Arts

4:38pm

Sat November 23, 2013
Book Reviews

An Inside Look That Strips The Face Paint Off The NFL

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 8:44 pm

New York Jets tight end Josh Baker celebrates after scoring a touchdown during the first quarter in the game against the New York Giants in 2011.
Julio Cortez AP

Nicholas Dawidoff's Collision Low Crossers: A Year Inside the Turbulent World of NFL Football may be the best book I've ever read about football. It is certainly the most detailed account of the players inside the helmets and the coaches obscured from an enthralled public by large, laminated playsheets.

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4:38pm

Sat November 23, 2013
Author Interviews

'Hunting Season' Examines Racism And Violence In An All-American Town

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 6:07 pm

On a chilly night in November 2008, an Ecuadorean immigrant named Marcelo Lucero was attacked and murdered in the Long Island town of Patchogue, N.Y., where he lived and worked. His attackers, a group of local teenagers, were out "hunting for beaners" — an activity that had become part of their weekly routine.

Lucero, then 37, and his childhood friend, Angel Loja, were out for a late-night stroll when they saw a group of seven young people approaching them.

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7:35am

Sat November 23, 2013
Author Interviews

Even On The Water, Class Remains In Session

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 5:24 pm

As Matt de le Pena's book, The Living, opens, a young man named Shy works as a towel boy by day and a water boy at night, spending his summer earning money on a cruise ship.

Then the big one hits — the epochal earthquake that Californians have always heard would strike one day — and 17-year-old Shy is flung into shark-infested seas from a sinking ship.

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7:35am

Sat November 23, 2013
Fine Art

Kiefer's Bleak Horrors Of War Fill An Entire Building

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 8:50 pm

Anselm Kiefer's Velimir Chlebnikov, a series of 30 paintings devoted to the Russian philosopher who posited that war is inevitable, is on display at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art.
MASS MoCA

Anselm Kiefer was born in 1945, in the Black Forest of southwest Germany, just as the Third Reich was collapsing.

"I was born in ruins, and for me, ruins are something positive," Kiefer says. "Because what you see as a child is positive, you know? And they are positive because they are the beginning of something new."

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7:35am

Sat November 23, 2013
Theater

Broadway's Season Of Adventure

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 11:18 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: The fall season is underway on Broadway. And NPR's Trey Graham may still be a little glassy-eyed, because took in five shows over a three-day weekend. He joins us in our studios. Trey, thanks for making time for us.

TREY GRAHAM, BYLINE: Thanks for having me.

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5:25am

Sat November 23, 2013
Television

Sarah Silverman, Serving Up Sinfully Divine Comedy

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 11:18 am

told Terry Gross in 2010, "there's a safety in what I do because I'm always the idiot. ... I'm always the ignoramus no matter what I talk about or what tragic event, off-color, dark scenario is evoked in my material."" href="/post/sarah-silverman-serving-sinfully-divine-comedy" class="noexit lightbox">
Nothing's sacred in We Are Miracles — but then as Sarah Silverman told Terry Gross in 2010, "there's a safety in what I do because I'm always the idiot. ... I'm always the ignoramus no matter what I talk about or what tragic event, off-color, dark scenario is evoked in my material."
Janet Van Ham HBO

Sarah Silverman is funny — sweet, bawdy, innocent, outrageous, Emmy-winning, milk-through-your-nose funny. And her new comedy special, We are Miracles, debuts tonight on HBO.

Performing in front of a live audience, the comedian takes on religion, pornography, childhood, politics and stereotypes, and no one's left standing. (No really: One punchline involves Hitler being assigned "Heil Marys" as penance.)

Silverman tells NPR's Scott Simon that she thinks good comedy comes from "some kind of childhood humiliation or darkness."

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4:21am

Sat November 23, 2013
Television

Allons-y! Why We've Been Traveling With 'Doctor Who' For 50 Years

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 11:18 am

Jenna Coleman plays Clara, companion to Eleventh Doctor Matt Smith. The relationship between the Doctor and his companions is at the core of Doctor Who's long-lived appeal.
Adrian Rogers/BBC

This afternoon, millions of fez-wearing fans around the world will tune in to a very special episode of Doctor Who. The venerable British sci-fi series turns 50 today — though the time traveling alien Doctor himself is probably somewhere on the wrong side of 1,000.

From scrappy, low-budget beginnings (bubble-wrap monsters, anyone?), Doctor Who has become a global phenomenon. Only soap operas can match it for longevity and popularity. So what's the secret to the Doctor's appeal?

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7:18pm

Fri November 22, 2013
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!

Not My Job: Coach Muffet McGraw Gets Quizzed On Tuffets

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 12:09 pm

Jim Prisching AP

University of Notre Dame women's basketball coach Muffet McGraw has led her team to five NCAA Final Fours, is the reigning Naismith College Coach of the Year, and has a spot in the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame. On top of all that, she could almost certainly beat most NPR listeners at a game of H-O-R-S-E.

The only other Muffet we've ever met is the Little Miss, so we've invited McGraw to play a game called "So what exactly is a tuffet anyway?" Three questions about nursery rhymes and children's songs.

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6:06pm

Fri November 22, 2013
The Salt

Ancient Wine Bar? Giant Jugs Of Vino Unearthed In 3,700-Year-Old Cellar

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 4:06 pm

Graduate student Zach Dunseth carefully excavates wine jugs found in the ruins of a Canaanite palace that dates back to about 1700 B.C.
Eric H. Cline Courtesy of Eric H. Cline/George Washington University

It looks like our ancestors from the Bronze Age were way bigger lushes than we had ever realized.

Archaeologists have discovered a personal wine cellar in a palace that dates back to 1700 B.C. It's the oldest cellar known, and the personal stash was massive.

More than 500 gallons of wine were once stored in a room connected to the palace, located in modern-day northern Israel, scientists said Friday at a conference in Baltimore. That's enough vino to fill 3,000 wine bottles — or a seven-person hot tub.

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4:24pm

Fri November 22, 2013
Book Reviews

How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Senate

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 6:30 pm

Lyndon B. Johnson delivers a speech 28 July 1965 in the White House in Washington, D.C.
AFP/Stringer Getty Images

On Thursday, the Senate passed a historic rules change. Invoking the so-called "nuclear option," Senate Democrats used a rare parliamentary procedure to limit the power of the filibuster — a key method often used by minority parties to check the majority. Now, a simple majority vote will be required to confirm presidential nominees, rather than the 60-vote super-majority once necessary to bypass the filibuster.

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