Arts

7:44am

Sun July 21, 2013
Author Interviews

Living With Tragedy And Fright In A 'Beautiful Place'

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 7:02 pm

Howard Norman's memories of the strange incidents of his life compose his memoir. In 2003, his family rented their house to a poet, who killed her son and then herself in the Normans' home. Norman, his wife and daughter decided to continue living there, giving a certain weight to the title of his memoir, I Hate To Leave This Beautiful Place.

But his book begins in a very different place, with the story of Norman's childhood, a bookmobile and a swan.

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6:24am

Sun July 21, 2013
PG-13: Risky Reads

A Gut-Punch Of Sadness In James Joyce's 'Dubliners'

Kevin Maher is the author of The Fields, which comes out in the U.S in August.

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6:05am

Sun July 21, 2013
Sunday Puzzle

The Price Of Fame: A Scrambled Name

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 12:41 pm

NPR Graphic

On-air challenge: Every answer is the name of a famous person, past or present, with five letters in the first and last names. One letter in each name is changed to make a new word. You name the people.

Last week's challenge: In the phrase "clothes closet," all the letters of the second word can be found inside the first. Think of another two-word phrase that means a place to keep clothes in which all the letter of the second word are found inside the first. The first word has nine letters, the second has six.

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5:10pm

Sat July 20, 2013
Author Interviews

'No Regrets': A Murder Mystery, Tangled In Life's Troubles

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 5:34 pm

iStockphoto.com

South Florida has been irresistible for crime writers, among them Carl Hiaasen, Edna Buchanan and Harry Crews. Now John Dufresne, most famously the author of the novel Louisiana Power and Light, has joined that list with his first mystery novel.

No Regrets, Coyote is Dufresne's eighth novel, and it begins with the killing of an entire family in the fictional South Florida town of Eden. When the police get to the scene of the crime, they find a typed note, which they insist is a suicide letter.

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7:54am

Sat July 20, 2013
NPR Story

Neorealism Goes Hollywood

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 4:48 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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7:54am

Sat July 20, 2013
Movies

European Films In Russia's Heartland

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 4:48 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer. For the past few years, in July the Russia provincial town of Vologda has hosted a European Film Festival. Vologda is a sleepy city far from the Russian metropolises of Moscow and St. Petersburg, and every year the arrival of European filmmakers and actors to the Russian heartland is a very special event.

This year, NPR's Eleanor Beardsley attended the festival.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELLS RINGING)

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7:54am

Sat July 20, 2013
Deceptive Cadence

A Veteran's Piercing True Story Leaps From Page To Stage

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 6:26 pm

The Long Walk, Brian Castner's memoir of PTSD and a difficult homecoming, will soon be an opera.
YouTube

Iraq veteran Brian Castner wrote a book about his struggle with post-traumatic stress disorder for his kids, so they could someday know what he'd been going through when he came home from war.

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7:03am

Sat July 20, 2013
Author Interviews

Q&A: Director Henry Jaglom, Author Of 'My Lunches With Orson'

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 9:33 am

In the final years of his life, Orson Welles regularly met his friend and business partner Henry Jaglom for lunch in L.A. to discuss future projects, old anecdotes, and Hollywood gossip. Jaglom, a filmmaker in his own right (his work includes A Safe Place, Someone to Love, and Festival in Cannes), kept a tape recorder running in his bag — which Welles requested, according to Jaglom, to accumulate material for an autobiography.

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4:58am

Sat July 20, 2013
The Salt

From Ramen To Rotini: Following The Noodles Of The Silk Road

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 7:22 pm

In Turkey, bits of meat are wrapped in squares of pasta to make manti.
thebittenworld Flickr

Popular lore has it that the Italian merchant Marco Polo was responsible for introducing the noodle to China. This legend appeals to Italians, but if you ask the Chinese, they may beg to differ.

In her latest book, On the Noodle Road, author Jen Lin-Liu chronicles a six-month journey along the historic Silk Road from eastern China, through central Asia, Turkey, Iran and eventually arriving in Italy, in search of the true origin of the noodle.

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7:40pm

Fri July 19, 2013
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!

Comedian Tig Notaro Plays Not My Job

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 1:53 pm

Courtesy of Ruthie Wyatt

In 2012, comedian Louis C.K. tweeted: "In 27 years doing this, I've seen a handful of truly great, masterful standup sets. One was Tig Notaro last night at Largo." The set C.K. was referring to was Notaro's performance the day she was diagnosed with Stage 2 breast cancer. That set became "Tig Notaro: Live," which is now out now on iTunes.

We've invited Notaro to play a game called "Tig, meet Tug." Frank Edwin McGraw, known as Tug, was one of the great relief pitchers in baseball, or at least the most colorful. We'll ask Notaro three questions about her near-namesake.

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