly these days, it can be hard to tell what's worth checking out. So we thought it would be fitting to call upon the Boston-based, Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic Wesley Morris for some clarity.

Morris chats with host Ophira Eisenberg about whether it was hometown bias that led him to predict that Argo would take home the Oscar for Best Picture, and exemplifies how difficult it can be for a lifelong film scholar to narrow down an answer to the question, "What is your favorite movie?"

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10:22am

Fri May 10, 2013
Ask Me Another

'Product Placement' With Lois Lowry

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 10:07 am

Lois Lowry plays a game called "Product Placement" on the Ask Me Another stage at Wilbur Theatre in Boston.
Mettie Ostrowski

Popular soft drinks, sports cars and other brands appear surreptitiously placed in the worlds of our favorite TV shows and films all the time. Soon enough, we may see them name-dropped in our books, too.

To help imagine some egregious-yet-hilarious examples of this, we invited a prolific writer to Ask Me Another: award-winning young adult author Lois Lowry. Lowry joins forces with a fellow book-loving contestant to play "Product Placement," a game in which they must combine the titles of famous literary works with the names of household products and companies.

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10:22am

Fri May 10, 2013
Ask Me Another

Barney Frank: The Comedian's Politician

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 10:07 am

Former U.S. Rep. Barney Frank as Ask Me Another's Very Important Puzzler, at the Wilbur Theatre in Boston.
Mettie Ostrowski

Retiring in 2013 after 32 years as a member of the House of Representatives, Barney Frank took on his greatest challenge yet: joining Ask Me Another at the Wilbur Theatre in downtown Boston for an evening of trivia.

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10:03am

Fri May 10, 2013
Books

Questions For Eduardo Halfon, Author Of 'The Polish Boxer'

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 4:23 pm

Eduardo Halfon is the author of The Polish Boxer.
Paula Morales

Guatemalan author Eduardo Halfon is this week's Alt.latino guest DJ, and he's a natural choice; his new book, The Polish Boxer, is a series of semi-autobiographical stories woven through with loving references to jazz and classical music.

Alt.latino host Jasmine Garsd had this to say about The Polish Boxer:

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9:59am

Fri May 10, 2013
Monkey See

Loving 'Gatsby' Too Much And Not Enough

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 1:19 pm

Carey Mulligan and Leonardo DiCaprio in Baz Luhrmann's The Great Gatsby.
Daniel Smith Warner Brothers Pictures

[I really hope it goes without saying that this piece about the film adaptation of a decades-old novel gives away the plot of a decades-old novel. But: Be aware.]

The sheer zazz that Baz Luhrmann introduces into The Great Gatsby is so imposing in quantity that it's surprising that it can get out of the way enough not to be the biggest problem in the movie. Luhrmann, after all, loves his swooping cameras and party scenes, and Gatsby gives him the best excuse for excess that there is: a story about excess.

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3:13am

Fri May 10, 2013
Food

Unpacking Foreign Ingredients In A Massachusetts Kitchen

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 8:10 am

A kitchen renovation revealed some unusual items Laurel Ruma had picked up while traveling: chickpea flour, harissa and chia seeds.
Laurel Ruma

This is the second installment of NPR's Cook Your Cupboard, a food series about improvising with what you have on hand. Got a food that has you stumped? Submit a photo and we'll ask chefs about our favorites!

Laurel Ruma, an NPR listener from Medford, Mass., didn't realize quite how much she had gathered up from her travels until renovating her kitchen last summer. She unearthed things like harissa, chickpea flour and black chia seeds.

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6:09pm

Thu May 9, 2013
Media

In Newsrooms, Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 5:41 pm

Protesters demonstrate in downtown Orlando, Fla., on May 1, 2006. Most news outlets have long abandoned the use of the term "illegals."
Roberto Schmidt AFP/Getty Images

Journalists make choices all the time that influence our understanding of the news — the choice of what stories to cover, which people to interview, which words to use. And major news organizations have been reconsidering how best to describe a group of people whose very presence in this country breaks immigration law.

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5:03pm

Thu May 9, 2013
Movie Reviews

In 'Sightseers,' A Killing Spree Gone South

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 10:17 am

Tina (Alice Lowe) and Chris (Steve Oram) in the sour social comedy Sightseers.
Ben Wheatley IFC Films

Scrub away the gore and the nastier bits of provocation, and Ben Wheatley's Sightseers belongs squarely in the tradition of British classics like Kind Hearts and Coronets and The Ruling Class — satires that transformed simmering class resentment into brittle, nasty dark comedy.

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5:03pm

Thu May 9, 2013
Movie Reviews

'Gatsby's' Jazz-Age Excess, All Over The Screen

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 10:38 am

A 'Great Gatsby'? Leonardo DiCaprio suits up to play the mysterious, magnetic title character in Baz Luhrmann's exuberantly turbulent film adaptation of the F. Scott Fitzgerald novel.
Warner Bros. Pictures

If anyone could pull off a multiplex-friendly adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby — a film treatment that might be capable of stepping out of the long shadow cast by the book — it's Baz Luhrmann, right? The Australian director who dragged Shakespeare's star-crossed lovers into the music-video-shaken, bullet-ridden '90s with Romeo + Juliet and compressed a century's worth of pop music and melodrama into the glorious Moulin Rouge?

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