Arts

10:14am

Wed August 19, 2015
Book Reviews

'Zer0es' Takes The Cyber-Thriller To An Electrifying Extreme

Kainaz Amaria NPR

Hardly a day goes by without some new form of technological menace rearing its head, from the outfitting of drones with handguns to the hacking of cars' navigation systems. It's a fear — and fascination — that science fiction author Chuck Wendig cranks up to 11 in his new cyber-thriller, Zer0es.

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8:57am

Wed August 19, 2015
Monkey See

Television 2015: Netflix Is A Video Store That Saved A Western

Originally published on Wed August 19, 2015 6:02 pm

Robert Taylor stars in Longmire, which is moving from A&E to Netflix.
Ursula Coyote/Cathy Kanavy Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

This is one in a series of essays running this week and next about the state of television in 2015. The series is based on developments at the recent Television Critics Association press tour in Beverly Hills, Calif., where broadcast and cable networks, along with streaming services like Netflix, presented new and existing shows to TV critics and reporters.

Everybody loves to talk about brands, right? What's more exciting than brands?

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7:03am

Wed August 19, 2015
Book Reviews

'Fortune Smiles' Can Be Brilliant, But It's Never Easy

Emily Bogle NPR

"Can you tell a story that doesn't begin, it's just suddenly happening?" asks a character in Adam Johnson's short story collection, Fortune Smiles. And you can, of course; the best stories stretch well beyond their first and last words. They're more than the opening scene; they invite the reader to imagine what came before and what will come after. They're alive and they're limitless.

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7:29pm

Tue August 18, 2015
The Salt

Cherokee Purple: The Story Behind One Of Our Favorite Tomatoes

Originally published on Wed August 19, 2015 5:55 pm

A Cherokee purple tomato grown in Alaska in 2011.
Sherry Shiesl Tatiana's TOMATObase

Fortunately for those of us who are suckers for novelty, every year fruits and vegetables seem to come in more bewitching colors, shapes and flavors. In recent years, we've been transfixed by Glass Gem Corn and the vibrant orange Turkish eggplant.

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2:25pm

Tue August 18, 2015
Movie Interviews

Lily Tomlin At 75: The Actress Discusses Great Roles, Old Cars And Coming Out

Originally published on Wed August 19, 2015 7:47 am

Actress Lily Tomlin (second from right) poses with wife writer Jane Wagner (second from left) and friends Elaine Barbour (left) and Vivian Schneider before the 2014 Kennedy Center Honors in Washington.
Mike Theiler Reuters/Landov

The star of the film Grandma and the Netflix series Grace and Frankie married her partner of 42 years, Jane Wagner, in 2013. She spoke with Fresh Air about being more open about her sexuality.

"I've been out for ... 10 or 11 or 12 years or something. I mean, finally somebody printed it. ... [If asked about her sexuality during a 1989 interview with Terry Gross] I probably would have said something like, um ... 'yes, I am.' I couldn't have lied — it would have been too diminishing to lie."

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1:52pm

Tue August 18, 2015
Movies

Documentary Revisits The 'Dazzling' Polemics Of The Buckley-Vidal Debates

Originally published on Tue August 18, 2015 2:25 pm

William F. Buckley (left) and Gore Vidal square off on Nov. 5, 1968.
ABC Photo Archives ABC via Getty Images

After the Republicans held their lively first debate, you heard people saying what they always say nowadays — that our media-driven political discourse has become shallow and petty, even clownish. Hearing this, an innocent young person might believe that, not so long ago, America was a latter-day Athens in which political arguments were magnificent in their purity and eloquence.

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11:23am

Tue August 18, 2015
Monkey See

Television 2015: With 25 Ways To Watch TV, Does The House Always Win?

Originally published on Tue August 18, 2015 1:45 pm

iStockphoto

This is one in a series of essays running this week and next about the state of television in 2015. The series is based on developments at the recent Television Critics Association press tour in Beverly Hills, Calif., where broadcast and cable networks, along with streaming services like Netflix, presented new and existing shows to TV critics and reporters.

Read more

10:03am

Tue August 18, 2015
Book Reviews

'Dark, Dark' Doings In A Slick Debut Thriller

Originally published on Tue August 18, 2015 11:21 am

Ariel Zambelich NPR

I am slightly embarrassed to admit I had never before encountered the term "hen party" before reading Ruth Ware's suspenseful debut novel In a Dark, Dark Wood. Like so many phrases that describe all-female gatherings, such as quilting bee or kaffeeklatsch, that hen business has a slight cluck of the patronizing to it. That one of the main characters here is nicknamed "Flopsy" doesn't help things along any.

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7:03am

Tue August 18, 2015
Book Reviews

Social Satire, Spiked With Schadenfreude In 'Everybody Rise'

Originally published on Tue August 18, 2015 10:03 am

Courtesy of St. Martin's Press

New York Times reporter Stephanie Clifford's ambitious debut novel, Everybody Rise, about a young social climber desperately trying to claw her way to the top of New York's Old Money society, takes its title from the last lines of Stephen Sondheim's bitter toast of a song, "The Ladies Who Lunch." But its inspiration (like that of Sophie McManus' The Unfortunates, another much buzzed first novel this summer) springs from Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth.

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4:48am

Tue August 18, 2015
Fine Art

Durand-Ruel: The Art Dealer Who Liked Impressionists Before They Were Cool

Originally published on Tue August 18, 2015 9:33 am

Paul Durand-Ruel, shown above in his gallery in 1910, acquired some 5,000 impressionist works — long before others were buying them.
Dornac Durand-Ruel & Cie/Courtesy of Philadelphia Museum of Art

It might seem unusual for an exhibit to focus on a man who sold paintings rather than the artists who painted them. But there was one particular 19th century Paris art dealer who shaped the art market of his day — and ours — by discovering artists who became world-wide favorites. He's now the subject of a major exhibition in Philadelphia.

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