Arts

11:59am

Fri February 21, 2014
Monkey See

Who Killed The New 'RoboCop'?

Alex Murphy (Joel Kinnaman) is a Detroit cop brought back from the brink of death β€” as a cyborg supercop built for reducing crime and increasing profit.
Kerry Hayes Sony Pictures

The Retouchables is a column examining the recycling of pop-cultural properties. Future installments will discuss remakes in development, or that should be, or that were made but should not have been, or for which I have written several script treatments. Did you not get them? Call me.

Our inaugural dispatch deconstructs a long-in-development remake that has finally come to semi-sweet fruition.

The Past Of The Future Of Law Enforcement

Read more

11:59am

Fri February 21, 2014
Barbershop

Are The Barbershop Guys Sorry They Are Not Idris Elba?

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 12:11 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more

11:59am

Fri February 21, 2014
Faith Matters

From Buddhism to Baha'i: Black Faith Spreads Across All Religions

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 12:11 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Let's turn to Faith Matters now. That's the part of the program where we talk about matters of religion, faith and spirituality. It's Black History Month so that got us thinking about the importance of faith to African-Americans throughout history and to this day. But a recent piece in the Huffington Post's religion section also got us thinking about how that faith practice is much more diverse than many people might realize.

Read more

7:48am

Fri February 21, 2014
The Two-Way

Book News: Year's Oddest Title? 'Pie-ography,' 'Working Class Cats' In Running

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more

7:03am

Fri February 21, 2014
Poetry

Wise, Funny Poems, Saved From The Trash Bin In The Nick Of 'Time'

iStockphoto

It always feels good to see a poet rescued from oblivion. Michael Benedikt (1935-2007), a prominent figure in the poetry scene of the 1960s and 70s, was not exactly an important poet, but he was β€” and in his work, he remains β€” a deeply enjoyable one.

Read more

6:58pm

Thu February 20, 2014
Movie Reviews

One Conflict, One Wall, Two Sides Of The Arab-Israeli World

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 5:27 pm

Omar (Adam Bakri) is a Palestinian baker and secret informant who braves the wall that splits his community to visit his lover, Nadia (Leem Lubany) in the Oscar-nominated film Omar.
Adopt Films

American art-house audiences are being offered an intriguing exercise in double vision over the next couple of weeks: two movies about Palestinian informants and their complicated relationships with Israel's secret service, one directed by a Palestinian, the other by an Israeli. Their similarities turn out to be nearly as intriguing as their differences.

Read more

6:33pm

Thu February 20, 2014
Movie Reviews

'Pompeii': In Ancient Rome, A Hot 3-D Mess

Game of Thrones' Kit Harington plays a gladiator who finds love, friendship and vengeance β€” all in one fateful weekend β€” in the shadow of Mount Vesuvius.
Sony Pictures

You can say this for director Paul W.S. Anderson: He gets the basic purpose of 3-D movies. While the current renaissance in cinematic stereoscopy is touted as a method for creating more "immersive" experiences for audiences, the list of movies that achieve that lofty goal can be counted on one hand: Gravity, Hugo, Life of Pi. Most 3-D exists to bilk customers out of a few extra bucks.

Read more

5:03pm

Thu February 20, 2014
Movie Reviews

Zola's Scandalous Raquin Clan, Sordid 'Secret' And All

Therese (Elizabeth Olsen) and Laurent (Oscar Issac) have a scandalous affair β€” and some real chemistry. But the unevenness of In Secret, adapted from Emile Zola's novel Therese Raquin, moves their plotline away from center.
Phil Bray Roadside Attractions

Emile Zola was one of the founders of naturalism, and his first major work, 1867's Therese Raquin, is full of precise physical description. The novel's plot is utter melodrama, though, and that's the aspect emphasized by In Secret, the latest in a century-long string of film and TV adaptations.

With its small cast of characters and limited number of locations, the book does lend itself to dramatization. In fact, writer-director Charlie Stratton's retelling of Zola's shocker was derived in part from the stage version by Neal Bell.

Read more

3:17pm

Thu February 20, 2014
Movie Interviews

At Last, David O. Russell Is Making The Films He Was Meant To Make

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 5:25 pm

A '70s con artist (Christian Bale, right) is forced to team up with an FBI agent (Bradley Cooper, left) in American Hustle, inspired by a real-life sting targeting corrupt politicians.
Francois Duhamel Columbia Pictures

Filmmaker David O. Russell first talked with Fresh Air's Terry Gross back in 1994, and two decades later, he tells her: "It's taken me 20 years since I first spoke to you to really make the films that I think I was meant to make, and to be at the level of filmmaking and storytelling and writing that I think I had ever aspired to."

Read more

1:36pm

Thu February 20, 2014
Monkey See

If You Like The Old 'About A Boy,' You May Not Like The New 'About A Boy'

Benjamin Stockham as Marcus and David Walton as Will in NBC's adaptation of About A Boy.
Jordin Althaus NBC

If you're familiar with the Nick Hornby book or the 2002 film of About A Boy, you will find that what has been kept in the new TV adaptation, coming Saturday night in a preview to NBC, is the clichΓ©d skeleton of the story: a lazy, glib bachelor befriending the child of a single mom and learning how not to be such a selfish baby. Child-averse jerk and wisecracking moppet: a well-worn dynamic that animated, among other things, the early stages of Two And A Half Men.

Read more

Pages