Arts

2:29pm

Mon October 14, 2013
Arts & Life

Bob Mondello Remembers Columbus Day 1963, And A Visit To Camelot

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 9:24 am

President John F. Kennedy enjoys a moment of levity at this Rose Garden ceremony marking Columbus Day, 1963.
AP

Fifty years ago, President Kennedy hosted a Columbus Day ceremony in the Rose Garden, and I was there. Fourteen-year-old me, with my family. This was a fluke. The President had cracked a politically uncool Mafia joke a few days before. Not wanting to offend Italian-American voters, the White House quickly mounted a charm offensive — inviting government workers like my dad, with Italian surnames like Mondello, to celebrate a great Italian explorer, with the president himself.

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2:10pm

Mon October 14, 2013
All Tech Considered

'Menstrual Man' Had An Idea To Help Indian Women

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 3:02 pm

Arunachalam Muruganantham installs his machine in a village in Chhattisgarh, India.
Amit Virmani

Arunachalam Muruganantham had his light bulb moment when he was 29 years old, and holding a sanitary napkin for the first time.

Examining the cotton pads he was buying as a gift for his new wife, the Indian entrepreneur realized that the multinational company that produced them was probably spending cents on raw materials, and making a huge profit.

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12:03pm

Mon October 14, 2013
Author Interviews

One-Stop Shop: Jeff Bezos Wants You To Buy 'Everything' On Amazon

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 12:51 pm

An employee walks through an aisle at Amazon.com's 1.2 million-square foot fulfillment center in Phoenix, Ariz., in November 2012.
Ross D. Franklin AP

In his new book The Everything Store, Brad Stone chronicles how Amazon became an "innovative, disruptive, and often polarizing technology powerhouse." He writes that Amazon was among the first to realize the potential of the Internet and that the company "ended up forever changing the way we shop and read."

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11:53am

Mon October 14, 2013
The Two-Way

Collectible Art At Street Prices: Banksy Sells Pieces For $60

An image from a video posted by Banksy shows a man representing the artist staffing a sidewalk stall featuring signed works for $60. Banksy says he only made $420 Saturday, with one customer negotiating a 2-for-1 discount.
Banksy NY YouTube

New Yorkers who love a good bargain missed a golden opportunity Saturday, when the artist and provocateur Banksy, whose sly graffiti art adorns collectors' walls, opened a sidewalk kiosk in Central Park to sell his work for $60 apiece.

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8:21am

Sun October 13, 2013
Sunday Puzzle

Can You Pass This -TE ST-?

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 8:47 am

NPR

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is an insider's test. Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name with the consecutive letters T-E-S-T. Specifically, the first word will end with -TE and the second word will start ST-. For example, given "sheer force," you would say "brute strength."

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7:49am

Sun October 13, 2013
Author Interviews

Turow Explores Mystical Connections In 'Identical'

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 8:47 am

Scott Turow says some recent research in a case with DNA evidence inspired the plot of his new thriller, Identical. He tells host Rachel Martin about his interest in twins.

7:49am

Sun October 13, 2013
The Salt

With Each Sip Of Whisky, You're Taking A Gulp Of Atmosphere

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 4:48 pm

iStockphoto.com

You know the saying about drinking early in the day: "It's 5 o'clock somewhere in the world."

Well, it turns out that the "somewhere" actually can make a difference when it comes to drinking.

Scientists at Oxford University have found that whisky has a different taste depending on where it's sipped.

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7:03am

Sun October 13, 2013
You Must Read This

'Mezzanine' Takes The Trappings Of Everyday Life To The Next Level

iStockphoto.com

Okay, I admit it. I was going to tell you to read Proust. The thing is, a whole industry already exists around urging you to read Proust, and as well-meaning as those literary evangelists might be, they only end up making you feel unworthy, illiterate and/or lazy.

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5:38am

Sun October 13, 2013
The Salt

(Cabbage) Heads Will Roll: How To Make A Food Network 'From Scratch'

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 8:47 am

According to journalist Allen Salkin, Emeril Lagasse initially opposed bringing Rachael Ray, pictured here in 2007, onto the Food Network – and, at first, Ray agreed with him. "You have this all wrong," she told executives, "I'm beer in a bottle; you guys are champagne."
Scott Gries Getty Images

Mario Batali, Guy Fieri and Rachael Ray are just a few of the stars the Food Network helped create. But what the network gave, it could also take away.

In From Scratch, author Allen Salkin takes an unsparing look at the network's progression from struggling cable startup to global powerhouse, and the people — Emeril Lagasse, Paula Deen — who rose and fell along the way.

Salkin tells NPR's Rachel Martin that while the network was intended for cooks, it wasn't run by them.

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3:34pm

Sat October 12, 2013
Author Interviews

The Surprising Story Of 'Thomas Jefferson's Qur'an'

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 2:53 pm

Thomas Jefferson had a vast personal library reflecting his enormous curiosity about the world. Among his volumes: a Quran purchased in 1765 that informed his ideas about plurality and religious freedom in the founding of America.

In her book Thomas Jefferson's Qur'an: Islam and the Founders, author Denise Spellberg draws parallels between the beliefs of the founding father and religious tolerance in the United States today.

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