Arts

3:16am

Wed September 18, 2013
Author Interviews

'Don't Know'? Just Admit It

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 9:19 am

Franck Camhi iStockphoto.com

We've all faked our way through conversations before — whether about books we haven't read, movies we haven't seen or concepts we don't understand. In her new book, I Don't Know: In Praise of Admitting Ignorance (Except When You Shouldn't), Leah Hager Cohen explores moments in history and everyday life when "I don't know" can have a big impact.

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5:02pm

Tue September 17, 2013
Code Switch

How Slavery Shaped America's Oldest And Most Elite Colleges

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 8:45 pm

An early flier for an event at King's College --” which would later become Columbia University — included an advertisement for a slave auction.
John Minchillo AP

A few years ago, Brown University commissioned a study of its own historical connection to the Atlantic slave trade. The report found that the Brown family — the wealthy Rhode Island merchants for whom the university was named — were "not major slave traders, but they were not strangers to the business either."

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4:57pm

Tue September 17, 2013
Books

A Brazilian Writer's Love Letter To Rio De Janeiro

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 6:55 pm

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, shown just before sunrise.
Christophe Simon AFP/Getty Images

While NPR's Melissa Block is in Brazil, we'll be showcasing the work of several Brazilian writers. Today: Tatiana Salem Levy, whose short story "Blazing Sun" was featured in the literary magazine Granta. Levy splits her time between Rio de Janeiro, where she's spent most of her life, and Lisbon, where she was born. She calls "Blazing Sun," which is excerpted below, her love letter to Rio.

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1:39pm

Tue September 17, 2013
The Fresh Air Interview

In Memoir, Linda Ronstadt Describes Her 'Simple Dreams'

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 10:37 am

Linda Ronstadt performs in 1970.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

With a career that spans rock, pop, country and everything in between, Linda Ronstadt knows no genre, only what her voice can accomplish. Her most famous recordings include "Heart Like a Wheel," "Desperado," "Faithless Love," and many more. But last month, Ronstadt revealed that she has Parkinson's disease and can no longer sing.

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1:23pm

Tue September 17, 2013
The Salt

Golden Rice Study Violated Ethical Rules, Tufts Says

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 6:30 pm

Genetically modified to be enriched with beta-carotene, golden rice grains (left) are a deep yellow. At right, white rice grains.
Isagani Serrano International Rice Research Institute

Tufts University announced Tuesday that one of its researchers broke ethical rules while carrying out a study of genetically modified "golden rice" in China.

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12:50pm

Tue September 17, 2013
Monkey See

Fox's 'Dads': If It Weren't Giving Offense, It Wouldn't Be Giving Anything At All

Brenda Song and Seth Green in Fox's Dads.
Jennifer Clasen Fox

12:17pm

Tue September 17, 2013
Parenting

Obesity And Preserving Culture: Latinos Discuss Parenting Challenges

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 7:38 pm

Amy Ta NPR

Health, cultural assimilation and language are some of the top concerns on the minds of a group of Latino parents, social media influencers and regular contributors to Tell Me More. Health was something first lady Michelle Obama highlighted in July, when she addressed the National Council of La Raza, the nation's leading Hispanic civil rights organization.

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10:06am

Tue September 17, 2013
Book Reviews

In 'Sprinkler,' A Wacky Poet Returns With New Obsessions

iStockphoto.com

Nicholson Baker has become a sort of poet of the particular and the peculiar. His books are filled with people who focus minutely on what captivates them – in other words, obsessives. A positive way of looking at obsession is as passion taken to an extreme. The danger, of course, is that the object of one person's intense fascination — such as the broken shoelaces in his unforgettable first novel, The Mezzanine, or the disquisitions on Debussy, dance music, and drones in his latest, Traveling Sprinkler — may spell another's total snore.

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9:24am

Tue September 17, 2013
Book Reviews

A Predictably Pynchonian Take On The Internet And Sept. 11

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 7:07 pm

iStockphoto.com

I approached this review with a little bit of dread. How do you write about the iconic novelist Thomas Pynchon, whose books are strange and difficult things, and whose die-hard readers gather online to wax poetic, and use words like Pynchonian, Pynchonalia and Pynchonesque? They are just so into him, and often so articulate about their love. If you read the thoughtful and detailed writing by Pynchon devotees, they make a very persuasive case.

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7:07am

Tue September 17, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Fight Over Philosopher Ends With Gunfire In Russia

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:47 am

An artist's rendering of German philosopher Immanuel Kant.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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