Arts

3:48am

Sun June 16, 2013
Parallels

Burning Down The House: Artistic Freedom Under Fire In Egypt

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 3:50 am

Egyptian employees of the Cairo Opera House and opponents of Egypt's Islamist President Mohamed Morsi hold placards during a demonstration inside the opera's compound in Cairo on May 30, following the dismissal of the head of the opera house. The firing is the latest salvo in a cultural war between artists and the ruling Muslim Brotherhood.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

On the morning of Oct. 28, 1971, Egypt woke up to a shock: The Khedivial Royal Opera House was on fire. The 100-year-old, rococo-style architectural gem in downtown Cairo burned to ashes. Ballet costumes, theater sets, musical instruments and velvet curtains were all gone.

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3:02am

Sun June 16, 2013
Sunday Puzzle

You'd Better Sit Tight For This One

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 2:08 am

NPR Graphic

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name in which the first word starts SI and the second word starts with T. For example, given "unadorned set of facts," you would say, "simple truth."

Last week's challenge: Name a movie in two words — five letters in each word. Both words start with vowels. Take one letter in the first word, move it two spaces later in the alphabet, and rearrange the result. You'll get the second word in the movie's title. What movie is it?

Answer: After Earth

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5:15pm

Sat June 15, 2013
Movies I've Seen A Million Times

The Movie Jesse Eisenberg Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 7:15 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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5:03pm

Sat June 15, 2013
Around the Nation

Fighting Unwanted Cat Calls, One Poster At A Time

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 6:19 pm

New York artist Tatayana Fazlalizadeh uses posters to combat unwanted cat calls and attention from men in her neighborhood.
Courtesy of Tatayana Fazlalizadeh

It's hard to go unnoticed in New York City, with everyone checking out the latest fashions and hairstyles. As the weather warms, some women who are shedding those winter layers are finding themselves the object of more cat calls, whistles and roving eyes than they'd like.

Artist Tatayana Fazlalizadeh is not going to take it anymore.

Under the cover of darkness, wearing a black knit hit, black leather jacket and black Chuck Taylors, Fazlalizadeh is nearly invisible. She's scouring Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, for a blank canvas.

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5:03pm

Sat June 15, 2013
Author Interviews

Telling Stories About Ourselves In 'The Faraway Nearby'

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 6:19 pm

Brian Jackson iStockphoto.com

Rebecca Solnit begins her new memoir, The Faraway Nearby, with a question: "What's your story?"

"It's all in the telling," she says. "Stories are compasses and architecture; we navigate by them, we build our sanctuaries and prisons out of them, and to be without a story is to be lost in the vastness of the world that spreads in all directions like arctic tundra or sea ice."

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8:00am

Sat June 15, 2013
StoryCorps

Following The Moon, Dad Seeks Military Son's Resting Place

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 4:40 pm

Robert Stokely and his son, Michael, who died on deployment in Iraq in 2005.
Courtesy of Robert Stokely

"While he was in Iraq, at night I couldn't sleep," Robert Stokely says of his son, Michael.

Sgt. Michael Stokely served in the Georgia Army National Guard. He was deployed to Iraq in 2005.

"I used to look at the moon a lot," Robert says, "and I told Mike, 'When you see the moon, know that eight hours later I'll see it too, and I'll think about you.' "

On Aug. 8, 2005, Michael called his father, and Robert asked if he would still be coming home in two weeks. "I can't take this anymore," he said.

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8:00am

Sat June 15, 2013
Author Interviews

Family Tragedy With A Hollywood Connection In 'Run, Brother, Run'

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 4:40 pm

David Berg is a big-name Texas lawyer who founded his own firm and has won cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. He's also been a civil rights activist and a Clarence Darrow-style defender of the damned: disgraced politicians, grungy protesters and celebrities.

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5:24am

Sat June 15, 2013
Author Interviews

Gaiman's New 'Ocean' Is No Kiddie Pool

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 4:40 pm

Neil Gaiman, one of the world's most beloved fantasy authors, has won the Hugo and Bram Stoker awards, and the Newberry Medal — and now he's written his first novel for adults in eight years.

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3:51am

Sat June 15, 2013
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!

Not My Job: Astronaut Buzz Aldrin On Getting Mooned

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 11:14 am

AFP AFP/Getty Images

You probably know that Neil Armstrong was the first man on the moon. But that guy in all the pictures from the first moon landing? That's Buzz Aldrin. So here's a lesson for you all: It doesn't matter if you're the first guy out of the spaceship, just as long as you make the other guy hold the camera.

So sure, Aldrin has been to the moon, but what does he know about mooning? We've invited him to play a game called "Drop your pants and take a bow" — three questions about exposing one's buttocks.

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3:22pm

Fri June 14, 2013
Movie Reviews

It Takes A (Gay) Village In 'Call Me Kuchu'

David Kato, a teacher and LGBT rights activist — as well as the first openly gay man in Uganda — is at the forefront of Call Me Kuchu's story.
Cinedigm

Horrific and uplifting, the excellent documentary Call Me Kuchu is partly framed as a portrait of David Kato, Uganda's first openly gay man. An activist of enormous courage and persistence — against odds that make the U.S. fight for marriage equality seem like a cakewalk — Kato was a savvy political strategist, with wit, charm and joie de vivre to burn. And he loved a good party, with his friends in drag where possible. But he was terrified of sleeping alone on his farm.

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