Arts

5:54pm

Thu September 5, 2013
Arts & Life

Swing Your Partner: W.Va. Circles Back To Square Dancing

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:21 pm

A couple takes to the floor in Harmon, W.Va., in 2012. West Virginia is trying to revitalize its square-dance tradition.
Jessie Wright-Mendoza for NPR

Square dancing, once a pillar of small-town life, is making a comeback in West Virginia. A statewide project is trying to help communities preserve and promote this part of their cultural heritage.

Marlinton, W.Va., is one of the towns taking up the cause. Its square dances can gather a crowd, but residents still worry about attracting the attention of the next generation.

If you go to a square dance in Marlinton, there are some rules to follow. First of all, leave your stereotypes at the door, says Becky Hill, who works on The Mountain Dance Trail initiative.

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5:09pm

Thu September 5, 2013
Movie Reviews

Qwerty Can Be Flirty, If We're In '50s France

Ses Doigts, Sont Adroits: Deborah Francois proves adept with the titular typewriter in Populaire.
Jair Sfez The Weinstein Co.

Devotees of '50s Hollywood comedies could have a great time at Populaire, an intentionally lightweight ode to romance and, uh, typing. But the way to enjoy this French souffle is to concentrate on the scrupulously retro music, costumes and set design, not on the musty fairy-tale script.

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5:03pm

Thu September 5, 2013
Movie Reviews

Mommy Issues, Or: It's Always Sonny In Cougartown

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 10:48 am

It's a family film: Xavier Samuel and Robin Wright play one of two intergenerational couples at the center of Anne Fontaine's Adore, a film that dares to ask: "Does it count as a mommy issue if you're sleeping with her lifelong best friend?"
Exclusive Media

Overused and much misused, the word "provocative" has become a double-edged sword, especially when it's swung in the direction of independent cinema. At its best, the genuinely provocative film — off the top of my head, anything by Bunuel, Shaun of the Dead, Holy Motors -- shocks in order to expand our vision of the world it encompasses. At its most dispiriting, it's an exercise in cheap thrillage, designed to goose a presumptively stuffy bourgeois audience while positioning a director as some sort of iconoclast.

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11:56am

Thu September 5, 2013
Movies

Autism: Film Shows Education Challenges For Young Adults And Families

Best Kept Secret is a film that follows a group of young adults with autism during their last year of high school. Host Michel Martin speaks with filmmaker Samantha Buck and Janet Mino, a special education teacher.

11:43am

Thu September 5, 2013
The Salt

Fad Diets Will Seem Even Crazier After You See This

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 12:52 pm

The 7-Day Color Diet: An attempt to get people to eat more fruits and vegetables, this diet requires followers to eat foods of just a single color each day. It ends with a day in which you "eat the rainbow," so to speak. Here's Gonot's cheeky take on orange day.
Stephanie Gonot Courtesy of the photographer

On one level, it's easy to understand the allure of a fad diet: Eat this, not that and you'll lose weight, guaranteed. Who doesn't want an easy way to shed unwanted pounds?

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10:58am

Thu September 5, 2013
Theater

In Small Spaces, Theater-Makers Are Telling Big Stories

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 4:44 pm

Talk Of The Town: Mia Vallet and Joe Tippett star in Ashville, the newest of the five-show Hill Town Plays cycle from playwright Lucy Thurber. Currently being staged by a consortium of New York theater companies, it's just one of several large-scale stage projects on schedules this fall.
Sandra Coudert

Monologist Mike Daisey has a new story to tell, and if you want to hear it, then you'd better settle in. It's going to take a month to get through it.

In one sense, All the Faces of the Moon, starting Sept. 5 at the Public Theater in New York, is a collection of 29 different monologues, which Daisey will perform consecutively and for one night only. Each piece has its own narrative, so even if they see just one installment, audiences can have a complete experience.

Pull back, though, and the project becomes a single massive opus — one that runs about 44 hours.

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10:40am

Thu September 5, 2013
Parallels

Lions, Leaders And Lingerie: 5 Great Reads From Syria

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 8:41 am

A Syrian book vendor waits for customers at his street stall in the old city of Damascus, Syria, on Sept. 24, 2011.
Muzaffar Salman AP

What does President Bashar Assad think of himself? How did his father, Hafez Assad, rise from a dirt yard to rule the country? What happens to those who speak out against the regime? Who wrote the Syrian 1984? Does Syria make the best lingerie in the Middle East? Find the answers to these questions in our roundup of five great books about Syria, recommended by experts at Harvard University, Brown University and the University of Texas at Austin.

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10:25am

Thu September 5, 2013
Ask Me Another

Charming Old Moviehouse

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

You're listening to ASK ME ANOTHER from NPR and WYNC. I'm Ophira Eisenberg and coming up, we'll find out if Jonathan Coulton is the walrus or the egg man in a game where we desecrate yet another Beatles' tune. Plus, we'll find out how much NPR's quiz show master Peter Sagal knows about his coworkers. But joining us right now are JJ Orgera and Justin Sheen.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Justin, if you could live in the fictional space of any television show, which one would you like to go into?

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10:25am

Thu September 5, 2013
Ask Me Another

I Am Not The Walrus

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

On stage right now we have Raya Elias-Pushett and Jonathan Firestone.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Raya, you are visiting from Florida.

RAYA ELIAS-PUSHETT: Yes. That's correct.

EISENBERG: Where do you live in Florida?

ELIAS-PUSHETT: I live in Aventura, which is Miami-ish.

EISENBERG: Miami-ish. Got it. OK. And you are there for college?

ELIAS-PUSHETT: Well, I'm from Aventura but I go to the University of Florida. Go Gators.

EISENBERG: Oh, nice. OK. Go Gators. Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

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10:25am

Thu September 5, 2013
Ask Me Another

Peter Sagal: The Oddly Informative Quiz Show Host

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:59 pm

Ask Me Another host Ophira Eisenberg chats with Wait, Wait...Don't Tell Me! host Peter Sagal onstage at The Bell House in Brooklyn, N.Y., about how to host the perfect public radio game show.
Josh Rogosin NPR
  • Bonus 1: Peter Sagal reveals his inner (and outer) nerd
  • Bonus 2: Peter Sagal on rebellion, motorcycles and parenting

When NPR listeners want to test their knowledge of current events — and laugh in the process — they tune in to Wait, Wait...Don't Tell Me!, NPR's news quiz. In every episode, host Peter Sagal quizzes panelists and contestants on a smattering some of the week's most oddball events, from the eccentricities of world leaders to failed robberies.

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