Arts

7:27am

Thu November 21, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: James McBride, Surprise National Book Award Winner

National Book Awards judges lauded writer James McBride, seen in 2007, for "a voice as comic and original as any we have heard since Mark Twain."
Tiziana Fabi AFP/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more

5:04am

Thu November 21, 2013
The Picture Show

Around The World In ... A Lot Of Steps

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 11:51 am

Paul Salopek and his guide walk into the desert, on day 19 of the "Out of Eden walk" in the Afar region of Northeast Ethiopia. The walk with take about 7 years total.
Paul Salopek National Geographic

Paul Salopek has discovered that the best way to take in information, to be a journalist and a storyteller, is not flying around the world with the latest technology. It's by walking.

"There's something about moving across the surface of the earth at 3 miles per hour that feels really good," he tells NPR's Steve Inskeep.

Salopek plans to walk 21,000 miles total — from Africa to the Middle East, across Asia, down through Alaska and all the way to Tierra del Fuego. He calls it the "Out of Eden Walk" because the idea is to follow the path of human migration.

Read more

2:57am

Thu November 21, 2013
The Two-Way

'Good Lord Bird,' 'The Unwinding' Win National Book Awards

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 12:49 pm

Author James McBride won the 2013 National Book Award for fiction for The Good Lord Bird, about the journey of a young slave in the 1850s.
Victoria Will AP

(This post was updated at 10:30 a.m.)

James McBride won the prestigious National Book Award for fiction on Wednesday for his novel The Good Lord Bird about a young slave who joins the abolitionist John Brown in his anti-slavery mission. Also honored were George Packer, who won in the nonfiction category, Mary Szybist, for poetry, and Cynthia Kadohata, for young people's literature.

Read more

5:17pm

Wed November 20, 2013
The Salt

Moms-To-Be Are Eating Fish, But Choosing Low-Mercury Options

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 8:07 pm

Based on new research, the EPA concludes that women of childbearing age are making more informed choices and opting for low-mercury seafood choices such as shrimp, canned light tuna and salmon.
JackF iStockphoto

It's been a conundrum for pregnant women: Forgo fish out of fears of mercury? Or eat it up to get the benefits of all the vitamins, minerals and omega-3 fatty acids found in many types of fish and shellfish?

Increasingly, it seems women of childbearing age are opting for a smarter option: They're eating fish, but avoiding the species that are high in mercury.

Read more

2:19pm

Wed November 20, 2013
Television

For Key And Peele, Biracial Roots Bestow Special Comedic 'Power'

Keegan-Michael Key (left) and Jordan Peele both started their careers at Second City, Peele in Chicago and Key in Detroit.
Ian White Comedy Central

1:11pm

Wed November 20, 2013
Code Switch

'Go Shorty, It's Your Birthday' And Other Black Bons Mots

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 3:26 pm

A quote from Bartlett's Familiar Black Quotations.
NPR

A press copy of a 3-pound book recently came over the wholly metaphorical Code Switch transom. It's called Bartlett's Familiar Black Quotations, and it's kind of amazing.

Read more

12:10pm

Wed November 20, 2013
Digital Life

Selfies: The World Is More Interesting Because I'm In It

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 1:34 pm

Tell Me More staff and friends pose for "selfies."
NPR

If Vincent van Gogh, Frida Kahlo or Romare Bearden were alive today, would they have loved the selfie?

"Selfies are just a way to show that you are part of the world," says NPR's Social Media Project Manager Kate Myers. "Here I am, and the world is more interesting because I'm in it."

The word "selfie" rose to new prominence this week after it was unanimously picked as word of the year by Oxford Dictionaries.

Read more

11:50am

Wed November 20, 2013
All Tech Considered

Russian App Wants E-Book Piracy To End, Happily Ever After

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 3:55 pm

Moscow-based app Bookmate has a subscription e-book service — similar to others on the U.S. market, but with more of a focus on targeting piracy in emerging literary markets.
Courtesty of Bookmate

In our Weekly Innovation series, we pick an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Got an innovation you think we should feature? Fill out our form.

Read more

7:27am

Wed November 20, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Charlotte Zolotow, Author Of Ethereal Children's Books, Dies

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 9:42 am

(This post was updated at 9:40 a.m.)

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more

4:44am

Wed November 20, 2013
Author Interviews

Gov. Scott Walker Recounts First-Term Battles In New Book

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 4:54 pm

Gov. Scott Walker speaks during a rally for South Carolina Republican Gov. Nikki Haley on Aug. 26 in Greenville, S.C.
Richard Shiro AP

In his new book released this week, Unintimidated: A Governor's Story and a Nation's Challenge, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker reflects on the political firestorm he survived at home in 2012 — and diagnoses what went wrong for the national party.

Read more

Pages