Arts

5:12pm

Sat March 1, 2014
Code Switch

'Mad Black Men': Yes, There Were Black People In '60s Advertising

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 1:23 am

Mad Black Men's protagonist, Ron Rapper, gets a skeptical look from the secretary on his first day in the office.
Mad Black Men

When Mad Men first premiered on AMC in 2007, Xavier Ruffin — a young, African-American graphic designer from Milwaukee, Wisc. — really wanted to like it.

"I wanted to be a fan of it when it first came out," Ruffin tells NPR's Arun Rath. "I just had my own personal differences. Not liking the way blacks were represented in their universe. I just couldn't get over it."

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9:50am

Sat March 1, 2014
Business

A Picket Line At The Oscars: Visual-Effects Artists To Protest

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 11:37 am

Hundreds of visual-effects artists are planning to picket the Academy Awards on Sunday for the second year in a row. They're hoping to bring attention to what's been happening in their industry.

The field is losing jobs and relocating to countries with bigger subsidies for employers. It's the result of a technical revolution that's changed the profession since it kicked off in the 70s with Star Wars creator George Lucas' visual-effects company, Industrial Light and Magic.

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8:02am

Sat March 1, 2014
Monkey See

Nine Best Picture Nominees, Many Funny Faces, And A Couple Of Bonus Features

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 5:33 am

7:56am

Sat March 1, 2014
Author Interviews

With Teens And Social Media, Lack Of Context Is Everything

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 11:03 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

You know, as I host this program, I'm on a social media platform - Twitter, as a matter of fact. There is no group that takes that new social media platform more than teenagers, and that's exactly what worries a lot of parents. Danah Boyd is a respected researcher in the world of social media. She spent years studying teenagers and how they interact online. Her findings are in a new book called "It's Complicated." In this encore broadcast, NPR's Elizabeth Blair reports.

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7:56am

Sat March 1, 2014
Arts & Life

Web Series On Theater Turns Drama Into Comedy

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 11:03 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

"Submissions Only" is a backstage comedy - in fact, it goes so far backstage, it goes into the auditions. It's the story of eager, hopeful actors, hectored and hectoring agents, and demanding casting directors who work just around the corner from Broadway.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (as character) Hey, Pen, I went on theater burn and wrote I don't care who's directing "Jeremy's Fort," as long as Penny Riley is still in it. She's going to be fierce.

KATE WETHERHEAD: (as Penny) Aw. And then did everybody write Penny who?

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7:56am

Sat March 1, 2014
Author Interviews

Cheever Biographer Turns His Eye On His Own Troubled Family

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 11:03 am

Blake Bailey has written biographies of John Cheever, Richard Yates and Charles Jackson.
Mary Brinkmeyer

Blake Bailey is best known for his prize-winning biographies of great writers who were also destructive — and not just self-destructive — people. His books on John Cheever, Richard Yates, and Charles Jackson have been sympathetic, but unsparing.

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7:56am

Sat March 1, 2014
Author Interviews

If Anyone Can Make Golf Exciting, It'd Be Dan Jenkins

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 11:03 am

Dan Jenkins has covered sporting events around the world, from golf to football to skiing, from Pebble Beach to Green Bay to Gstaad, in pungent prose with a Texas kick — and in the process, he's become more famous than a lot of the athletes he was writing about.

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7:56am

Sat March 1, 2014
Movie Interviews

Elaine Stritch, Volatile And Vulnerable In 'Shoot Me'

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 11:03 am

Fists balled and feet planted, cabaret legend Elaine Stritch powers through a song with her longtime music director, Rob Bowman, in a scene from Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me.
Isotope Films

Elaine Stritch is the lioness in winter. She's 89 and still performs ocassionally, after eight decades on Broadway and the West End. Sir Noel Coward reworked his musical, Sail Away, to give her all the best songs. She stopped Stephen Sondheim's Company in the middle of the show when she sang "The Ladies Who Lunch," which has become her signature song.

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5:57pm

Fri February 28, 2014
Monkey See

What The Oscars Mean, And What They Don't

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 10:35 pm

In Alfonso Cuaron's Gravity, one of nine best picture nominees in the running on Sunday night, Sandra Bullock plays an astronaut careening through space after an accident.
Warner Bros.

On Friday's All Things Considered, Bob Mondello and I — fresh off our run of video salutes to Internet comments — chat with Melissa Block about what, if anything, is satisfying about the Oscars.

Bob points out the difficulty in bringing yourself to care about a contest that so often leaves out the worthiest contenders; I make the best case I can for Oscar season as a potential time of discovery; and we consider a couple of canards about best picture that might help you pick a winner.

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4:01pm

Fri February 28, 2014
Book Reviews

Power And Violence In Ukraine And Mexico

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 10:35 pm

A woman walks with a child in Kiev's Independence square.
Bulent Kilic AFP/Getty Images

This week's headlines have been dominated by the violent protests in Kiev, the ousting of President Victor Yanukovych, and the amassing of Russian troops at the Ukrainian border. Writer Anthony Marra says that if Soviet war journalist Vasily Grossman were alive today, he'd likely be breaking news from Independence Square.

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