Arts

1:51pm

Tue July 16, 2013
Music Reviews

Sylvester: 'Mighty Real' Disco Star Deserves A Modern Spotlight

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 4:29 pm

Sylvester's 1978 album Step II resulted in a couple of smash singles, "Dance (Disco Heat)" and "You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real)."
Fantasy Archives

12:45pm

Tue July 16, 2013
The Salt

Local Sake: America's Craft Brewers Look East For Inspiration

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 1:29 pm

Yoed Anis, president of the Texas Sake Company, says "the only constraint holding us back" from faster growth is the absence of a sufficient and consistent rice supply.
Courtesy Texas Sake Company

Most of us are familiar with that hot, musky-smelling, cloudy drink served in teacups at sushi bars and sometimes called, erroneously, "rice wine." In other words, most of us have had bad sake.

But finally, Americans are learning to love the good stuff.

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11:13am

Tue July 16, 2013
Monkey See

Morning Shots: In Which Kristin Wiig Gets Very Silly

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 12:37 pm

iStockphoto.com

7:19am

Tue July 16, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Zimmerman Juror Drops Book Plans

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 8:40 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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7:03am

Tue July 16, 2013
Book Reviews

For The Love Of The Game: How Cricket Transformed India

Cricket Game
iStockphoto.com

The English language and cricket were Britain's two largest colonial legacies in India, says journalist James Astill, but it is the second of these bequests that is the subject of his important and incisive new book, The Great Tamasha: Cricket, Corruption, And the Turbulent Rise of Modern India. Astill is a former bureau chief for the Economist in New Delhi, and he notes the parallels between the country's control of cricket and its dramatic economic rise.

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7:03am

Tue July 16, 2013
Book Reviews

Last Words: An Author's Rhymed Farewell

David Rakoff was a radio essayist for public radio's This American Life.
Deirdre Dolan

What a loss. That's the thought that kept running through my head as I flagged one inspired rhyme after another in David Rakoff's risky (though hardly risqué) posthumous first novel. Why risky? For starters, Rakoff, who died of cancer last summer, at 47, chose to write this last book in verse — albeit an accessible, delightful iambic tetrameter that is more akin to Dr. Seuss than T.S. Eliot.

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7:03am

Tue July 16, 2013
Critics' Lists: Summer 2013

Lost And Found: 5 Forgotten Classics Worth Revisiting

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 4:25 pm

Andrew Bannecker

I don't remember when I first realized that books could go away, that they could — and did — pass into obscurity or out of print. Myra Breckinridge by Gore Vidal, All About H. Hatterr by G.V. Desani, Speedboat by Renata Adler, the sublime An Armful of Warm Girl by W.M. Spackman. Each of them, snuffed out. It seemed a scandal. But I vividly recall becoming aware that particular books were prone. To take chances with language or form was to court extinction.

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6:13pm

Mon July 15, 2013
Books News & Features

Aparecium! J.K. Rowling Revealed As 'Cuckoo' Mystery Author

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 6:54 pm

Rowling says writing under a pseudonym was a "liberating experience."
Debra Hurford Brown

It's a detective story — about a detective story. The book in question is The Cuckoo's Calling, a debut novel released earlier this year by a former British military man named Robert Galbraith.

The reviews were excellent — especially for a first novel. There was just one hitch: The Cuckoo's Calling wasn't a debut at all. Nor was it by Robert Galbraith. As The Sunday Times revealed this weekend, Galbraith is a pseudonym for one of the best-known writers working today: Harry Potter creator J.K. Rowling.

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5:37pm

Mon July 15, 2013
Books News & Features

How Scholastic Sells Literacy To Generations Of New Readers

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 6:13 pm

Scholastic started out in 1920 as a four-page magazine written for high school students. Above, an early issue published in September 1922.
Courtesy of Scholastic

Chances are you have had contact with Scholastic Publishing at some point in your life: You might have read their magazines in school, or bought a book at one of their book fairs, or perhaps you've read Harry Potter or The Hunger Games? From its humble beginning as publisher of a magazine for high schoolers, Scholastic has become a $2 billion business and one of the biggest children's book publishers in the world.

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5:17pm

Mon July 15, 2013
The Salt

The Secret To Georgian Grilled Meats? Grapevines And Lots Of Wine

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 3:27 pm

Shashlik cooks on a hot grill. Kakheti, the easternmost province in the Republic of Georgia, is known for meats grilled over grapevines, which burn quickly, leaving a heap of finger-sized coals.
Nick Grabowski via Flickr

Tucked between Russia and Turkey, the Republic of Georgia is renowned for great food: cheese dishes, pickles, breads and stews. This is a cuisine that you should not miss.

And on summer evenings in the capital, Tbilisi, the air is fragrant with the smells of one of Georgian cookery's highlights: grilled meat, or shashlik.

You can find good shashlik at restaurants with white tablecloths, but the very best in all Tbilisi is said to be at a roadside stop called Mtsvadi Tsalamze. It's an unassuming place with rows of wooden picnic tables in an open yard.

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