Arts

5:17pm

Sat August 15, 2015
Author Interviews

The Transformation Of The LAPD — And The Work That Remains

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 6:56 pm

Emily Bogle NPR

High-profile, officer-involved fatalities across the country have put police departments everywhere under more scrutiny than ever.

For a lesson in how to move forward, they could look at the history of the Los Angeles police.

In the '80s and '90s, Los Angeles was trapped in a cycle of crime, crack and gang warfare. Investigative journalist Joe Domanick says back then, the Los Angeles police just made things worse with its crime-fighting strategy — which involved using military-style tactics to subdue and arrest suspects, who were mostly from minority neighborhoods.

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2:19pm

Sat August 15, 2015
Monkey See

A Historic Fight Over Public Housing Makes For Fine Drama On HBO

Oscar Isaac as Mayor Nick Wasicsko.
Paul Schiraldi HBO

One of the accusations that was often leveled against Mad Men as an examination of social problems was that it paused too often to scoff at how foolish (or sexist, or racist, or environmentally ignorant) everyone was in the 1960s, as if we've outgrown all of it. One of the best things about Show Me A Hero, HBO's dense but involving examination of a dispute over the construction of low-income housing in Yonkers, N.Y. in the 1980s is that there's no smugness to it.

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10:46am

Sat August 15, 2015
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!

Not My Job: Dwight Yoakam Gets Quizzed On The World's Happiest Man

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 11:47 am

Ethan Miller Getty Images

Songwriter Dwight Yoakam was raised in Ohio — a big disadvantage for a country singer. But he overcame that handicap to become a country star, with multiple platinum albums and hit songs over the past few decades.

And as a country singer, he has shared many stories of woe with his fans. So we invited him to play a game we're calling "You're the happiest man in the world" — three questions about Matthieu Ricard, a French-born Buddhist Monk who's reputed to be happier than all the rest of us.

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10:03am

Sat August 15, 2015
Summer of Love

Love Lines: A Summer Sampler Of Romantic Manga

Romance comes in many forms — and never so many as in manga. Let loose in the black-and-white planes of comic-book reality, an army of creators has envisioned every schmooptastic scenario imaginable. But even setting aside certain extremes (Male pregnancy? A guy whose true love gets miniaturized and stuck to his forearm?) it's still a daunting field. Where's a reader to start? Why, right here.

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7:43am

Sat August 15, 2015
Television

HBO's 'Hero' Tells A Slow Story In Too Many Hours

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 10:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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7:43am

Sat August 15, 2015
Architecture

People Love Art Museums — But Has The Art Itself Become Irrelevant?

Originally published on Mon August 17, 2015 9:39 am

Vermeer's Girl with a Pearl Earring stares back at cellphones at the Frick Collection in New York City. "The art museum used to offer objects, works of art, the finest that we have," Lewis says. "And it's gone from offering objects to offering an experience."
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

How much is a visible work of genius worth? In May, a 1955 painting by Pablo Picasso was sold at auction for more than $179 million, the highest price at auction ever. And attendance at major art museums is booming.

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7:43am

Sat August 15, 2015
Author Interviews

Dealing With Freedom — And Disaster — In 'Fortune Smiles'

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 10:36 am

Fortune Smiles by Adam Johnson
Emily Bogle NPR

Adam Johnson won the 2013 Pultizer Prize for his bestselling novel, The Orphan Master's Son, set in the nightmare state of North Korea. This summer, he has come out with a collection of short stories, set in locales that range from California to East Germany to a techno-dreamlike South Korea.

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7:03am

Sat August 15, 2015
Book Reviews

The Blazing World Of Clarice Lispector, In 'Complete Stories'

Originally published on Mon August 17, 2015 11:06 am

In 1948, Clarice Lispector wrote a moving letter to her sister Tania, offering some pointed advice: "Have the courage to transform yourself," she wrote, "to do what you desire." It's a fairly simple exhortation, and yet I wonder how many people can't manage it, how many squander their entire lives, their deep wants and ambitions on the altar of fear and uncertainty. Lispector herself was determined not to be one of them.

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7:03am

Sat August 15, 2015
The Salt

Canada's Historical Fare Reimagined For The Modern Diner

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 11:59 pm

This dish — mussels smoked in pine needles and pine ash butter — was inspired by a 1605 recipe that the explorer Samuel de Champlain made for his men while traveling through Canada. It's one of many historically inspired items on the menu at the Toronto restaurant Boralia.
Courtesy of Nick Merzetti

A server at Boralia lifts the foggy glass dome over a dish of briny mussels, releasing the smoky essence of pine and campfire. According to Evelyn Wu, co-owner of this Toronto restaurant, the dish dates back to 1605, and is based on a recipe that French-born explorer Samuel de Champlain made for his men while traveling in Canada.

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5:30am

Sat August 15, 2015
Movie Interviews

'60s Spies Hit The Big Screen, With Guy Ritchie Flair

Originally published on Mon August 17, 2015 11:19 am

Henry Cavill (left) and Armie Hammer star as CIA agent Napoleon Solo and KGB agent Illya Kuryakin in Guy Ritchie's reboot of The Man From U.N.C.L.E.
Daniel Smith Warner Bros. Pictures

Napoleon Solo and Illya Kuryakin have enjoyed lengthy careers — especially for men in a business as dangerous as spying.

The American and Soviet CIA agents had a wildly popular run on TV in The Man From U.N.C.L.E. in the '60s. But long after the show came off the air, Solo and Kuryakin bantered on — in a handful of movies, dozens of books, a few comics, countless reruns and the popular imagination.

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