Arts

1:32pm

Mon August 12, 2013
The Salt

Sandwich Monday: The Jim Shoe

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 2:20 pm

Behold.
NPR

The Chicago sandwich containing gyro meat, roast beef and corned beef goes by many names. This is one of many ways in which it's like the devil, and Sean Combs. People call it the Gym Shoe, the Jim Shoe or the Jim Shoo.

Ian: With a name this unappetizing, the sandwich had no choice but to be so delicious no one would mess with it. It's like A Boy Named Shoe.

Blythe: I thought I'd need my Reebok Stomach Pumps for this.

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12:50pm

Mon August 12, 2013
Author Interviews

Behind 'The New Black': The Real Piper's Prison Story

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 11:18 am

Taylor Schilling plays Piper in Netflix's Orange Is the New Black, which is based on Piper Kerman's memoir of her year in prison.
Jessica Miglio Netflix

Piper Kerman was a 24-year-old Smith College graduate in 1993, when she flew to Belgium with a suitcase of money intended for a West African drug lord.

This misguided adventure started when she began a romantic relationship with a woman who was part of what Kerman describes as a "clique of impossibly stylish and cool lesbians in their mid-30s." That woman was involved in a drug-smuggling ring, and got Kerman involved, too, though Kerman left that life after several months.

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12:43pm

Mon August 12, 2013
Book Reviews

Addictive 'Infatuations' Takes A Metaphysical Look At Crime

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 1:48 pm

iStockphoto.com

If you're like me, you probably feel exhausted just thinking about how much cultural stuff is out there. A friend recently told me he was reading an acclaimed Hungarian novelist whose books I've never opened. "Please tell me he stinks," I begged, "so I don't have to read him."

"Actually, he's great," came the reply, and I groaned. This was something I didn't want to know.

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12:10pm

Mon August 12, 2013
Art & Design

Powwow Party Flub Leads To Fashion Line

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 12:40 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

And now we turn to a very different kind of fashion/history story. Last year, clothing and accessories line Paul Frank hosted a powwow and dream catcher party that offended a lot of people, not just Native Americans. Bloggers like Adrienne Keene demanded an apology and the company obliged. But Paul Frank Industries didn't stop there. They decided to team up with native designers to create a line that showcases art from the many Native American cultures.

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8:31am

Mon August 12, 2013
Monkey See

Can You Really Dissolve A Guy In A Bathtub? 'Mythbusters' Tackles 'Breaking Bad'

Adam Savage and Aaron Paul trade some information on Monday night's Mythbusters.
Don Feria Discovery

Perhaps you heard that last night, a plucky little drug dealer named Walter White returned to television for his last eight episodes of the award-hoarding Breaking Bad.

But before he began his life of crime, Walter White was a chemistry teacher, and chemistry is what originally made him such a great meth cook. Breaking Bad has always included a lot of science talk, especially in the early days, and the time has come for someone to see whether it holds up.

And by "someone," I mean "Mythbusters."

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7:09am

Mon August 12, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Does Lance Armstrong Have The Right To Lie In His Memoirs?

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 9:47 am

Lance Armstrong is being sued for false claims in his books, which were marketed as nonfiction.
Nathalie Magniez Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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5:13am

Mon August 12, 2013
Theater

'One Night In Miami', More Than Clay Beats Liston

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 8:53 am

Transcript

RENE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We're going to hear now about a play on stage here in Los Angeles, though it's set in another hot city, it's called "One Night In Miami," and it's based on a real event. On February 25th, 1964, the young Cassius Clay defeated world heavyweight champion Sonny Liston. Clay, who would soon change his name to Muhammad Ali, celebrated his victory in a small hotel room with three of the most prominent African-Americans of the time.

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3:06am

Mon August 12, 2013
Keys To The Whole World: American Public Libraries

For Disaster Preparedness: Pack A Library Card?

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 11:43 am

Volunteers at the Queens Library in the Far Rockaway section of Queens hand out coats to people affected by Hurricane Sandy.
AFP/Getty Images

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, libraries in New York helped the storm's victims turn a new page. Librarians helped thousands of people fill out relief forms, connect to the Internet and make plans to rebuild.

The New Dorp branch of the New York Public Library in Staten Island wasn't damaged during Sandy. But just a few blocks away, houses were inundated with as much as 16 feet of water. And days after the storm, many of the library's patrons still lacked the most basic services.

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2:56am

Mon August 12, 2013
Photography

Haunting Images Chronicle 165 Years Of A World At War

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 9:46 am

An American soldier reads a letter from home, while taking a break from repairing a tank tread in Lang Vei, Vietnam, in March 1971.
David Burnett/Contact Press Images

D-Day soldiers landing on Omaha Beach. A naked Vietnamese girl running from napalm. A Spanish loyalist, collapsing to the ground in death. These images of war, and some 300 others, are on view at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., in an exhibition called WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath. Pictures from the mid-19th century to today, taken by commercial photographers, military photographers, amateurs and artists capture 165 years of conflict.

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3:39pm

Sun August 11, 2013
Author Interviews

'Dressing Constitutionally': When Fashion And Laws Collide

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 10:19 am

How short is too short, according to the law? Wardrobe choices, or lack thereof, raise all sorts of issues — from First Amendment concerns to questions of equality, sexuality and control.

Ruthann Robson's new book, Dressing Constitutionally Hierarchy, Sexuality, and Democracy from Our Hairstyles to Our Shoes, examines anecdotes throughout history demonstrating the ways fashion and laws can conflict or influence one another. Robinson talks with Jacki Lyden, host of weekends on All Things Considered, about some of those examples.

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