Arts

9:34am

Fri January 31, 2014
TED Radio Hour

Is Too Much Privacy Bad For Your Health?

Originally published on Fri January 31, 2014 12:02 pm

"People like to share, if you give them the opportunity and the choice." — John Wilbanks
James Duncan Davidson TED

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode The End Of Privacy.

What are your thoughts on privacy? Tell us at huff.to/yourprivacy a special collaboration with TED, NPR and The Huffington Post.

About John Wilbanks' TEDTalk

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9:34am

Fri January 31, 2014
TED Radio Hour

Can The Open-Data Revolution Change Our Democracies?

Originally published on Fri January 31, 2014 12:02 pm

"What we need to do is think of ourselves as active participants in the conversation." — Beth Noveck
James Duncan Davidson TED

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The End Of Privacy.

What are your thoughts on privacy? Tell us at huff.to/yourprivacy a special collaboration with TED, NPR and The Huffington Post.

About Beth Noveck's TEDTalk

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7:52am

Fri January 31, 2014
The Two-Way

Book News: U.N.-Backed Report Finds 'Shocking' Levels of Youth Illiteracy

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

  • An education report commissioned by UNESCO found "shocking levels of youth illiteracy" around the world. At least 250 million of the 650 million primary school age children globally aren't learning basic skills in reading and math, the report finds.

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5:22am

Fri January 31, 2014
Author Interviews

What Wakes B.J. Novak Up In The Middle Of The Night?

Originally published on Fri January 31, 2014 7:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

When we talk about a triple threat we're often talking about a versatile athlete. Think about a basketball player who can score, defend, and rebound. In show biz, B. J. Novak may be that triple threat. He can do standup, act, and write successfully in all cases. He got his start doing standup comedy. That led to a job on the hit comedy series "The Office" where he had a regular part and was one of the writers.

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6:56pm

Thu January 30, 2014
Movie Reviews

At Home, With Mom And Her Murderous Beau

Originally published on Fri January 31, 2014 7:51 pm

Depressed single mother Adele (Kate Winslet) and her son, Henry (Gattlin Griffith), give the wounded and desperate Frank (Josh Brolin) a ride, only to realize that Frank is an escaped convict being hunted by local police.
Dale Robinette Paramount Pictures and Indian Paintbrush

So here's the setup: It's 1987. Frank, a convicted murderer, has escaped from a New Hampshire prison, and he's holding Adele, a fragile divorcee, and her 12-year-old son, Henry, captive in their own house until they eat his chili.

Turns out it's good chili — so good that it inspires Adele, whom the handsome convict has tied up very gently and tenderly, to reminisce about a conversation she and her son had about his sex education class. Seriously, it's some good chili. And did I mention that Frank is handsome?

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5:32pm

Thu January 30, 2014
Movie Reviews

On Urban Streets, Off-Roaders Stir A Noisy Conversation

The Kickstarter-funded 12 O'Clock Boys, director Lotfy Nathan's first film, examines whether dirt bikes keep kids from joining gangs or if they just invent new problems for urban Baltimore.
Courtesy of Oscilloscope Laboratories

"This is our tradition, our culture, our release."

So says one of the 12 O'Clock Boys — a large group of dirt bike and ATV enthusiasts who, depending on your perspective, either grace or terrorize the streets of Baltimore each Sunday with acrobatic feats on their motorbikes. They weave through the city traffic, popping extended wheelies, the line of their bikes almost at vertical, approximating the hands of a clock at noon.

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5:32pm

Thu January 30, 2014
All Tech Considered

Small Cinemas Struggle As Film Fades Out Of The Picture

Originally published on Thu January 30, 2014 8:00 pm

The Roxie Theater in San Francisco still has two 35 millimeter projectors, but the switch to digital is inevitable.
Laura Sydell NPR

Cinema owners who don't have a digital projector in their movie house can't show Paramount Pictures' latest release: The Wolf of Wall Street. This year Paramount became the first big studio to distribute a major release in the U.S. entirely in a digital format, and other studios are likely to follow.

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5:02pm

Thu January 30, 2014
Movie Reviews

'Charlie Victor Romeo': In Crisis In The Cockpit

Originally published on Fri January 31, 2014 5:24 pm

Sam Zuckerman, Noel Dinneen and Nora Woolley play various airplane pilots in Charlie Victor Romeo, a white-knuckle docudrama with dialogue taken from the voice recorders of six planes that crashed between 1985 and 1996.
Collective: Unconscious

By the end of Charlie Victor Romeo, almost 800 people will be dead, with hundreds more injured. But this methodical film, adapted from a theater piece first performed in 1999, doesn't actually show any of that carnage. It focuses tightly — very tightly — on a few people who are trying to prevent disaster.

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5:02pm

Thu January 30, 2014
Movie Reviews

On Campus, Two Weary Souls Find A Spark To Kindle

Andy Garcia and Vera Farmiga star as two weary strangers who meet — and spark mutual midlife awakenings — while taking their kids on a college tour.
Anchor Bay Films

Long after many another serviceable movie premise has gone to its grave, the brief encounter will live and be well.

Talk about an unbeatable package: Nothing more urgently captures the disappointment of lives congealed by routine than does the sudden midlife romance; nothing so pointedly speaks to the undying desire for completion by another who understands and accepts us as no one else does; nothing so completely resounds with the fantasy of escape. And nothing so neatly contains all that unruly desire within the 11th-hour return to common sense and responsible self-sacrifice.

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2:41pm

Thu January 30, 2014
Music

'Spirit Of Family' Unites Ladysmith Black Mambazo

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 11:58 am

Darren Phillip Jones

For fans of world music, South Africa's Ladysmith Black Mambazo needs no introduction.

The group has been singing a capella together for 50 years, brought together by Joseph Shabalala, a young farmhand turned factory worker from the town of Ladysmith. He had a dream of tight vocal harmonies and messages of peace.

That dream developed, and the band came to the attention of Paul Simon, who had it record "Homeless" on his album Graceland. It introduced the group to the world.

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