Arts

5:03pm

Thu September 19, 2013
Movie Reviews

A 'Shot' In The Gloom, And All Hell Breaks Loose

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 5:52 pm

Sam Rockwell plays John Moon, an unemployed farmer who launches a series of unfortunate and bloody events after he mistakenly shoots a woman while hunting a deer.
Tribeca Film/Well Go USA Entertainment.

Watch enough TV or movies these days, and you're likely to witness a throat getting slit. Not off-screen, or in a flash, but performed in full view of an unflinching camera. Call it authenticity, call it chutzpah or call it sadism, it takes only a few episodes of, say, Boardwalk Empire or Breaking Bad to realize that our visual storytellers are increasingly going for the gore.

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5:03pm

Thu September 19, 2013
Movie Reviews

'Enough,' Almost, But At Least There's Gandolfini

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 5:40 pm

After James Gandolfini's death this past June, the actor's turn in Enough Said, where he stars opposite Julia Louis-Dreyfus as a man looking for a second chance at love, has taken on a tinge of the bittersweet.
Lacey Terrell Fox Searchlight

It was writer-director Nicole Holofcener's good fortune, and her bad luck, to have snagged James Gandolfini for Enough Said, her comedy about two imminent empty-nesters dipping their toes into fresh romantic waters. Given his untimely death, the film is likely to be remembered less for its own modest virtues than as a last chance to say a bittersweet farewell to its star.

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5:03pm

Thu September 19, 2013
Movie Reviews

From Lebanon To Israel, With An Olive Tree In Tow

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 8:27 am

Zaytoun follows Yoni (Stephen Dorff), an Israeli fighter pilot, and Fahed (Abdallah El Akal), a young Palestinian boy, as they travel together and form an unlikely bond.
Eitan Riklis Strand Releasing

Israeli director Eran Riklis often depicts characters separated by borders. In The Syrian Bride, a Druze woman leaves Israel to marry, knowing she can never return to visit her family; in Lemon Tree, a privileged Israeli woman and a disadvantaged Palestinian regard one another warily from opposite sides of the fence between free and occupied territory.

Zaytoun is different: This time, the director allows his characters to cross the frontier. That makes for a story that's sweeter, but also less convincing.

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5:03pm

Thu September 19, 2013
Movie Reviews

'Prisoners' Of A Story, Bound By That Devil Subtext

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 10:37 am

An underemployed contractor (Hugh Jackman) takes the law --€” and a few things outside it --€” into his own hands with regard to the man (Paul Dano) he suspects has kidnapped his daughter.
Wilson Webb Warner Bros.

If anyone thought Denis Villeneuve's attacks on his favorite targets might be tempered by his move from the art house to Hollywood-thriller territory, Prisoners should shut that line of thinking down in a hurry.

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4:25pm

Thu September 19, 2013
The Salt

Making Food From Flies (It's Not That Icky)

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:14 pm

Black soldier flies mate and lay eggs inside these cages at EnviroFlight.
Dan Charles NPR

In the quirky little college town of Yellow Springs, Ohio, home to many unconventional ideas over the years, there's now a small insect factory.

It's an unassuming operation, a generic boxy building in a small industrial park. It took me a while even to find a sign with the company's name: EnviroFlight. But its goal is grand: The people at EnviroFlight are hoping that their insects will help our planet grow more food while conserving land and water.

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4:25pm

Thu September 19, 2013
Books

Yasmin Thayná: 'I Always Wanted To Make Literature With My Hair'

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 7:07 pm

Brazilian writer Yasmin Thayná, 20, participated in a local program aimed at cultivating artistic talent in low-income communities.
Courtesy of Yasmin Thayná

While NPR's Melissa Block is in Brazil, we'll be showcasing the work of several Brazilian writers. On Tuesday we heard Tatiana Salem Levy's love letter to Rio. Now we turn to 20-year-old Yasmin Thayná, who discovered her love for writing as a teenager when she participated in a local program aimed at cultivating artistic talent in low-income communities.

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2:06pm

Thu September 19, 2013
Author Interviews

Years After Historic Ruling, Execution Still A 'Random' Justice

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 3:44 pm

Execution witness Don Reid stands in the death chamber of the Texas State Penitentiary on July 31, 1972, where he officially watched 189 men die in the heavy oak electric chair. The Supreme Court struck down capital punishment on June 29 of that year.
AP

In the mid-1970s, Arkansas' electric chair was being used by the prison barber to cut hair, and the execution chamber in New Hampshire was being used to store vegetables. That's because in 1972, the U.S. Supreme Court shocked the nation by striking down Georgia's death penalty law, effectively ending executions in the United States. But the decision provoked a strong backlash among those who favored the death penalty, and within four years the high court reversed course and issued a set of rulings that would permit the resumption of executions.

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12:35pm

Thu September 19, 2013
Arts & Life

'House Of Lies' Star Don Cheadle On How To Make It In Hollywood

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 3:15 pm

Don Cheadle is known his roles in Hotel Rwanda, Crash and Ocean's Eleven.
Eric Charbonneau AP

Don Cheadle may be one of Hollywood's quietest superstars. He was known for having high impact in supporting roles before Hotel Rwanda catapulted him to fame. He earned an Oscar nomination for playing the real-life hotel manager who protected more than a thousand Tutsis from the Hutu militia during the Rwandan civil war. Cheadle appeared in other critical and box office hits like Crash and Flight. He's now earned an Emmy nomination for his role in the TV show House of Lies.

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11:54am

Thu September 19, 2013
NPR Story

Meet Armando, Sesame Street's Newest Neighbor

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 5:15 pm

Ismael Cruz Cordova as Armando, with Muppets Rosita and Elmo.
Gil Vaknin

Sesame Street kicked off its new season this week, and it's putting a special focus on Hispanic heritage. There's also a new character on the block: Armando (also known as Mando). He's played by actor Ismael Cruz Cordova, who was born and raised in Puerto Rico. He earned a bachelor's in fine arts from New York University and has appeared in several films and the CBS drama The Good Wife. He's currently performing off-Broadway.

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9:14am

Thu September 19, 2013
Monkey See

Morning Shots: Michel Gondry Does The NFL To A Beat

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 2:15 pm

iStockphoto.com

I cannot understand how I missed the news that Vanessa Redgrave and James Earl Jones are about to open as Beatrice and Benedick in Much Ado About Nothing, but this charming list of past pairings makes me want to watch the play ... a lot. (David Tennant and Catherine Tate!

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