Arts

3:23pm

Tue September 24, 2013
Author Interviews

'Reaped' Is A Reminder That No One Is Promised Tomorrow

iStockphoto.com

After winning a National Book Award for her novel Salvage the Bones, Jesmyn Ward has written a memoir that's framed by the deaths of five young men in her life. The cause of each death was different, but she sees them all as connected to being poor and black in the rural South:

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7:45am

Tue September 24, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: 'Captain Underpants' Tops List Of Most-Challenged Books

Scholastic Inc.

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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7:03am

Tue September 24, 2013
Book Reviews

Noir Storytelling And Art Thievery In Living Color In 'RASL'

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 3:48 pm

It's drunk lightning. No, more of an Escherian stair step. Whatever you decide to call it, expect to spend a fair amount of the time you're reading Jeff Smith's RASL obsessing over the antihero's nose. Smith's dark tale of a dimension-jumping scientist, whose name is pronounced "razzle," is relayed in a jaggy style that couldn't be more different from that of the artist's Pogo-esque epic Bone. And smack in the middle of almost every panel, like a squiggle of punctuation for this comic's many idiosyncrasies, is RASL's strange schnoz.

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3:59am

Tue September 24, 2013
The Salt

This Elegant, Whimsical Pop-Up Dinner Party Had 4,000 Guests

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 11:15 am

At Diner en Blanc ("Dinner in White"), people arrive dressed all in white. They bring their own food and, fittingly,” white wine.
John Moore Getty Images

On a gorgeous night, some 4,000 people, dressed all in white, have come to dine in a public, yet secret place in New York's Bryant Park.

They have come for Diner en Blanc, an unusual pop-up event that takes place in 20 countries. The guests eat in splendor at a location they only learn about minutes before they arrive. The thousands wave white napkins to signal the beginning of the event.

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3:58am

Tue September 24, 2013
Author Interviews

Stephen King On Getting Scared: 'Nothing Like Your First Time'

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 11:10 am

Stephen King is the author of more than 50 books, including The Shining, Carrie and The Dark Tower series.
Shane Leonard Courtesy of Scribner

Remember the first time you felt really terrified — and liked it? "Being scared is like sex," Stephen King says. "There's nothing like your first time."

For a lot of readers, King's 1977 horror novel The Shining may have been their first fictional scare. "An awful lot of the people who read The Shining were like 14 years old, they were at summer camp, they read it under the covers with a flashlight on," King tells NPR's David Greene.

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5:25pm

Mon September 23, 2013
The Salt

Raising Tastier Sea Urchins For Foodies And The Environment

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 7:09 pm

Sea urchins are considered a culinary delicacy, but supply can't keep up with demand.
Aizat Faiz Flickr

Sea urchins are considered a culinary delicacy in many parts of the world, including Japan and the United States. The market for this "foie gras of the sea" is growing rapidly — so fast that supply can't keep up with demand.

But a scientist in Birmingham, Ala., says he's found a solution: He's built a sea urchin farm in his lab and has even developed a food for them to make them taste better. Now, he wants to take his tasty urchins out of his farm and into restaurants across the country.

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4:54pm

Mon September 23, 2013
Remembrances

Ghanaian Poet Kofi Awoonor Among Those Slain In Nairobi Attack

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 8:38 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now we pause to pay tribute to one of the victims of the attack in Nairobi: Kofi Awoonor, who was born in Ghana in 1935. In a distinguished career that spanned politics, diplomacy and teaching, Awoonor is best-known as one of Africa's most accomplished poets.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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2:49pm

Mon September 23, 2013
The Salt

Sandwich Monday: The Woody Allen

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 5:36 pm

The Woody Allen. There's a quarter in this photograph to give you a sense of scale, but it's so tiny you can't see it.
NPR

So many great sandwiches have been named after great directors: the reuben, named for the great Ingmar Reuben, and the cheese sandwich, named for James Cameron. The Carnegie Deli in New York created the "Woody Allen," and our own Eleven City Diner here in Chicago copied it "oh so close." It's a double-decker corned beef and pastrami on rye.

Ian: Boy, the pastrami at this place is really good. And in such large portions!

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2:08pm

Mon September 23, 2013
Movie Interviews

'12 Years' Star Alfre Woodard: 'You're Never Too Young For The Truth'

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 7:40 pm

Alfre Woodard as Mistress Harriet Shaw and Lupita Nyong'o as Patsey in 12 Years a Slave.
Fox Searchlight Pictures

Alfre Woodard has been a familiar face on television over the course of her three-decade career. She was up for an Emmy Award on Sunday for her role in the Lifetime remake of Steel Magnolias. She didn't win that one, but she still has on her mantle previous Emmys for programs like The Practice and L.A. Law. Woodard is also a powerful presence on the big screen, as evidenced by her Oscar nomination for the 1983 film Cross Creek and roles in acclaimed features like Primal Fear and Love & Basketball.

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9:40am

Mon September 23, 2013
Monkey See

A Sloppy Emmy Telecast Does The Wrong Song And Dance

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 10:26 am

Neil Patrick Harris hosted the Emmy Awards on Sunday night.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Awards shows aren't easy. That's partly because they're fundamentally unsympathetic affairs in which rich pretty people give each other trophies, and partly because there are only a few real things on which they can be judged: the opening by the host, the montages and features, the speeches, the assorted intangibles and — oh, right — who wins.

By almost any of these measures, Sunday night's Emmy Awards were not only merely bad but really most sincerely bad, or at best (particularly in the case of winners) a bag that's very much mixed.

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