Arts

10:44am

Tue October 15, 2013
Monkey See

The Stooges In Winter: Moe, Larry And Curly Drawn Together

The Three Stooges in their younger years.
Columbia Pictures AP

When Kurt Vonnegut dedicated his novel Slapstick to Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, he pinpointed the way an ideal team can transcend chemistry. Like Vonnegut's Wilbur and Eliza, the twins who became geniuses only in each other's presence, Laurel and Hardy united to become two halves of a single being. They bickered, they kicked each other's backsides, and were always mired in "another fine mess," but there was always the sense that they could not survive apart.

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9:37am

Tue October 15, 2013
Monkey See

'Rocky Horror' And Body Positivity At Midnight

The Sonic Transducers are a Rocky Horror shadow cast located in Washington D.C.
Brendan Passell Courtesy Leandra Lynn

The cult following behind The Rocky Horror Picture Show has been largely underground, but has been no secret. Fans have been going to midnight screenings of the film since 1975 to do The Time Warp again (and again). Presumably, that joke has also been written again (and again).

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8:36am

Tue October 15, 2013
Monkey See

What, Exactly, Is James Franco Doing?

James Franco has big plans, always.
Andrew Medichini AP

What is James Franco doing?

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7:03am

Tue October 15, 2013
Book Reviews

Anne Rice's Wolves Are Worth Catching Up To

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 6:19 pm

Ken Canning iStockphoto.com

The phrase "previously on..." has become quite familiar to American TV audiences. Whether you're devoted to Battlestar Galactica, to Game of Thrones or Breaking Bad, you need to be able to catch up to a narrative when you've missed an installment or two. Novelists were there first, of course — the notion of a chain of novels focusing on the same characters goes back to Trollope and Proust – but it's less common to find a recap at the beginning of a book.

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7:02am

Tue October 15, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Oscar Hijuelos Remembered As 'A Cultural Pioneer'

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Oscar Hijuelos attends the Hispanic Organization of Latin Actors) Awards in 2003 in New York City.
Myrna Suarez Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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4:43pm

Mon October 14, 2013
Author Interviews

Jack London Believed 'Function Of Man Is To Live, Not To Exist'

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 5:54 pm

Jack London's 1903 The Call of the Wild was a sensation — it sold one million copies and made London the most popular American writer of his generation. He's shown above in 1916, shortly before his death at age 40.
AP

A literary critic once remarked, "The greatest story Jack London ever wrote was the story he lived." In his brief life, London sought adventure in the far corners of the world, from the frozen Yukon to the South Pacific, writing gripping tales of survival based on his experiences — including The Call of the Wild, White Fang and The Sea Wolf.

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2:36pm

Mon October 14, 2013
The Salt

This Isn't Your Granny Smith's Harvesting Technology

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 6:12 pm

Ripe Gala apples are ready for picking at an orchard in South Haven, Mich.
spablab Flickr.com

In West Michigan, it's apple harvest time. That may conjure up images of picturesque orchards and old-fashioned fun: growers harvesting apples and then selecting them by hand.

Think again.

Robotic arms, computer vision and high-resolution photography are helping Michigan growers wash, sort and package apples at top speeds in the business — think 2,000 apples per minute.

With this modern technology, farmers are expanding production and getting Galas and Ginger Golds from Michigan orchards to grocery stores faster and more cheaply.

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2:29pm

Mon October 14, 2013
Arts & Life

Bob Mondello Remembers Columbus Day 1963, And A Visit To Camelot

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 9:24 am

President John F. Kennedy enjoys a moment of levity at this Rose Garden ceremony marking Columbus Day, 1963.
AP

Fifty years ago, President Kennedy hosted a Columbus Day ceremony in the Rose Garden, and I was there. Fourteen-year-old me, with my family. This was a fluke. The President had cracked a politically uncool Mafia joke a few days before. Not wanting to offend Italian-American voters, the White House quickly mounted a charm offensive — inviting government workers like my dad, with Italian surnames like Mondello, to celebrate a great Italian explorer, with the president himself.

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2:10pm

Mon October 14, 2013
All Tech Considered

'Menstrual Man' Had An Idea To Help Indian Women

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 3:02 pm

Arunachalam Muruganantham installs his machine in a village in Chhattisgarh, India.
Amit Virmani

Arunachalam Muruganantham had his light bulb moment when he was 29 years old, and holding a sanitary napkin for the first time.

Examining the cotton pads he was buying as a gift for his new wife, the Indian entrepreneur realized that the multinational company that produced them was probably spending cents on raw materials, and making a huge profit.

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12:03pm

Mon October 14, 2013
Author Interviews

One-Stop Shop: Jeff Bezos Wants You To Buy 'Everything' On Amazon

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 12:51 pm

An employee walks through an aisle at Amazon.com's 1.2 million-square foot fulfillment center in Phoenix, Ariz., in November 2012.
Ross D. Franklin AP

In his new book The Everything Store, Brad Stone chronicles how Amazon became an "innovative, disruptive, and often polarizing technology powerhouse." He writes that Amazon was among the first to realize the potential of the Internet and that the company "ended up forever changing the way we shop and read."

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