Arts

4:05am

Tue July 2, 2013
Code Switch

Does Disney's Tonto Reinforce Stereotypes Or Overcome Them?

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 1:00 pm

Johnny Depp says that with his portrayal of Tonto in The Lone Ranger, he tried to "right the wrongs of what had been done with regards to the representation of Native Americans in cinema."
Disney

The Lone Ranger has long been a fictional hero, taming the Wild West with his trusty Indian guide, Tonto. The faithful companion helps the white man fight bad guys, and does so speaking in pidgin English.

Tonto made his first appearance on the radio in the 1930s, voiced by a non-Native American actor, John Todd. In the series, Western settlers face down what they call "redskins" and "savages." And trusty Tonto is always on hand to interpret the smoke signals.

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6:11pm

Mon July 1, 2013
The Salt

Taking High-Heat Tandoor Techniques To The Backyard Grill

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 7:24 am

Punjabi Lamb Kebabs, like many tandoor dishes, can also be made on gas or charcoal grills.
Christopher Hirsheimer

In America, summer grilling generally means heading to the backyard and throwing some hot dogs, burgers and maybe vegetable skewers on the fire. But in India and Pakistan, where summers last for seven months, grilling takes on a whole new level of sophistication.

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4:41pm

Mon July 1, 2013
Movie Reviews

Branagh Imagines Mozart's 'Magic Flute' In Wartime

Pamina (Amy Carson) and Tamino (Joseph Kaiser) in Kenneth Branagh's production of Mozart's The Magic Flute.
Revolver Group

Mozart's The Magic Flute, the last opera he lived to complete, has some of his most sublime and sublimely comic music. Technically, it's more of a musical comedy, what in German is called a Singspiel, a play with songs and spoken dialogue. I was excited to learn that it was filmed by Kenneth Branagh, whose Shakespeare movies I really admire. Mozart's mixture of fairy tale and high morality presents a great opportunity for a filmmaker; in 1975, Ingmar Bergman released a version for Swedish television that has become a beloved classic.

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3:29pm

Mon July 1, 2013
Author Interviews

From Kids' Books To Erotica, Tomi Ungerer's 'Far Out' Life

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 4:00 pm

Tomi Ungerer's 1967 book Moon Man follows its lonely protagonist as he visits Earth for the very first time.
Tomi Ungerer

Children's-book writer Maurice Sendak learned a lot from author and artist Tomi Ungerer. In Far Out Isn't Far Enough, a new documentary about Ungerer, Sendak says, "I learned to be braver than I was. I think that's why [Where The Wild Things Are] was partly Tomi โ€” his energy, his spirit.

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1:58pm

Mon July 1, 2013
The Salt

Sandwich Monday: The Famous St. Paul Sandwich (of St. Louis)

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 12:28 pm

This exists.
NPR

Since Sandwich Monday began, certain sandwiches have been our white whales: the Hippogriff Burger, a Reuben signed by J.D. Salinger, an Actual White Whale sandwich. Also, the mysterious St.Paul sandwich, native to St. Louis: It's an egg foo young patty, with lettuce, pickle and mayo, on white bread. But we finally caught one.

Miles: This is the same sandwich my Model U.N. group made the first time we all got high together.

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8:07am

Mon July 1, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Penguin, Random House Complete Publishing Mega-Merger

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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7:03am

Mon July 1, 2013
New In Paperback

July 1-7: 'Hallucinations,' Hollywood Fame And Covert Operations

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 11:20 am

Knopf

* Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:02am

Mon July 1, 2013
Crime In The City

Rotenberg's Toronto Thrillers Mix Canadian Courtesy With Murder

From the Toronto Islands รขย€ย” one of many real-life Toronto locales in Robert Rotenberg's legal thrillers รขย€ย” visitors have a clear view of the city's skyline.
Sean Dawsean Flickr

Robert Rotenberg has written four legal thrillers set in Toronto, that old industrial city on the shores of Lake Ontario. He's a criminal lawyer โ€” all his books are centered on trials โ€” and he loves his city so much that he makes multicultural Toronto a character in his books. His first release, Old City Hall, is even named after a Toronto landmark: a beautiful stone building that is now used as a courthouse.

Real Courtrooms, Real Courtesy

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6:56pm

Sun June 30, 2013
Movies

Casting Call: Hollywood Needs More Women

Originally published on Sun June 30, 2013 7:35 pm

Actress Geena Davis addresses the audience at the "Driving Financial Success: Women + Movies = Bigger Box Office" luncheon at CinemaCon 2013.
Chris Pizzello AP

Summer is the perfect time for a night out at the cinema, but maybe you've noticed something missing at the movies: women.

Women make up a minority of movie creators: 7 percent of directors, 13 percent of writers and 20 percent of producers; that's nearly five men for every woman working behind the scenes.

Out of last year's biggest movies, 28 percent of speaking characters were female. That's down from a third just five years ago, according to the Annenberg School at the University of Southern California.

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4:05pm

Sun June 30, 2013
Author Interviews

How One Woman Nearly Deciphered A Mysterious Script

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 12:17 pm

An ancient tablet contains records written in Linear B โ€” a script that was discovered in the 19th century and remained undeciphered for decades.
Sharon Mollerus Wikimedia Commons

Critics have called Margalit Fox's new book, The Riddle of the Labyrinth, a paleographic detective procedural. It follows the story of the laborious quest to crack a mysterious script, unearthed in Crete in 1900, known by the sterile-sounding name Linear B.

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