Arts

8:03am

Sun July 20, 2014
Sunday Puzzle

Take A Ride On The Plural Side

Originally published on Sun July 20, 2014 12:08 pm

NPR

On-air challenge: Two clues will be provided. The first is for a brand name that ends in the letter S and sounds like it's plural. Change the first letter to spell a new word that is plural and answers the second clue. Example: tennis shoes, places to sleep; the answer would be Keds and beds.

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7:03am

Sun July 20, 2014
You Must Read This

Lose Yourself In The Wild Forests Of 'Those Who Wish Me Dead'

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 12:09 pm

Jace Wilson is a 13-year-old boy who plans to do what many boneheaded 13-year-olds do: something dumb on a dare, to once and for all dispense with the idea that he might be a coward. But while psyching himself up to go through with the dare, he witnesses a murder — and before we know it, we're off. Michael Koryta's new novel, Those Who Wish Me Dead, sucks you in from the first page and doesn't let you go.

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5:04am

Sun July 20, 2014
Book Reviews

An Elegant, Thoughtful Exploration Of Life In 'Two Italies'

I remember taking an intermediate Italian class in college, and to gauge our linguistic level of proficiency, the professor assigned us a short essay to write. Using the Italian I had picked up from my grandparents, I proudly wrote about my familial ancestry in Calabria. The essay came back with every other word circled in red and labeled "dialetto."

"In this class," the professor said as he picked up the paper from my desk, "we will learn the proper Italian language of Dante." At that moment, I felt at once robbed of my Italian heritage, and ashamed of my Calabrian ancestry.

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9:22pm

Sat July 19, 2014
Monkey See

Television Critics Give Big Awards To 'Breaking Bad,' 'Orange Is The New Black'

Bryan Cranston as Walter White on AMC's Breaking Bad.
Frank Ockenfels AMC

The Television Critics Association is a funny animal. Its challenge, as well as its strength, is that it includes people with massively different jobs: longtime print critics (both nationally and locally oriented) who have been coming to the annual press tour for decades, reporters who cover the television industry, cultural critics whose beats extend past television, online writers who specialize in weekly criticism — this is a lot of people who quite reasonably look at television differently.

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5:05pm

Sat July 19, 2014
Author Interviews

To Meet A 'Mockingbird': Memoir Recalls Talks With Harper Lee

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:34 am

Harper Lee, pictured in 2007 before receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

In 1960, Harper Lee published To Kill a Mockingbird, won the Pulitzer Prize, and overnight became one of America's most beloved writers. But Lee was overwhelmed by the media blitz that followed. She retreated from the public eye, became wary of journalists, and never published another book.

Then, in 2001, a reporter for The Chicago Tribune showed up in Lee's hometown of Monroeville, Ala., to work on a story about the town, which is the model for the fictional setting of Lee's novel.

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3:41pm

Sat July 19, 2014
Book News & Features

A Shot And A Book: How To Read In Bars

As a critic, I read for work. Or rather, I read and then work to translate that experience into something others might read. The hope is that they'll then be compelled enough to also read, if it's any good, the thing I wrote about me reading. That's a pretty meaningful exchange for a reviewer.

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8:11am

Sat July 19, 2014
Book Your Trip

Watch Out For That Butterfly: The Lure Of Literary Time Travel

Originally published on Sat July 19, 2014 11:45 am

Guy Pearce aboard his time machine in the 2002 movie version of H.G. Wells' classic novel.
The Kobal Collection

Where would you go, if you had a time machine? Ancient Egypt? Tang Dynasty China? The Globe Theater, in 1599? Or maybe to the 25th century, because who knows, Buck Rogers might actually be there.

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8:11am

Sat July 19, 2014
Remembrances

Elaine Stritch: 'I'm Not Easy'

Originally published on Sat July 19, 2014 11:45 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

We want to take a moment now to remember Elaine Stritch. She died this week at the age of 89 after a career that ran for seven decades on Broadway and the West End, movies and television. She sang about "The Ladies Who Lunch" in her signature voice - gruff, bruised, but strong.

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8:11am

Sat July 19, 2014
Author Interviews

Author Finds The Human Side Of The IMF

Originally published on Sat July 19, 2014 8:41 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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7:08am

Sat July 19, 2014
Goats and Soda

In The World Of Global Gestures, The Fist Bump Stands Alone

One set of knuckles meets another. Both are equal in this greeting that expresses approval and triumph.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Back in the 2008 presidential campaign, candidate Barack Obama launched a media storm when he nonchalantly fist bumped his wife Michelle. "Obama's Fist-bump Rocks The Nation!: The Huffington Post exclaimed. "Is the fist bump the new high-five?" NPR's Laura Silverman asked.

Obama has done it again.

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